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Shoe trees - Page 3

post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Gatsby View Post

Cedar is the way to go if at all possible.

i'm very happy with my beech wood trees and would never consider cedar for good shoes. imo, it's just a cheap alternative.
post #32 of 53


Now I feel misguided. My  concern is precisely the same. Let them dry overnight or insert the trees ASAP?. If letting them dry overnight is the answer, and given fair weather, should I leave them in a well ventilated place (semi-outdoor) or indoors/closet? Thanks. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dinosarti View Post



A charming tale. I give.

I hear you on the coated wood. I have bare cedar in all of mine. My only thought is that I let the shoes air dry over night before I insert the tree. It is my "tradition" and yes, it is hard to break...biggrin.gif


 

post #33 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicguy View Post

I disagree with your assertions. How does wood dissipate moisture? Is there some kind of void in wood that makes it go away?
The moisture gets sucked up into the wood. Then the wood dries out. Where does the moisture go to dry it out? It goes back into the shoes.
No way am I pouring water over my nice shoes!

Think of unfinished wood as a moisture sink, similar to the aluminum heat sink on the CPU in your computer. The wooden shoe tree is much more porous that the leather of the shoe, and there is 10 times as much wood mass in the shoe tree than there is leather mass in the shoe. The cellular structure of wood also allows it to absorb moisture much better than the cellular structure of leather.

The wood absorbs the moisture from the leather due to the differences in moisture absorption abilities of the two materials. The wood then dissipates the moisture across the larger mass of the shoe tree and it evaporates into the air the shoe tree is exposed to at the shoe opening. Just basic physics.

Because leather is more pliable when wet, and most shoe trees use spring tensioning, some shoe manufactures suggest waiting for a brief period after wear before placing a shoe tree in the shoe. Unless your feet sweat a lot this is typically not a problem however. If fact you want a slight stretching effect, so that the creases put in the leather when walking as smoothed back out somewhat.

I have 10 year old shoes that look like they are a month old (if you don’t look at the soles), and I credit that to good leather maintenance and consistent use of shoe trees.
post #34 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post

Think of unfinished wood as a moisture sink, similar to the aluminum heat sink on the CPU in your computer. The wooden shoe tree is much more porous that the leather of the shoe, and there is 10 times as much wood mass in the shoe tree than there is leather mass in the shoe. The cellular structure of wood also allows it to absorb moisture much better than the cellular structure of leather.
The wood absorbs the moisture from the leather due to the differences in moisture absorption abilities of the two materials. The wood then dissipates the moisture across the larger mass of the shoe tree and it evaporates into the air the shoe tree is exposed to at the shoe opening. Just basic physics.
Because leather is more pliable when wet, and most shoe trees use spring tensioning, some shoe manufactures suggest waiting for a brief period after wear before placing a shoe tree in the shoe. Unless your feet sweat a lot this is typically not a problem however. If fact you want a slight stretching effect, so that the creases put in the leather when walking as smoothed back out somewhat.
I have 10 year old shoes that look like they are a month old (if you don’t look at the soles), and I credit that to good leather maintenance and consistent use of shoe trees.

Thanks for the delayed response. I follow your line of reasoning. I, of course, use shoe trees in all of my leather shoes. I just didn't understand the theory behind using wood. Then again, my feet don't sweat much, unless I'm not wearing socks.
post #35 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cylon View Post

Cedar is not native to Europe, so Europeans tend to use Beech which is.



I think you're referring to that aromatic red cedar. There's also other cedars like Spanish cedar used for cigar boxes because it doesn't have a really strong scent and it's more subtle. I think that some of my very old chests use it and it still retains that nice smell but subtle not like the red variety. And yes, they do use beech, alder, lime (linden) etc in England but that's no reason they can't import the red cedar just like people import other products. Afterall, they use mahogany and other woods for furniture that are not native to an area.

 

 

post #36 of 53
I have a quick question. I posted this in the other shoe care thread but haven't got a reply yet....

Earlier this week I approached a cobbler to have the rubber quarter of my shoe heels restored and it was pointed out to me that my cedar shoe tree was actually stretching the heels backward due to the rearward pressure exerted by the springs.

I was then recommended a Dasco shoe tree which I could adjust the shoe tree length by turning the rear half clockwise or counter-clockwise to adjust the pressure length-wise in the shoe.

Now, I probably know that there is some commercial interest in trying to flog his wares, but I'm just wondering if there is any truth to the fact that your usual spring loaded shoe tree will end up streching the heels backwards resulting in a loose fitting heel over time?
post #37 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3ff3z8e View Post

I have a quick question. I posted this in the other shoe care thread but haven't got a reply yet....
Earlier this week I approached a cobbler to have the rubber quarter of my shoe heels restored and it was pointed out to me that my cedar shoe tree was actually stretching the heels backward due to the rearward pressure exerted by the springs.
I was then recommended a Dasco shoe tree which I could adjust the shoe tree length by turning the rear half clockwise or counter-clockwise to adjust the pressure length-wise in the shoe.
Now, I probably know that there is some commercial interest in trying to flog his wares, but I'm just wondering if there is any truth to the fact that your usual spring loaded shoe tree will end up streching the heels backwards resulting in a loose fitting heel over time?

I have been using shoe trees for decades without problem. A properly sized shoe tree will not stretch the heel anymore than wearing and walking in the shoe on a regular basis will.

Unless the shoe trees you have are too large for your shoes, the normal spring tension of a shoe tree is typically not strong enough to deform the internal heel counter, or stretch the quarters lengthwise to any noticeable degree.

