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Up-and-coming career paths? Going back to school

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I am finishing a college diploma in HR. I'm not exactly sold on working in HR, and have to finish my university degree in order to obtain the professional designation. Problem is, my half-finished degree is in English. My "old" plan was to finish the English degree and go to law school, but given the amount of advice against doing such a thing here, I've begun to reconsider.

So, if you had the opportunity to go back to school in your mid-twenties, what would you do? Math and spatial thought are weak areas for me, so areas like Engineering are out. The world of business doesn't appeal to me either. What up-and-coming career paths are opening up in today's day and age? I am considering getting into a trade, but am going to finish my degree regardless so I want it to be in something "profitable." Its not like I'm a teenager going to college for the first time and can afford to be directionless and get an arts degree just because - I would like to get the most bang for my buck out of my education, considering I'm mid-twenties already.

What did you get your education in, and where do you work now? What if you could do it over again?
post #2 of 8
I got my degree in Management Information Systems. Initially I paired MIS/Finance, but dropped Finance due to lack of interest and slight time constraint (It was most definitely do-able, but I was definitely not very disciplined about my scheduling). I currently work in the IT department of a F500 healthcare company (I interned there the summer before starting Senior year).

I really enjoyed my internship experience and content with current position but if I could do it over again, I would've either looked into Accounting or finish Finance degree (in addition to MIS, which I really liked) and looked into working in Advisory (big 4).

I'm curious though, what exactly does a diploma in HR entail? What did you learn in the courses? And ultimately what was your reason for choosing HR? Also, have you had any internships?
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
The diploma in HR gives you the necessary courses needed to write the test to attain the professional HR designation here in Ontario. I picked it since it was the least business-like of the business fields - I suck with numbers, accounting gives me nightmares, etc. but before I knew what HR was all about I figured I'd be a good "people person" and went into it. Little did I know its more working for the man than working for the people, but anyways... I have a mentorship coming up next semester which is basically job shadowing - its not an internship position, but people have gotten their foot in the door that way. Thus far I've basically learned about payroll, comp + benefits, recruitment and selection, ethics etc. basically, its common sense thrown into a course format. Entry level HR positions are little more than glorified data-entry spots. From what I've seen, HR is separate from the workings of the rest of the company - advancement in HR bumps you up the HR ladder, but not necessarily the company's ladder (decision making, strategic plan, etc) if that makes sense.

Either way, I have to go back to university to finish my degree in order to get the professional designation, so I am looking into getting something worthwhile as opposed to a shit-useless English degree.
post #4 of 8
Interested in health care at all? It seems like nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, etc are always in demand. Decent money and flexible hours.
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by jarude View Post

The diploma in HR gives you the necessary courses needed to write the test to attain the professional HR designation here in Ontario. I picked it since it was the least business-like of the business fields - I suck with numbers, accounting gives me nightmares, etc. but before I knew what HR was all about I figured I'd be a good "people person" and went into it. Little did I know its more working for the man than working for the people, but anyways... I have a mentorship coming up next semester which is basically job shadowing - its not an internship position, but people have gotten their foot in the door that way. Thus far I've basically learned about payroll, comp + benefits, recruitment and selection, ethics etc. basically, its common sense thrown into a course format. Entry level HR positions are little more than glorified data-entry spots. From what I've seen, HR is separate from the workings of the rest of the company - advancement in HR bumps you up the HR ladder, but not necessarily the company's ladder (decision making, strategic plan, etc) if that makes sense.

Either way, I have to go back to university to finish my degree in order to get the professional designation, so I am looking into getting something worthwhile as opposed to a shit-useless English degree.

Right on. I definitely understand what you mean by HR ladder being completely different from the rest of the company. I see the same structure within the company I'm with. It's too bad that you had a different understanding of HR's function in the corporate world, although I feel like if you would've done more initial research you could have saved yourself the trouble and come to the same conclusion much faster.

From what I can see, you've got a solid opportunity coming up with the mentorship, *especially* if you are able to network effectively. Also, might I ask why you are so averse to business? Not everything in business is math oriented... Since you say that you'd be a good people person, have you considered management role? In a management position or a project manager, while you may have the opportunity to dwell into technical matter, your main focus is in running a team. I don't know... just something to think about. You could certainly start in HR and make a move to the business side if the company allows.
post #6 of 8
hr is not an academic field, therefore an academic degree in it is worthless. if you're not learning hard skills, all degrees are worthless. just get a job and start hustling
post #7 of 8
HR is definitely a dead end field, as there is no way to break out of the silo. In my experience it is generally staffed by mediocre staff and managers, who know that it's a dead end and don't care, as long as they get a paycheck.
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennglock View Post

Interested in health care at all? It seems like nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, etc are always in demand. Decent money and flexible hours.

+1. I know several people who did career changes into this field and are happy.
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