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In this thread you ask how to behave in restaurants and other locations, and people who have been... - Page 4

post #46 of 481
Mafoo: the nice thing with friends (well in theory) is that you can be forward with them. Just explain the situation and see what can satisfy both couples, no need for convoluted approaches.
post #47 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Not bad at all, except for the middle one. I would not feel comfortable telling someone that the food they like is not worth the money.

You had said the scene was more important to them than the food? Work on that angle. "Sure, the scene is great but I think they overcharge for the food because of it. I'm more in the mood for a great meal than a great scene tonight..."
post #48 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

I would not feel comfortable telling someone that the food they like is not worth the money.

Are you joking?
post #49 of 481

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Why did you put your cutlery in the off position to begin with? Your faux pas, not the waiter's.
 


Really? You leave your knife and fork at rest until everyone is finished?  Never done that.

 

lefty

post #50 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

 


Really? You leave your knife and fork at rest until everyone is finished?  Never done that.

 

lefty


Why does this make a difference? Waiters should never clear plates until all are finished, right?
post #51 of 481
My mother, who always has had decent etiquette, recently began resting her elbows on restaurant tables and taking unimportant phone calls when eating with a group. Am I justified in implying that it may be a sign of early onset Alzheimers in order to curb the odd behavior? If not, am I justified in saying it just for the laugh? Thanks in advance.
post #52 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

My mother, who always has had decent etiquette, recently began resting her elbows on restaurant tables and taking unimportant phone calls when eating with a group. Am I justified in implying that it may be a sign of early onset Alzheimers in order to curb the odd behavior? If not, am I justified in saying it just for the laugh? Thanks in advance.

laugh.gif
Perhaps your mother is no longer interested in these groups dinners
post #53 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

 


Really? You leave your knife and fork at rest until everyone is finished?  Never done that.

 

lefty


it depends no? lets say one person only orders one dish and the other three order 2 dishes.
post #54 of 481
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post

My mother, who always has had decent etiquette, recently began resting her elbows on restaurant tables and taking unimportant phone calls when eating with a group. Am I justified in implying that it may be a sign of early onset Alzheimers in order to curb the odd behavior? If not, am I justified in saying it just for the laugh? Thanks in advance.

My mother started to be this way after my father died. I think she spends too many meals alone now to care, but I am totally going with the Alzheimers comment to scare her back into shape.
post #55 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post


My mother started to be this way after my father died. I think she spends too many meals alone now to care, but I am totally going with the Alzheimers comment to scare her back into shape.

My guess is that it really is about meals alone, happens a lot with old people.
post #56 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post


My mother started to be this way after my father died. I think she spends too many meals alone now to care, but I am totally going with the Alzheimers comment to scare her back into shape.

Definite win with win-win potential I figure.
post #57 of 481
what do you do about people staring?

I realize if you order something interesting (especially an indulgent dessert) you're going to get looks. My wife and I get this a lot in Europe/Asia/ and most notably older people in general.

Sure a nice long glance is fine, but damn a lot of the time people will glare at you while your eating.

also what do you do when your friends are out and you're in your work clothes/specific uniform? - specifically in my case I'll be in scrubs and running late and do want to hang out, but I don't want to commute back and forth just to change into regular clothes (i'm already late as is - and don't want to meet up with a group in the middle/finishing eating dinner or when they already have 2-4 drinks in them). I'm married and don't really care about looking good for other women, so when I have old friends who want to meet up in a casual restaurant/bar I'll just go straight in in scrubs and at least say hi.
post #58 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

what do you do about people staring?

I realize if you order something interesting (especially an indulgent dessert) you're going to get looks. My wife and I get this a lot in Europe/Asia/ and most notably older people in general.

Sure a nice long glance is fine, but damn a lot of the time people will glare at you while your eating.

also what do you do when your friends are out and you're in your work clothes/specific uniform? - specifically in my case I'll be in scrubs and running late and do want to hang out, but I don't want to commute back and forth just to change into regular clothes (i'm already late as is - and don't want to meet up with a group in the middle/finishing eating dinner or when they already have 2-4 drinks in them). I'm married and don't really care about looking good for other women, so when I have old friends who want to meet up in a casual restaurant/bar I'll just go straight in in scrubs and at least say hi.

1) Can't do anything about people staring, let them do it and politely ignore them (no nose thumbing). If they take pictures though you can throw plates at them.
2) Keep a change of clothes, no one wants to see you in scrubs. It can be a tee shirt, jeans and sneakers, how hard is it to have that laying around?
post #59 of 481
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

what do you do about people staring?

I realize if you order something interesting (especially an indulgent dessert) you're going to get looks. My wife and I get this a lot in Europe/Asia/ and most notably older people in general.

Sure a nice long glance is fine, but damn a lot of the time people will glare at you while your eating.

also what do you do when your friends are out and you're in your work clothes/specific uniform? - specifically in my case I'll be in scrubs and running late and do want to hang out, but I don't want to commute back and forth just to change into regular clothes (i'm already late as is - and don't want to meet up with a group in the middle/finishing eating dinner or when they already have 2-4 drinks in them). I'm married and don't really care about looking good for other women, so when I have old friends who want to meet up in a casual restaurant/bar I'll just go straight in in scrubs and at least say hi.

At a restaurant in France recently, we were scolded by a man (middle aged) at the table next to us for not taking pictures. He turned to us and proclaimed that we were missing half the fun of dining. This was while a saddle of lamb was being carved for us at the table, and it was obvious that he was upset that he ordered differently, so I, somewhat snarkily, offered that he should feel free to take his own pictures of our lamb. To my surprise, he smiled broadly, stood up and started snapping.
post #60 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post


At a restaurant in France recently, we were scolded by a man (middle aged) at the table next to us for not taking pictures. He turned to us and proclaimed that we were missing half the fun of dining. This was while a saddle of lamb was being carved for us at the table, and it was obvious that he was upset that he ordered differently, so I, somewhat snarkily, offered that he should feel free to take his own pictures of our lamb. To my surprise, he smiled broadly, stood up and started snapping.

Civilization of the commentary; we take more time documenting and discussing/debriefing our lives than actually living it. I think Kahneman *gasp* said some good stuff regarding that.
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Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › In this thread you ask how to behave in restaurants and other locations, and people who have been out in public answer.