Keep in mind however that leather can, and does, stretch. As the shoe “breaks in” over time the leather is stretching where it can to accommodate your foot shape and gait. Eventually, over time, the leather wears out to a point where the shoe needs to be discarded or refurbished.

Shoe trees actually help keep the leather from breaking down too quickly by minimizing the depth of the creases in the upper caused by walking in the shoe over time (as well as removing perspiration). There needs to be enough tension in the shoe trees to minimize the existing creases in the upper each time the shoe is put away. The shoe tree should not be so tight as to hold the leather taunt, as that would indeed stretch the shoe, but rather enough to relax the creases in the upper slightly (mostly around the shoe where the ball of your foot flexes).

I do have a pair of twist tension shoe trees, and while I think they are very nice, I simply twist them until I feel tension similar to what a spring tensioned shoe tree would provide.

Ideally, there should be no tension in the shoe tree, as the best shoe tree is a cast of the last the shoe was built on, and fits the shoe perfectly (bespoke shoes come with trees like this). However, even then as the leather of the shoe begins to crease, the tree helps smooth it back out by conforming it to its original shape.

Theoretically a shoe tree that allows for user adjustable tensioning would be better than one with a preset tension (spring). For example a “Large” pre-tensioned shoe tree is going to fit tighter in a size 10 shoe than it is in a size 11.5 shoe (all US size references), but you can get spring loaded shoe trees in up to 5 different sizes (each only spanning a size and a half to 2 sizes).

There is also the nose cone (front end) fit factor of the shoe tree shape versus the shape of the last the shoe was constructed on. There are a variety of nose cone shapes, as well as split toe tensioning techniques, in the various shoe trees out there. Because of this (and other factors) there is no consistent, or defined, tension reference for a shoe tree in a shoe.

Because there is no known tension reference (and it would be difficult to measure even if there was), all you can do with a twist tension tree is to tighten it until you feel resistance, and then a little more, until the creases are slightly lessened. That is a pretty arbitrary measurement of tension, but somewhat more accurate than a pre tensioned (spring loaded) shoe tree.

The more closely the shoe tree fits the original shape of the shoe, the better it will be for the shoe overall. However, the difference between ideal and damaging is rather broad. A properly sized, spring loaded, shoe tree should not damage your shoes.

I own about a half dozen different shoe tree models, but personally I prefer the spring loaded shoe trees that have the larger heel piece and pivot from the middle with a knob (like the “Washburn”). I find they are easier to put in and take out, and cause less wear on the shoe.
post #38 of 53
Thanks for your input glenjay, really do appreciate it. Will it make a big difference though if I used Size 9 Shoetrees for Size 8.5G (Wide-fit) shoes? All most all of my shoe trees are from Herring Shoes as are most of my shoes.

They are MOstly Size 9 Cedars and also Premier Shoe Trees:-

http://www.herringshoes.co.uk/product-list.php?brandid=6&catid=63
post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3ff3z8e View Post

Thanks for your input glenjay, really do appreciate it. Will it make a big difference though if I used Size 9 Shoetrees for Size 8.5G (Wide-fit) shoes? All most all of my shoe trees are from Herring Shoes as are most of my shoes.
They are MOstly Size 9 Cedars and also Premier Shoe Trees:-
http://www.herringshoes.co.uk/product-list.php?brandid=6&catid=63

According to the Herring site you are using the correct tree size for your shoe size. You should be fine.
post #40 of 53
Where do you guys recommend buying shoe trees? How important is it to get a shoe tree whose shape matches the shape of the shoe? Ideally I would like to spend under $50.
post #41 of 53

If your shoes are really wet, you are far better off stuffing newspaper in them for a while, and not putting your shoe trees until later. Actually newspaper does a reasonable job full stop, if you don't have any trees. You will also find plenty of people insisting that you need a shoe-tree for every shoe, but my dad (and most people I know of his generation who kept their shoes going for decades), only ever had one or two pairs, which he used for the few hours after he took off any pair of shoes and then for the next, and so on...

post #42 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by imperaman View Post

Where do you guys recommend buying shoe trees? How important is it to get a shoe tree whose shape matches the shape of the shoe? Ideally I would like to spend under $50.

Jos A Bank has sales pretty frequently. I usually get them at half off ($12.50 per pair) but they sometimes have a "buy one get two free" so it was $25 for three pairs icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

These are pretty good quality too, nice rounded heel. They do say JAB though tongue.gif
post #43 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3ff3z8e View Post

Thanks for your input glenjay, really do appreciate it. Will it make a big difference though if I used Size 9 Shoetrees for Size 8.5G (Wide-fit) shoes? All most all of my shoe trees are from Herring Shoes as are most of my shoes.
They are MOstly Size 9 Cedars and also Premier Shoe Trees:-
http://www.herringshoes.co.uk/product-list.php?brandid=6&catid=63

As long as there is still some "spring" left in the compression of the shoe tree as it enters the shoe, then you should be OK. What you want to avoid is "shoe horning" in a shoe tree that is too long for the shoe.

Mim
post #44 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by imperaman View Post

Where do you guys recommend buying shoe trees? How important is it to get a shoe tree whose shape matches the shape of the shoe? Ideally I would like to spend under $50.

Sometimes Costco carries them. Not sure if they've had any for years though.

http://www.cedarvillestore.com/default.aspx is a good option if you don't want to wait.
post #45 of 53
If you have a Nordstrom Rack near you, you can get the Woodlore Combination shoe tree for around $14.
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