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Any One for a Scotch? - Page 77

post #1141 of 3227

i've always been curious about macallan's labeling as a highland scotch. is it because geographically it's part of the highland region?

i don't have any other speyside brands on hand to see what they're labeled on their bottles. 

post #1142 of 3227

18yo Longmorn last night at the Brandy Library in NYC. Exceptionally warm, treacle and cake-like. Reminded me greatly of one of my favorites, Royal Lochnagar. Yummy. Want more.

 

~ H

 

post #1143 of 3227
I tried the Laphroaig 10. I opened the bottle and took a sniff and it was like BAM all up in my face. The flavor is so strong I don't even notice the taste of alcohol. The taste of peat and smoke and the sea (for lack of a better adjective) was intense. Not sure if I like it or not yet. I think it'll take some time to decide.
post #1144 of 3227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Althis View Post

The taste of peat and smoke and the sea (for lack of a better adjective) was intense.

That was actually a perfect description (and exactly why Laphroaig lovers love Laphroaig).
post #1145 of 3227
It reminds me of a foggy, gloomy day.
post #1146 of 3227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Althis View Post

It reminds me of a foggy, gloomy day.

In other words, the ideal conditions for a dram of Laphroaig. You sure you're not reading from some Laphroaig marketing literature? wink.gif
post #1147 of 3227
Tried these over the holidays. The 40 Oaks was, surprise, very oaky. A little thin at first but it really opened up with a splash of water.
The Glenmorangie was nice. The Sauternes cask finishing added an interesting, kinda sour, element.

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post #1148 of 3227
Quote:
Originally Posted by I<3Bacon View Post

In other words, the ideal conditions for a dram of Laphroaig. You sure you're not reading from some Laphroaig marketing literature? wink.gif

Just the label and what I gathered about the taste from this thread haha. I didn't expect it to be so true; but even if I hadn't read about it, I think that would still be my initial impression.
post #1149 of 3227
Actually, I find the Laphroig 10 to be a little raw. I much prefer the 15 or the Quarter Cask....all the same character but a little less rough.

That said, Laphroig is not the best choice for an introduction to single malts. Ardbeg even less so. And anything less than 12 years old is rarely, in my opinion, representative of the best that the label has to offer. Or even what's "good."

I got started with Talisker 10 (one of those rare 'uns) and moved onto Lagavulin 16. I keep coming back to the Lagavulin even though I have had some pretty amazing drams from other regions.
post #1150 of 3227
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Actually, I find the Laphroig 10 to be a little raw. I much prefer the 15 or the Quarter Cask....all the same character but a little less rough.
That said, Laphroig is not the best choice for an introduction to single malts. Ardbeg even less so. And anything less than 12 years old is rarely, in my opinion, representative of the best that the label has to offer. Or even what's "good."
I got started with Talisker 10 (one of those rare 'uns) and moved onto Lagavulin 16. I keep coming back to the Lagavulin even though I have had some pretty amazing drams from other regions.

If I was making a recommendation of some single malts that might make a good introduction to whiskey, while also serving as very good representatives of the Scotch aisle, I'd recommend, in no particular order; BenRiach 16 year old, Glendronach, Revival, Dalmore Gran Reserva or 15 year old, Glennfiddich, either the 12 yo or 15 yo, and finally, Laphroiag 18 year old.
post #1151 of 3227
Got a Macallan 12 and I must say, it's probably my favorite so far with the Glenfiddich 12 next, then the Glenlivet 12 and then the Macallan 10 Fine Oak.

Still deciding on the Laphroaig, but I'm starting to like it; it's totally different from these speysides, and it's kind of refreshing.
post #1152 of 3227
Quote:
Originally Posted by Althis View Post

Got a Macallan 12 and I must say, it's probably my favorite so far with the Glenfiddich 12 next, then the Glenlivet 12 and then the Macallan 10 Fine Oak.
Still deciding on the Laphroaig, but I'm starting to like it; it's totally different from these speysides, and it's kind of refreshing.

Macallan 12 is awesome
post #1153 of 3227

I truly enjoy drinking, Japanese pure malt whisky. I still do like some scotches from Speyside though nod[1].gif

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post #1154 of 3227
There are many great single malts available. It all depends however on what you like in terms of flavor profile.

For example, if you are a fan of honeyed, smooth, yet interesting drams, then try Cragganmore 12 years and Glenfiddich 15 Solera.

If you like sherried scotch, try: GlenDronach 12 or 15 yrs (the 15 is really impressive), Oban 14, Glenlivet 18.

If you like some smoke and toffee and a bit more challenging but rewarding flavor profile, try anything by Highland Park.

For those peat and smoke fans of Islay, probably the best is Lagavulin 16 years.

I know all this because, besides clothes, I am quite obsessed with scotch.

I operate a non-profit, independent scotch review blog for kicks: http://jason-scotchreviews.blogspot.com/

Cheers!


Jason
Edited by golfnutter66 - 1/9/12 at 11:56am
post #1155 of 3227
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfnutter66 View Post

For example, if you are a fan of honeyed, smooth, yet interesting drams, then try Cragganmore 12 years and Glenfiddich 15 Solera.
If you like sherried scotch, try: GlenDronach 12 or 15 yrs (the 15 is really impressive), Oban 14, Glenlivet 18.

I would argue that the Glenfiddich 15yr and Oban 14yr should trade places... and the Glenlivet 18yr sits somewhere in between. Otherwise, these are good recs for introductory single malts.
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