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Photo essay on Britain's last oak bark tannery - Page 4

post #46 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by james_timothy View Post

Quote:
If you go to a cafe in Italy and it’s the main man in the cafe, people treat him with respect. That’s what he does, that’s his job. He runs the cafe, he’s the main waiter at the cafe. He’s good with people, he manages the cafe well but here it’s like ‘oh, you work in a caff. Oh, you make clothes’. In other countries making isn’t deemed to be a crap job. Here we’ve lost that, we don’t respect that enough. That’s why they struggle to find people to work in factories, because it’s not a glamourous thing to do, not even a glamourous thing to do, it’s not seen as a decent thing to do, it’s a bit embarrassing to do. And that’s a real shame. I think that’s a big problem.
From here..

I'm recalling a member here who said, after three generations of working in a factory, over his dead body was he going to work in a factory. Somehow we dehumanized the work in factories, removed the craftsmanship aspect, so much that no one wanted to do it any more.

The rot set in when we moved from workshops to factories. Craftsmen are time consuming and expensive to train, much cheaper in the long run to invest in a machine that will sort of do the job at least well enough for most people not to notice. It's as a result of that that factory work is so dull and most ofnthe products of today are so poor. Craftsmanship, certainly in our trade is getting harder and harder to find, we find it next tomimpossible to find good people and the youngsters aren't interested in working with their hands. Maybe the Internet will help the craft based businesses show why what they do is different and valuable

Charlie
post #47 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by james_timothy View Post

From here..

I'm recalling a member here who said, after three generations of working in a factory, over his dead body was he going to work in a factory. Somehow we dehumanized the work in factories, removed the craftsmanship aspect, so much that no one wanted to do it any more.

Excellent, excellent point Sir--

Exactly why when people ask me what I do for a living, They fret and say "that's a dying art". Yes, it's perceived that way but, I see it in a reverse way. There is a need for high-end services. We deliver to that market. I love doing it. Always strive to raise the bar. Appreciate both positive and negative feedback in order to improve. My Kids? Both have nearly 4.0 Cm's in college. One is pursuing a careerer in security. The other was reviewed as "the best intern ever" at a major publication that most of you know. Invited back. Will they get into my business? I doubt it but they are welcomed. As long as they peruse there passions. And let's face it, what I do is not glamorous but, it's my passion.
post #48 of 230
No man should be coerced into following his father's footsteps- but the society at large shouldn't be putting such a low premium on working with ones hands.

Workshops seem to be back on the rise, in small numbers. I'm thinking for example of Tanners in Portland, Oregon, which to my eye looks like a bunch of kids running a leather goods operation. They seem to making a go of it- which is just great.

That's obviously why I like this Baker/Equus project as much as I do. The handwork can be traced all the way through the process. It may or may not be "the best belt"; but it should be one very nice belt, and one that combines an great idea with a niece piece of work.
post #49 of 230
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Edited by Louis XIV - 10/12/11 at 12:54pm
post #50 of 230
Hi Louis,

Our closest buckle to 35mm is 1 3/8", its quite an unusual size but we can certain do it in some styles, for e.g. the Brass West End. I hope to have definite prices on Mon or Tues and will let all interested know. I'm not going to put a closing date on the offer, but given the Aus Nut run will be limited to 16 belts and its first come first I think it will self limit quite quickly given the interest so far.

Regarding blue boat shoes we carry blue leather, but for the contrarian London Tan, Sedwicks or Bakers might make for an interesting contrast!

Charlie
post #51 of 230
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Edited by Louis XIV - 10/12/11 at 12:54pm
post #52 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by james_timothy View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by uniesse View Post

Charlie,

Would you consider doing a lined and raised version?

Hi Uniesse,

I think we won't be doing a Lined and Raised this time - they use a lot of leather and given our intent is to buy 1/2 a pair of Australian Nut and maybe 1/2 a pair of London Tan I don't think there will be enough to go around, I'm sorry. The end results would be beautiful and I can see it happening in the future.

Charlie
post #53 of 230
Count me in, this sounds like a great project!

How thick is the leather used in this belt? I think the thickness will affect my choice of belt width.
post #54 of 230
I'll confirm the final spec with the price, but I'm anticipating very similar to the Sedgwicks bridle butt we normally use, 3.5-4mm. To me thats just the right heft for a mans belt

Charlie
post #55 of 230
can you do lined belts with snaps to allow the buckles to be changed in and out?
post #56 of 230
I'm interested in the belt too.
post #57 of 230
Charlie, me too.
post #58 of 230
Great essay MoK. Compare it with this: I'll buy British.
post #59 of 230
I remember there was one in the centre of the souk in Bahrein as well years ago. It reminds me of this site though the smell was not that bad.
post #60 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkDerm View Post

can you do lined belts with snaps to allow the buckles to be changed in and out?

Hi ThinkDerm,

I don't think the lined and raised would work well with snaps or chicago screws - the design has been developed for a stitched in buckle. Maybe drop me a PM though and we'll see if we can work something out for you

Charlie
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