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Does every man need a good quality black captoe? - Page 7

post #91 of 103

I say yes to the original question.

post #92 of 103
I almost never wear black shoes because I don't really like the color that much. However, should I be wearing black captoes to interviews with a navy suit?
post #93 of 103
^ Yes you can.

Although I prefer a burgundy or chocolate shoe with my navy pants, but if it was an important interview, my black park avenues will be my go-to shoes. I dunno, makes me look more serious and less foppish to a potential employer.
post #94 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Romo View Post

I almost never wear black shoes because I don't really like the color that much. However, should I be wearing black captoes to interviews with a navy suit?

Yes, whether or not you like them.

Unless you are being interviewed for a very high level position in which your professional judgement and advise is what you are being interviewed for. In that case you would be expected to wear whatever you deam most appropriate - and it better be good.

When being interviewed for entry level to middle management the expectation is that you should be a person who is willing to do as you are told to do on the job. And if you show up breaking the most obvious of rules you are sending absolutely the wrong message. Why take that risk?

I've interviewed quite a few job candidates over the years and you should realize that the person doing the interview has very little time to actually evaluate you - you are most likely one of ten people being interviewed for a position. Because of that lack of time many people use some 'shorthand' evaluation techniques. I have a three strikes, your out policy: 1.) Typos or grammer errors in resume or cover letter, 2.) Badly groomed fingernails, 3.) Shoes any color but black. Is it fair? Probably not really, but it certainly shows a generally 'lax' attention to detail and I gotta make decisions fairly quickly.
post #95 of 103
think captoe is overrrated. a long vamp a la a 3 eye Blucher or single monk works as well and is more versatile
post #96 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

think captoe is overrrated. a long vamp a la a 3 eye Blucher or single monk works as well and is more versatile

+1

Even an old fuddy duddy like me is happy to see you in a style other than captoe. But again, for interviews be very careful - you never know what will catch someone's eye and what won't.
post #97 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post



Unless you are being interviewed for a very high level position in which your professional judgement and advise is what you are being interviewed for. In that case you would be expected to wear whatever you deam most appropriate - and it better be good.

When being interviewed for entry level to middle management the expectation is that you should be a person who is willing to do as you are told to do on the job. And if you show up breaking the most obvious of rules you are sending absolutely the wrong message. Why take that risk?

I've interviewed quite a few job candidates over the years and you should realize that the person doing the interview has very little time to actually evaluate you - you are most likely one of ten people being interviewed for a position. Because of that lack of time many people use some 'shorthand' evaluation techniques. I have a three strikes, your out policy: 1.) Typos or grammer errors in resume or cover letter, 2.) Badly groomed fingernails, 3.) Shoes any color but black. Is it fair? Probably not really, but it certainly shows a generally 'lax' attention to detail and I gotta make decisions fairly quickly.

I do like the first 2 paragraphs as reasonably on the money and at the least thought provoking, but "shoes any colour but black" is absolutely ROTFLMAO material. Unless 3 strikes means all 3, in which case you are far too generous, as the inability to properly proofread and spell check even for a gen Y should be cause for the circular filing cabinet - dirty shoes, untucked shirts, unbuttoned top buttons, dirty ties, halitosis, and perhaps stupid hairdoos all rate way in front of colour.

It is one thing to judge because you dont know any better when your prejudices rule only your subconscious, but to apply your thinking mind to the problem and still be prejudiced despite your experience, is to recklessly ignore your own best interests imo.
post #98 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by pharmaboy View Post


I do like the first 2 paragraphs as reasonably on the money and at the least thought provoking, but "shoes any colour but black" is absolutely ROTFLMAO material. Unless 3 strikes means all 3, in which case you are far too generous, as the inability to properly proofread and spell check even for a gen Y should be cause for the circular filing cabinet - dirty shoes, untucked shirts, unbuttoned top buttons, dirty ties, halitosis, and perhaps stupid hairdoos all rate way in front of colour.

Yes - I meant all three strikes would be insurmountable for even a candidate with a KILLER portfolio.

I work in a creative industry - we can forgive a lot of technical issues in trade off for the right talent.

But do bear in mind that even one of the strikes (among many others) is going to count against you all other things being equal.

I've never had a candidate with dirty shoes, untucked shirts, no tie, dirty tie nor noticible halitosis. Hairstyle - well in the creative industry you just have to accept some variety.

Again - the point of all of these rules is to see if you are hiring someone who will be cooperative - not a total renegade.
post #99 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post


Yes, whether or not you like them.

Unless you are being interviewed for a very high level position in which your professional judgement and advise is what you are being interviewed for. In that case you would be expected to wear whatever you deam most appropriate - and it better be good.

When being interviewed for entry level to middle management the expectation is that you should be a person who is willing to do as you are told to do on the job. And if you show up breaking the most obvious of rules you are sending absolutely the wrong message. Why take that risk?

I've interviewed quite a few job candidates over the years and you should realize that the person doing the interview has very little time to actually evaluate you - you are most likely one of ten people being interviewed for a position. Because of that lack of time many people use some 'shorthand' evaluation techniques. I have a three strikes, your out policy: 1.) Typos or grammer errors in resume or cover letter, 2.) Badly groomed fingernails, 3.) Shoes any color but black. Is it fair? Probably not really, but it certainly shows a generally 'lax' attention to detail and I gotta make decisions fairly quickly.
laugh.gif (no offence Gdot)
post #100 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pliny View Post

laugh.gif (no offence Gdot)

rotflmao.gif

No offence taken Pliny. shog[1].gif

I'm sure my online posts are filled with both typos and grammar errors. I'll make no claims to the contrary.

There's no spell check and no secretary to clean up behind me and in real life I'm a pretty 'loose' speller. When in college I used to say 'spelling rules are only for the uncreative mind' however I've since learned that not to be quite true in the real world.

Given that the spelling norms here include words such as poast, shooz, etc. etc. I trust you will find a way to forgive me! fistbump.gif
post #101 of 103
I can't be down with monks as the default black shoe, especially for interviews and such. Too great a chance they'll be seen as foppish or effete.

For black casual footwear, I like a chelsea. That can go most places ... but I still wouldn't wear it to a funeral.

Sometimes there's no replacement for the black bal.
post #102 of 103
I think this statement will best sum up my thoughts on this whole thread: Black captoes are like a navy suit, or a charcoal tweed SC, or a light blue broadcloth shirt. Very safe, and no one will fault you for wearing them.
post #103 of 103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post


rotflmao.gif

No offence taken Pliny. shog[1].gif

I'm sure my online posts are filled with both typos and grammar errors. I'll make no claims to the contrary.

There's no spell check and no secretary to clean up behind me and in real life I'm a pretty 'loose' speller. When in college I used to say 'spelling rules are only for the uncreative mind' however I've since learned that not to be quite true in the real world.

Given that the spelling norms here include words such as poast, shooz, etc. etc. I trust you will find a way to forgive me! fistbump.gif
icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post

I can't be down with monks as the default black shoe, especially for interviews and such. Too great a chance they'll be seen as foppish or effete.

For black casual footwear, I like a chelsea. That can go most places ... but I still wouldn't wear it to a funeral.

Sometimes there's no replacement for the black bal.

yes the monk, perhaps, not derby tho
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