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Taking up suit sleeves from the shoulder?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
I just came into possession of an Isaia suit that, unlike others I've purchased, has faux-button-hole stitching at the bottoms of the sleeves. The sleeves are still open on the inside and only tacked together at the very end, but there are those "buttonholes" there. The sleeves are too long, of course. So they'd need to be taken up, presumably from the shoulder. I've done this before with lesser suits (e.g., Vestimenta), but with an isaia, I've found myself wondering the following:

Sleeves are a pretty important seam in terms of construction, etc. Assuming I bring the suit to a quality alterations tailor, should I be concerned that I'm either violating the integrity of the suit or undermining its construction by having the sleeves detached and shortened? As I said, i've done it before and it's come out OK, but somehow the prospect of doing it to a more-expensive suit has made the stakes seem higher. Any thoughts?

TIA,
grim.
post #2 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by grimslade
Assuming I bring the suit to a quality alterations tailor
I would recommend using a bespoke tailor for this and any other major alteration. That said, the faux buttonhole stitching may be able to be removed without damaging the fabric.
post #3 of 24
If the buttonholes are fake (i.e. not cut through the sleeves and just sewn on the fabric), there is no need to alter from the sleevehead. Any tailor can remove the fake butthole stitching and the button, shorten the sleeve, and re-position the buttons and buttonholes
post #4 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203
If the buttonholes are fake (i.e. not cut through the sleeves and just sewn on the fabric), there is no need to alter from the sleevehead. Any tailor can remove the fake butthole stitching and the button, shorten the sleeve, and re-position the buttons and buttonholes
Exactly. Worst case, there is a mark on the cloth once the faux buttonhole thread is removed. If so, take the coat to a reweaver to have that fixed. All told, it will cost you less. And messing with the shoulders of any coat should always be a last resort.
post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks all. I suspect the stitching is of the sort that could be removed.
post #6 of 24
if the cloth is a plaid or a check then shorten from the bottom. the sleeve plaid must match the body plaid at the front of the armhole.
post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks. It's not. It's a "cord stripe." It has no horizontal element.
post #8 of 24
I had this discussion at NM yesterday. Why in the world do the manufacturers (Isaia, Brioni, Kiton, and Oxxford generally don't, but Zegna and others do) put stitched faux buttonholes on sleeves that they know will have to be altered??

First you need to remove the stitching. Than shorten the sleeves. Than the customer probably has a reasonable expectation that the faux buttonhole stitching will be replaced which it never is. So the customer is always feeling partially cheated.

And than you find the semimindless alterations tailor who tries to save two of the faux buttonholes and puts the buttons too close to the sleeve ending!

So much simpler to either put the buttons on with thread and leave the buttonholes off so that noone has an expectation that they will be replaced.

Perry
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkincy
I had this discussion at NM yesterday. Why in the world do the manufacturers (Isaia, Brioni, Kiton, and Oxxford generally don't, but Zegna and others do) put stitched faux buttonholes on sleeves that they know will have to be altered??

First you need to remove the stitching. Than shorten the sleeves. Than the customer probably has a reasonable expectation that the faux buttonhole stitching will be replaced which it never is. So the customer is always feeling partially cheated.

And than you find the semimindless alterations tailor who tries to save two of the faux buttonholes and puts the buttons too close to the sleeve ending!

So much simpler to either put the buttons on with thread and leave the buttonholes off so that noone has an expectation that they will be replaced.

Perry

I just received one of my Brioni's from Ben @ ehaberdasher, and it has the faux buttonholes. Same with the Isaia I ordered. My guess is that they come from a Euro store, so maybe that has something to do with it. Although there is a 2nd Brioni I am getting ready to order that has unfinished sleeves. Makes no sense.
post #10 of 24
Thread Starter 
Mine is also from Ben. I noticed that some of his Isaie (sorry) have basted sleeves, while a few have faux holes pre-sewn. I've also noticed that nearly all of Century 21's Isaie have pre-sewn holes, but most of those I see from other sources are basted w/o holes. I suspect, without having any real knowledge of the business, that this is done, when it is done, at the retailer's request. Perhaps there are retailers that don't want people to think a suit that costs what an Isaia costs is "unfinished," even though, as Perry points out, it's more trouble in the end?

Anyway, htat's my theory. I'll bring this suit by Wilfreds, probably, and try to convince them to do it from the bottom.
post #11 of 24
I actually paid a tailor $105 once to redo the sleeves and than sew faux buttonholes back on in the correct place. It looks so bad I have never worn that jacket and probably never will.

So it is probably best to pay the extra (I now pay $150 for a competent tailor to put in real buttonholes) and do the real buttonholes.

Perry
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkincy
I now pay $150 for a competent tailor to put in real buttonholes
Are you serious? I always thought that $10 per button was a ripoff (which I still pay) but $150 for buttonholes?
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by grimslade
Anyway, htat's my theory. I'll bring this suit by Wilfreds, probably, and try to convince them to do it from the bottom.
Wilfred won't need convincing. They'll know that it is how it should be done
post #14 of 24
Gentleman:

I am in need of an alterations tailor that still believes in hand work especially where quality hand work is better. The tailor I was using I thought was equal to a bespoke alterations tailor but he is doing less and less work. The tailor adjusted the collar and shoulders plus the front and rear balance before doing the sleeves. I like working sleeve buttons. Are there alteration tailors out there?
The tailor I used feels that people are not interested in the expense of hand work and he is now using machines to do all work, even button holes. I believe if the person does not use his skill all the time it takes longer to do each job. We would do three fitting.
Perhaps there are others that are looking for quality alterations and we could help their business. Any takers? I live in center New Jersey?
Thank you
Dale
post #15 of 24
I just had an Isaia suit altered for a deeper armhole and I think the tailor took off the sleeves in order to adjust armholes. I noticed when I picked up the finished suit, the ropping on the shoulders are more pronounced than before. Although its nothing major, but it kinda threw off the balance a bit.
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