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Number of shirts in rotation? - Page 5

Poll Results: Number of shirts in rotation?

Poll expired: Aug 28, 2011  
  • 15% (26)
    Less than 10
  • 34% (59)
    Between 10 and 20
  • 20% (35)
    Between 20 and 30
  • 14% (24)
    Between 30 and 40
  • 14% (25)
    Bigtimer; over 40 (and wear two a day)
169 Total Votes  
post #61 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonneker View Post


Wow - sure hope you like your work. Certainly decreases the need for casual shirts/wear.

I actually do like my work a lot; I certainly don't plan on working 5.5 days forever, though. Yeah, I only have two pairs of jeans that I wear on a regular basis.
post #62 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by E,TF View Post

I confess that I'm not really sure what a dress shirt is, or a sports shirt: I don't think I've ever heard the terms outside SF. Pretty much all my shirts are made identically now - semi-spread collar, two button rounded cuffs - and within the collection there is a spectrum of smartness based on cloth type/colour/pattern, but I would have a hard job dividing them into two distinct types - dress and sports. I suppose there are some that I would probably only wear with a sports coat or more casual suit - are they "sports shirts" then, and the rest "dress"?

I wear a shirt almost every day of my life, have done since I was six or seven. There are maybe ten or twenty days a year that I wear a polo or t-shirt instead. If you want a decent choice each morning and don't want to be doing your laundry all the time, I think it's nice to have about two dozen in total, if not more.

I'm not sure about others' definitions, but I suppose I think of "dress" shirts as those made in smarter fabrics, often plain or with only simple patterns (e.g. butcher's stripes, gingham, herringbone, etc.). "Sports" shirts are those that I think of as with more casual details (e.g. button-down collars, chest pocket, short-sleeves, "Western" details, etc.) and shirts made with "busier"/more casual patterns (e.g. paisley, madras, or plaid). I suppose there are some fuzzy zones; gingham check shirts can be made with "smart" or "casual" details, as can chambray, or linen. "Dress" shirts are those that you would unthinkingly wear with coat and tie; sports shirts are worn almost exclusively open collar, on the weekend, on a trip to the supermarket, taking your wee ones to the park, etc.
post #63 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by facet View Post


I actually do like my work a lot; I certainly don't plan on working 5.5 days forever, though. Yeah, I only have two pairs of jeans that I wear on a regular basis.

Interesting; good for you.
Quote:
Originally Posted by academe View Post


I'm not sure about others' definitions, but I suppose I think of "dress" shirts as those made in smarter fabrics, often plain or with only simple patterns (e.g. butcher's stripes, gingham, herringbone, etc.). "Sports" shirts are those that I think of as with more casual details (e.g. button-down collars, chest pocket, short-sleeves, "Western" details, etc.) and shirts made with "busier"/more casual patterns (e.g. paisley, madras, or plaid). I suppose there are some fuzzy zones; gingham check shirts can be made with "smart" or "casual" details, as can chambray, or linen. "Dress" shirts are those that you would unthinkingly wear with coat and tie; sports shirts are worn almost exclusively open collar, on the weekend, on a trip to the supermarket, taking your wee ones to the park, etc.

I think this describes it well.
post #64 of 72
Fellows, fellows ... we are forgetting 'country' shirts.* As I'm in tweed 75% of the time, these are among my favorites.

That said, there are times I'll wear a 'town' shirt of gingham or chambray with my tweed. As Academe notes, these can 'pass' while being worn on the other side of the tracks.

Well, that's not precisely what he said, but that is what I have elected to infer.

* When I write country ... that's in the English sense. I'm not talking something worn to a rodeo.
Edited by RSS - 8/10/11 at 9:24am
post #65 of 72
Thread Starter 
RSS: any chance you can elaborate or post a pic of a 'country shirt'?

I take it this is not it:

BK.jpg
post #66 of 72
Think tattersalls in flannel or brushed cotton.

Just found this one on the Internet: Tattersall.jpg

Or my shirt in this 'ensemble' ... IMG_1280.jpg
post #67 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post

Think tattersalls in flannel or brushed cotton.

Just found this one on the Internet: Tattersall.jpg

Or my shirt in this 'ensemble' ... IMG_1280.jpg
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post

Fellows, fellows ... we are forgetting 'country' shirts.* As I'm in tweed 75% of the time, these are among my favorites.

That said, there are times I'll wear a 'town' shirt of gingham or chambray with my tweed. As Academe notes, these can 'pass' while being worn on the other side of the tracks.

Well, that's not precisely what he said, but that is what I have elected to infer.

* When I write country ... that's in the English sense. I'm not talking something worn to a rodeo.

Is that shirt from Hoggs of Fife? We just drove by their shop in Cupar on our quest for some variegated periwinkles! happy.gif
post #68 of 72
The one in my ensemble is not ... the photo I found on the internet is. But I was thinking you might get a kick out of it were you to see it!

Should anyone want to check them out: http://www.hoggs.co.uk/index.php
post #69 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post

Think tattersalls in flannel or brushed cotton.

Just found this one on the Internet: Tattersall.jpg

Or my shirt in this 'ensemble' ... IMG_1280.jpg

Interesting - I thought these were in Academe's fuzzy zone, but agree that they should be in a category of their own.
post #70 of 72

Previously I'd call that a "sport shirt", but "country shirt" makes perfect sense to me now. 

post #71 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post

Previously I'd call that a "sport shirt", but "country shirt" makes perfect sense to me now. 


Though I suppose "sport," in the traditional British sense, really meant country pursuits (horse riding, shooting, deer stalking, fishing, etc.) then the terms are probably almost synonymous.
post #72 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by academe View Post


Though I suppose "sport," in the traditional British sense, really meant country pursuits (horse riding, shooting, deer stalking, fishing, etc.) then the terms are probably almost synonymous.

I think you are right: dress shirt = town shirt and sport shirt = country shirt. But I'm recalling the days when I first began to use British shirtmakers (New & Lingwood back in Sean O'Flynn's early days and then Bowring Arundel & Co. before Whittaker went off to Dege), the terms town shirt and country shirt were what I most often heard.

But the shirts I'm referencing -- be they town or country -- can easily be paired with a coat. There are, however, some shirts out there -- more than a few even made by Jermyn Street makers -- that I can't see being worn (not easily or well) with a coat. What do we call those shirts?
Edited by RSS - 8/12/11 at 5:42am
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