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post #316 of 481
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Originally Posted by curzon View Post

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Originally Posted by lefty View Post

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I lived in India for a while and ate with my hands all the time - a scoop of rice with various sauces on a banana leaf.  I miss it.  When you're in a new culture, adapt to the local customs.  Seriously, this stuff is not that hard to figure out.

 

 

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"When you have finished eating place the fork and the knife in the 4:20 position (shown below) or across the middle of the plate, parallel to the edge of the table with the handles to the right and ending on the edge, not hanging over.  Either way is correct. The fork will be nearest you with the tines turned up. The sharp side of the knife points toward you as well. Why, you ask, is this important? Because this simple universal act signals to the staff, waiter or otherwise, that you have finished your meal."

 

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Do I care if someone uses the wrong fork or water glass?  No.  But there are people that I no longer eat with due to their table manners--talking with a mouth full of food, plate lickers, that kind of thing.   To be honest, I'm over fine dining and when I travel I focus on street food or small local places rather that the hot restaurant of the moment or city.  Drives my wife crazy.  

 

lefty


I'm cool w/ using your hands at an Indian or Arab place. Takes some dexterity to tear the naan using only one hand, doesn't it? Thing about India is that all the common restaurants have sinks right in the dining area where everyone washes up before eating. How many people in the west wash their hands before eating? I reckon not that many.

And I hope everyone minds their Ps and Qs with napkins, e.g., knows where to put the napkin when you leave the table briefly during the meal and where to put it when you're finished and have left the table.

Where do you put them?
post #317 of 481

Wash before and after.  Love to find some good banana leaf in SF.

 

There's also Ethiopian injera as a tasty hand food.

 

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lefty

post #318 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post


What's unclear about my post? I made a comment earlier about people going to high end dining place for purely positional reasons (declaration of status/distinction) to which Pio reacted (basically by calling me more snobbish than him/declaring a higher status) and since I know what I initially said was a joke but entirely inexact I gave a valid answer in my latest post.

While you of course understood I was pointing out an even higher level of caste you misunderstood the practical implications (probably due to your inability to understand life at a level or two below you (yet seem to identify quiet well with levels more in line with my upbringing.)) Scheduling and timing. The very bottom and the very top have much more flexible schedules than do the middle so it completely makes sense to schedule some of the location dependent events. It's not like a regular Friday night where you can decide that afternoon where to hit for dinner and drinks and with whom.
post #319 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by curzon View Post


I'm cool w/ using your hands at an Indian or Arab place. Takes some dexterity to tear the naan using only one hand, doesn't it? Thing about India is that all the common restaurants have sinks right in the dining area where everyone washes up before eating. How many people in the west wash their hands before eating? I reckon not that many.

And I hope everyone minds their Ps and Qs with napkins, e.g., knows where to put the napkin when you leave the table briefly during the meal and where to put it when you're finished and have left the table.

Ahh India, a country where nobody has had a solid bowel movement in 200 years.
post #320 of 481
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post


Not at all uncommon in Italy - fare la scarpetta. I was told to do this by my Roman hosts earlier this summer and they were pleased when I did it on my own by the second or third meal (being a foreigner is a lot like being a toddler - it takes very little to please the crowd).
See here and here
Perhaps at a really formal meal it would be considered too rustic, but I don't know. I got the impression that it is generally very traditional. Maybe iammatt knows whether it is ever inappropriate or in what regions it is more or less common.

I've seen people in Italy do it in a gross way, but everybody has done it everywhere I've been. I am of the mind that you can basically do anything if you do it in a way so as not to offend anybody else. Elbows out, vigorously scrubbing the plate with your head six inches away probably doesn't go over in some places, but I believe the plate cleaning is a general rule there. In France often as well. Thanks for the saying. I had forgotten it.
post #321 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post


I've seen people in Italy ... ...In France often as well. Thanks for the saying. I had forgotten it.

except of germany, it can be found throughout europe with italy and france in the leading position.
post #322 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzl View Post


except of germany, it can be found throughout europe with italy and france in the leading position.


Actually I've seen people doing it here in Germany, too. I really don't know what's wrong about it. Maybe it's more appropriate in a low-midscale restaurant, but it simply shows that one likes the sauce. It's not like you're licking it clean.
post #323 of 481
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Originally Posted by impolyt_one View Post

However, I am surprised that not many people in this thread have asked much about Asian dining etiquette - there are a lot of things to know, especially with Japanese food. The order in which you pick up your chopsticks, with which hand, in what position, the proper grip for your rice bowl, proper grip for your miso soup, ways to eat sushi, this stuff isn't gonna come naturally. It would make a good impression if you were to say, go on a business trip to Japan and eat with people; eating Asian food in Asia with tourists is fun because you get to show people something new, but at the same time, table manners and the western approach to eating Asian food can be tough to watch sometimes. Korean food is a tough one to watch foreign people eat, because of the communal soups and hotpots, the admittedly difficult to use thin metal chopsticks, etc.

