or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › OTR Collar like Phat Guido's
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

OTR Collar like Phat Guido's - Page 3

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Recoil View Post

Some people refer to collar gap as the gap between the jacket and the neck but given the picture in the beginning of this thread and most other responses its pretty clear what the OP is talking about.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sterling Gillette View Post

This is simply a shirt with too short collar points and has nothing to do with a gaping collar.

Are we on the same page yet?
post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phat Guido View Post

- CORRECTION = Your aim in life as a SF member is to get as much made for you & not rely on batch variation from OTR makers.
- in the long term, items made for you will return in spades compared to all the OTR you buy at discount hoping to get a good fit.
- as EarthDragon mentioned, a Ascot Chan or any bespoke (even MTM) will be on average less than the 1st or 2nd tier branded shirts out there.

Hi PG,

While we're on the subject, I DO want to ask you what type of collar that is. I started making shirts with AC and I'm very happy with my extreme spread collars (oh which I instructed them like 5 times what I wanted), but I do want a more "conventional" collars for more traditional settings. I remember from your brog that your collars are bespoke too right?
post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sterling Gillette View Post

This is simply a shirt with too short collar points and has nothing to do with a gaping collar.

Nobody but you has used the word 'gape' or 'gaping'. He never said a 'gaping collar', he said a 'collar gap'. Yes, these usually mean the same thing, but it's a vague enough term that it doesn't seem unreasonable for it to also be applied to the gap between the collar points and the lapel. There is no written official definition for 'collar gap' that states it applies to a gaping collar and nothing else, and even if there was it is pretty clear what he means so your argument is pure pedantry.
post #34 of 44
Putthison had a post recently where the author referred to collar points that dont meet the lapel as a "collar gap" and claimed it was a sartorial no-no ( it's not; it's just a style preference) and this seems to be where the confusion comes from.
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanguis Mortuum View Post


Nobody but you has used the word 'gape' or 'gaping'. He never said a 'gaping collar', he said a 'collar gap'. Yes, these usually mean the same thing, but it's a vague enough term that it doesn't seem unreasonable for it to also be applied to the gap between the collar points and the lapel. There is no written official definition for 'collar gap' that states it applies to a gaping collar and nothing else, and even if there was it is pretty clear what he means so your argument is pure pedantry.

Consider the context though. The OP is taking a term PG uses (always to mean what Stirling Gillette says) to talk about PG's collars. On PG's blog and all over Styleforum, that term means one consistent thing. For you to argue that the term could also mean the collar points not fitting under the lapel is to completely ignore the fact that context and precedence help control meaning through consensus. Sure, you can say a particular word means whatever you want it to mean and call Stirling Gillette a pedant, but that doesn't help clarify communication.
post #36 of 44
Everyone in this thread knows damn well what the OP was referring to and to take the condescending approach that he didn't use the "right" term is ridiculous. The guy came for some help and there are many people willing to provide it so the rest of the lot can save the pretence and get lost.
post #37 of 44
If you're going to spend the money to get a collar as such you might as well go bespoke or at least MTM.
post #38 of 44
About collars...thinking of having my first MTM and I am down to choosing a style between 'Classic' point collar vs. 'Cutaway'

classic.jpg

cut-away.jpg

I am already leaning towards the 'cutaway' but want to know how much of this is true: "The point collar is most at home on a man with round facial features; the collar's elongating effect help to even out the look of his face. Men with thin faces should avoid these collars, as that they will only accentuate this feature."

and "With that being said the spread collar is most at home on a man with thin or long facial features; the collar's widening effect help to even out the look of the face. Men with round faces should avoid these collars, unless they plan on wearing them without a tie."

My body and face type of more on the slim side more so than round, so I am considering the 'cutaway' 4.8cm back height and 8.5cm collar point. Are those measurements too extreme? In staying with this thread topic, I just wish to avoid the gap between collar point and jacket lapel.
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

About collars...thinking of having my first MTM and I am down to choosing a style between 'Classic' point collar vs. 'Cutaway'

classic.jpg

cut-away.jpg

I am already leaning towards the 'cutaway' but want to know how much of this is true: "The point collar is most at home on a man with round facial features; the collar's elongating effect help to even out the look of his face. Men with thin faces should avoid these collars, as that they will only accentuate this feature."

and "With that being said the spread collar is most at home on a man with thin or long facial features; the collar's widening effect help to even out the look of the face. Men with round faces should avoid these collars, unless they plan on wearing them without a tie."

My body and face type of more on the slim side more so than round, so I am considering the 'cutaway' 4.8cm back height and 8.5cm collar point. Are those measurements too extreme? In staying with this thread topic, I just wish to avoid the gap between collar point and jacket lapel.

I'm by no means an expert in Tailoring as I'm just starting out myself. But when it comes to collars, just try out as many as u can (if you're doing MTM/Beskople) and just get the one the looks best on ya.
post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

I am already leaning towards the 'cutaway' but want to know how much of this is true: "The point collar is most at home on a man with round facial features; the collar's elongating effect help to even out the look of his face. Men with thin faces should avoid these collars, as that they will only accentuate this feature."

and "With that being said the spread collar is most at home on a man with thin or long facial features; the collar's widening effect help to even out the look of the face. Men with round faces should avoid these collars, unless they plan on wearing them without a tie."

My body and face type of more on the slim side more so than round, so I am considering the 'cutaway' 4.8cm back height and 8.5cm collar point. Are those measurements too extreme? In staying with this thread topic, I just wish to avoid the gap between collar point and jacket lapel.

you read far too much into that. adhering to "rules" for the sake of rules is a folly.

look at a few pictures, to see what appeals to you.

i find a slight spread the most elegant of all collars
post #41 of 44
Try the tall semi-cutaway. That's what I'm wearing in my Avatar pic.
post #42 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeLA View Post

Someday a woman will have sex with this Phat Guido guy, and when that happens he will stop taking pictures of his tie.
Lol.
post #43 of 44
Thread Starter 
It looks like the term "collar gap" threw everyone into a tizzy, with varying opinions on the definition. The one I've most often seen is when there is a noticeable space between the collar points and the lapels. Everyone else can call a collar gap what they want. Having said that, my original point was that there are a number of factors to consider in how a shirt collar is worn with a jacket and tie, some of which we may not consciously think about when we put on a dress shirt and tie. Clearly PG has put much time and effort into finding his own combination of collar point length, height, and spread. It's easy enough to close the "collar gap" with many an OTR shirt - pick your favorite label. Some folks rightly suggested brands that come closer to the look I'm striving for, such as Finamore, etc. In the end, I've decided I'll have to go bespoke.

Here's a post that does a much better job of describing some of the subtleties of the look that I was referring to.
post #44 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

I have similar question regarding dress shirts but perhaps are a lower price range? perhaps starting with brooks brother and lower or higher tier?

I got a bunch of Beams slim fit shirts that are honestly really good for the $70 or so I paid for each of them on sale. I think they might be about double that normally. Obviously they have no handwork and I didn't really pore over them yet, but they're cut much like a decent Italian camicia and give off that vibe, nice wide collar, slightly higher collarband, higher arm scyes and more tubular sleeves, darted backs. The top side of the collar is fused and the bottom is floating, I think, decent roll, fabrics are kinda eh but to be expected. They have MOP buttons, not sure if they're single needle or not. I got mine in a 15.5/39 as I normally would, I find them about a half inch short in the sleeve for my liking but it's not the end of the world, they're good utilitarian shirts, certainly the best I've seen for the price.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › OTR Collar like Phat Guido's