or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Photo essay on Britain's last oak bark tannery
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Photo essay on Britain's last oak bark tannery - Page 16

post #226 of 230
When you burnish the edges, do you use gum tragacanth/gum dragon to harden/help compress the fibres?
post #227 of 230
No, we use a burnishable dye thats applied and then burnished in to the fibres. The friction/heat and pressure of the burnishing process helps bind the fibres in the edge and produces a really nice slick edge which we then seal with a top dressing. In something like the lined and raised the join between the two pieces of leather becomes invisible when done properly.

Charlie
post #228 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equus Leather View Post

It is and I agree. History and our tradition teaches us many obviously correct things like never stitching across a strap for e.g., but if we don't question the minutiae and look at the empirical evidence from our own work we don't progress. I still maintain the only real effect of creasing in bridgework is decorative, but given part of the joy of something as arcane as what we both do is we can argue about the details till the cows come home its fine we don't agree. I suspect however there are better places for discussing it!
Charlie

Charlie, I will not pursue this further and bore the good guys at SF with such topics or challenge your excellent abilities, but this interesting thread has delved into tradition somewhat! I simply wanted to throw in my four penneth worth. Please keep up the entertainment. Best Tim
post #229 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by james_timothy View Post

Oh no, this is a great conversation.
How else are we supposed to learn about the wonderful minutiae and technology of leather working?
I only understood about a third of Tim Hardy's post...

Sorry if my post became too technical, but with nearly 30 years at this game since training at the Cordwainers college in London (Leathergoods, Saddlery, Light goods/ Wallets, Case making, Luggage etc) and having subsequently made a wide variety of leather goods with a passion for tradition and maintaining the core skills, one becomes a little obsessed by it all.
For example, I have just finished recreating an old fishing reel case which involved a whole host of techniques too numerous to mention here but the full story will appear on my new blog soon.
Any time you have a question that needs answering, feel free to run it by me.
Best, Tim
post #230 of 230
Hi All,

I thought I'd let the Bakers leather fans know that we've just got in some of their Dark Stain harness leather. Its lovely - very like the Australian Nut but mid brown rather than red brown, a little more dense and more substantial at 5mm. I've been trying to develop a really nice heavy weight belt (for this) for ages that isn't wooden and this is just right, I'm really pleased with it. If anyone would like to see a sample I'm more than happy to send off cuts out as ever, just drop me a PM.

Some pics

233

233

Charlie
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Photo essay on Britain's last oak bark tannery