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3 roll 2.5 with peaked lapels - Page 2

post #16 of 84
I thought about it, then thought better of it. Something just doesn't sit right with me, but it may just be the peak...you rock those well.
post #17 of 84
This is a 3 roll 2.5 peak lapel DB or 6 x 2.5 if you prefer

6x2andahalf-1.jpg
post #18 of 84
No peaks on SB except DJs, for the love of all things holy
post #19 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post


This?DSC_0055.jpg

This to me look like a complete three roll two.
post #20 of 84
I have one peak SB (below) and one peak DB blazer. The SB is a three roll 2.5 ...

2vl6sz6.jpg

4bo4.jpg

White picque cotton.
post #21 of 84
What on earth is a 3 roll 2.5 and a 3 roll 2? puzzled.gif
post #22 of 84
A single breasted three button jacket can come in three forms.

A 'hard three' which almost all my jackets and suits are, think English sixties mod look. Top and middle button should be fastened.

A 'three roll 2.5' where only the middle button is fastened. The lapels then roll in a gracious curve from the middle button upwards into the lower portion of the lapel. this is a classic style and probably the most common.

A 'three roll 2' in which only the middle button is fastened but the lapel above the middle button does not roll in gracefully as above, but is instead ironed flat so that the top button is hidden behind the folded pressed lapel and the top buttonhole is visible in the lower quarter of the lapel. This somehow became a trend in ivy league suits and is continued to this day by those who like that vintage look. It has essentially become a two-button jacket but with the top button and buttonhole adornments. Personally I don't like this look at all but I'm not from America where the style began and continues.

Anyway this explains the oft-quoted mantra when it comes to buttoning three button jackets. From the top down:

Sometimes
Always
Never

Hope this helps.
post #23 of 84
^ What you are describing are not differences in the cut or construction at all.

There is actually no such thing as either a 3-to-2 or 3-to-2.5, except as iGent myth. A coat is bridled so that it is constructed to button-two or button-three. There are no in between ways of bridling a coat.

However, you can make up a button-two coat and then add in an extra decorative buttonhole at the top. In fact, you can do retro fit any button-two coat you have with just such a "show button". You will need to know how to make buttonholes and you may need to cut away a bit of the haircloth at the roll line above the second buttonhole. You then add a decorative show button, to make your button-two coat one with an extra show button. The traditional British term is then "button-two show-one". This means that the coat has been cut/constructed as a button-two coat but the phrase "show one" indicates that the top button is purely for show only. The misleading American term is "3-to-2", but it is wrong because it isn't a button-three coat at all - but rather a button-two coat with an extra decorative "show button" added in, almost as an afterthought.

Most three button lounge coats are bridled to button-three. If left unbuttoned, you will see that the natural tendency of the lapel is to roll to the top button. However, fashion may dictate that you leave the top button unfastened (I say fashion because at times it has been fashionable to button the top button). This doesn't change the fact that the coat is still constructed to button-three. It is not a button-two coat with an extra decorative show button on the lapel. It is a button-three coat on which the top button has been left unfastened.

In short, all lounges are cut, constructed/bridled to button-one, two, three or four. You can add in as many other decorative show buttons above the bridle as you want, and it won't change this.
post #24 of 84
I agree with Sator. All of this 'roll' stuff is nonsense. It is either a two or three button coat with varying lapel rolls dependent on the characteristics of the material and the construction.
post #25 of 84
^ I think you are really missing the point, Sator.
post #26 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post


Would you mind posting a picture of the completed project? Sounds interesting.

I will ask the client if he minds.
post #27 of 84
There is a difference in construction between a roll 2 of 2.5 though I believe the terms aren't used by noninternet tailors.

On a 2.5 the tape which largely dictates lapel shape ends higher up than it would on a 2 button. In that case it would look silly without the show button.

I the OP, I think it can be fine. I think it depends more on the cloth than anything.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sator View Post

^ What you are describing are not differences in the cut or construction at all.

There is actually no such thing as either a 3-to-2 or 3-to-2.5, except as iGent myth. A coat is bridled so that it is constructed to button-two or button-three. There are no in between ways of bridling a coat.

However, you can make up a button-two coat and then add in an extra decorative buttonhole at the top. In fact, you can do retro fit any button-two coat you have with just such a "show button". You will need to know how to make buttonholes and you may need to cut away a bit of the haircloth at the roll line above the second buttonhole. You then add a decorative show button, to make your button-two coat one with an extra show button. The traditional British term is then "button-two show-one". This means that the coat has been cut/constructed as a button-two coat but the phrase "show one" indicates that the top button is purely for show only. The misleading American term is "3-to-2", but it is wrong because it isn't a button-three coat at all - but rather a button-two coat with an extra decorative "show button" added in, almost as an afterthought.

Most three button lounge coats are bridled to button-three. If left unbuttoned, you will see that the natural tendency of the lapel is to roll to the top button. However, fashion may dictate that you leave the top button unfastened (I say fashion because at times it has been fashionable to button the top button). This doesn't change the fact that the coat is still constructed to button-three. It is not a button-two coat with an extra decorative show button on the lapel. It is a button-three coat on which the top button has been left unfastened.

In short, all lounges are cut, constructed/bridled to button-one, two, three or four. You can add in as many other decorative show buttons above the bridle as you want, and it won't change this.
post #28 of 84
If you're going to do peaked lapels, I think you should stick to one or two buttons. 3/2 or 3/2.5 is a more relaxed, slightly whimsical setup. Totally incongruent with the formality and sharpness of peaks.
post #29 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

If you're going to do peaked lapels, I think you should stick to one or two buttons. 3/2 or 3/2.5 is a more relaxed, slightly whimsical setup. Totally incongruent with the formality and sharpness of peaks.

Agreed, but for different reasons - I think peaks look best when they have a nice long lapel line, especially since they are usually slightly broader than notches. IMO you have less headroom for raising the gorge because on peaks IMO a too-high gorge arguably looks more stupid than a too-high gorge on a notch. So that leaves the buttoning point.
post #30 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post

^ I think you are really missing the point, Sator.

The actual point being....?

Please enlighten this fool smile.gif
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