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post #286 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadly7 View Post


You whine too much about trivial shit.

Wine is not trivial.
post #287 of 481
Elbows on the table, ye or ne?

I do it frequently. The idea of sitting down for 1 hour + without your elbows on the table at at some point seems very awkward...
post #288 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennglock View Post

Elbows on the table, ye or ne?

I do it frequently. The idea of sitting down for 1 hour + without your elbows on the table at at some point seems very awkward...

I do it too. Not so great for the suit jacket though.
post #289 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post


Sure man, but what I am talking about is like when you see someone wiping down a glass table top. They will circle the plate with bread until its white again. Different from a little dip.

You really care about things like this?

I have noticed people doing it and I usually just joke with them that they must have really enjoyed it. No big deal
post #290 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by CouttsClient View Post


You really care about things like this?

I have noticed people doing it and I usually just joke with them that they must have really enjoyed it. No big deal

Its not that big of a deal, just awkward to watch. Its like someone finishing their wine and then hanging the glass over their mouth and shaking it for a final drop. It couldn't have been that good, let it go.
post #291 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post


Sure man, but what I am talking about is like when you see someone wiping down a glass table top. They will circle the plate with bread until its white again. Different from a little dip.

Not at all uncommon in Italy - fare la scarpetta. I was told to do this by my Roman hosts earlier this summer and they were pleased when I did it on my own by the second or third meal (being a foreigner is a lot like being a toddler - it takes very little to please the crowd).
See here and here
Perhaps at a really formal meal it would be considered too rustic, but I don't know. I got the impression that it is generally very traditional. Maybe iammatt knows whether it is ever inappropriate or in what regions it is more or less common.
Edited by dopey - 8/7/11 at 7:28pm
post #292 of 481

I can't fault this.  I was raised by Eastern European peasant farmers who lost family during the Ukrainian famine.  Food was never left on a plate.  My grandfather terrified me as a kid when he explained, "Food in the stomach is life; food thrown away is death.  Decide."  Okay, I choose life, grandpa.

 

May not do this at JG but as long as you don't make a scene about it, swipe away.

 

Is the word "cutlery" used across the US to describe eating utensils?  I was in Michigan and asked for cutlery and the waitress looked at me blankly.  I repeated the word but she shook her head.  Finally I said, "knife and fork" and she smiled and said, "You mean flatware."  I guess I did. 

 

lefty

post #293 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post


You've seen an adult do this?
Yes, in their own house. As has been mentioned many times in this thread, their house, their rules. I didn't really care.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

I witnessed a girl mop up a red wine Béarnaise at Le Bernardin with an olive rosemary loaf. Barbaric.
You should try travelling once in a while.
Quote:
Originally Posted by idfnl View Post


Its not that big of a deal, just awkward to watch. Its like someone finishing their wine and then hanging the glass over their mouth and shaking it for a final drop. It couldn't have been that good, let it go.
I've had many wines that were that good.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Is the word "cutlery" used across the US to describe eating utensils?  I was in Michigan and asked for cutlery and the waitress looked at me blankly.  I repeated the word but she shook her head.  Finally I said, "knife and fork" and she smiled and said, "You mean flatware."  I guess I did. 

 

lefty

I'm from Indiana, lived in Chicago, live in bumfuck Illinois, and have travelled in many places of the country. I've never seen anyone not know what the word cutlery meant. You just had a stupid waitress.
post #294 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

I'm from Indiana, lived in Chicago, live in bumfuck Illinois, and have travelled in many places of the country. I've never seen anyone not know what the word cutlery meant. You just had a stupid waitress.


It was Michigan.

 

lefty

 

post #295 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post


It was Michigan.

 

lefty

 


Yeah, but you asked if the word was used across the country or not.
post #296 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post


Not at all uncommon in Italy - fare la scarpetta. I was told to do this by my Roman hosts earlier this summer and they were pleased when I did it on my own by the second or third meal (being a foreigner is a lot like being a toddler - it takes very little to please the crowd).
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

I can't fault this.  I was raised by Eastern European peasant farmers who lost family during the Ukrainian famine.


Having spent many childhood summers in Europe I was exposed to this behavior as well. It just came across as kind of gross and stuck with me. There is something about a spotless plate that is not actually clean... I'm weird.

I respect poverty and fault nobody in that situation. But. Its the same as people growing up very poor to become millionaires and never ever spend a cent on anything.
post #297 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Is the word "cutlery" used across the US to describe eating utensils?  I was in Michigan and asked for cutlery and the waitress looked at me blankly.  I repeated the word but she shook her head.  Finally I said, "knife and fork" and she smiled and said, "You mean flatware."  I guess I did. 

 

lefty


Cutlery implies kitchen knives. I think the more common term is silverware.
post #298 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post

Yeah, but you asked if the word was used across the country or not.


Stupid waitress ... Michigan.

 

lefty

 

post #299 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Someone's out of control brat runs up to your table, grabs the edge of it, and goes to touch something on your table. The correct response is?

302.jpg
post #300 of 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

I can't fault this.  I was raised by Eastern European peasant farmers who lost family during the Ukrainian famine.  Food was never left on a plate.  My grandfather terrified me as a kid when he explained, "Food in the stomach is life; food thrown away is death.  Decide."  Okay, I choose life, grandpa.

 

May not do this at JG but as long as you don't make a scene about it, swipe away.

 

Is the word "cutlery" used across the US to describe eating utensils?  I was in Michigan and asked for cutlery and the waitress looked at me blankly.  I repeated the word but she shook her head.  Finally I said, "knife and fork" and she smiled and said, "You mean flatware."  I guess I did. 

 

lefty


I think it's an east coast/English thing. I grew up in Massachusetts and most in the Pacific NW looked at me cockeyed and said "What?" every time I said it.
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Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › In this thread you ask how to behave in restaurants and other locations, and people who have been out in public answer.