I think some of this is tongue in cheek, but I would actually like to know more about Asian etiquette.

Things I think I know:

Sushi should be eaten in one bite.
Don't take a piece of sushi from communal plate with the eating end of your chopsticks. Should you use the back end?
Don't make a mix of wasabi and soy and soak your sushi in it.
Slurping is not impolite.

That's about all I got. In all seriousness, can you tell me anymore?

I was at a korean place on Friday and was unsure how to handle the communal dishes and the pieces of meat that were much large than bite size. We only had out chopsticks - should I just grab what I want out of the bowl, or should I use the back or what? There were some pieces of meat that were much larger than a bite, should I bite and tear, or try to stuff the whole thing into my mouth?
post #324 of 481
This thread reminds me of an interesting exchange I saw at a restaurant a few years ago. The establishment in question was Daniel in Manhattan, which is, I believe, a 3-star Michelin. Sitting at the table next to me was a gentleman with his wife. I'm not usually one to assume, but I'm guessing they were from out of town based solely on how he was dressed - untucked Hawaiian/Tommy Bahama style shirt (with the collar draped over the lapels of his sack-ish sportcoat), jeans, and cowboy boots of some sort (some things, once seen, cannot be unseen). He ordered a bottled beer, and after it was brought to the table, he asked for an ice bucket. I believe the waiter was somewhat puzzled by this, and I'm not sure what the brief exchange was like, but this patron then became very irate and said (quite rudely) something to the effect of, "let me make this very simple for you, bring me a bucket and fill it with ice so I can put my beer in it!" Any etiquette violations here?
post #325 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by antikantian View Post

This thread reminds me of an interesting exchange I saw at a restaurant a few years ago. The establishment in question was Daniel in Manhattan, which is, I believe, a 3-star Michelin. Sitting at the table next to me was a gentleman with his wife. I'm not usually one to assume, but I'm guessing they were from out of town based solely on how he was dressed - untucked Hawaiian/Tommy Bahama style shirt (with the collar draped over the lapels of his sack-ish sportcoat), jeans, and cowboy boots of some sort (some things, once seen, cannot be unseen). He ordered a bottled beer, and after it was brought to the table, he asked for an ice bucket. I believe the waiter was somewhat puzzled by this, and I'm not sure what the brief exchange was like, but this patron then became very irate and said (quite rudely) something to the effect of, "let me make this very simple for you, bring me a bucket and fill it with ice so I can put my beer in it!" Any etiquette violations here?

I'm kinda surprised they seated him dressed like that, unless he was some kind of vip. How bad does someone need to be dressed to be turned away from a fine dining establishment.
post #326 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by antikantian View Post

This thread reminds me of an interesting exchange I saw at a restaurant a few years ago. The establishment in question was Daniel in Manhattan, which is, I believe, a 3-star Michelin. Sitting at the table next to me was a gentleman with his wife. I'm not usually one to assume, but I'm guessing they were from out of town based solely on how he was dressed - untucked Hawaiian/Tommy Bahama style shirt (with the collar draped over the lapels of his sack-ish sportcoat), jeans, and cowboy boots of some sort (some things, once seen, cannot be unseen). He ordered a bottled beer, and after it was brought to the table, he asked for an ice bucket. I believe the waiter was somewhat puzzled by this, and I'm not sure what the brief exchange was like, but this patron then became very irate and said (quite rudely) something to the effect of, "let me make this very simple for you, bring me a bucket and fill it with ice so I can put my beer in it!" Any etiquette violations here?

This is hard to believe. It's far too contrived.
post #327 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post


This is hard to believe. It's far too contrived.

There might be a bit of sartorial hyperbole, but this more or less happened as written. The ice bucket exchange is almost verbatim as it happened. It was ridiculous, but that is the only reason I was even paying attention to the table, and also the only reason why I remember it at all.
post #328 of 481

Back to cutlery for a moment. Let's say you're prince-level royalty and visiting the colonies. You're taking lunch with some locals to show your common touch and as you finish your meal you place your knife and fork in the four o'clock position.  The waitress takes your plate but picks your fork up and hands it back to you whispering, "Save your fork, Duke.  There's pie."

 

Do you take it and place it back on the table?

 

lefty

 

post #329 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

"Save your fork, Duke.  There's pie."

I play along...save it and fork her later...after all, she is offering her pie.
post #330 of 481

Good answer but in this case the princeling is British so not exactly the "last of the red hot lovers" and the waitress is 60 years old and has a nameplate that reads "Madge."

 

lefty

 

P.S. check PM in a moment

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Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › In this thread you ask how to behave in restaurants and other locations, and people who have been out in public answer.