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St. Crispin's Appreciation Thread - Page 122

post #1816 of 2759
pB - are you referring to the width or the thickness of the outsole (you used both terms). There certainly are a number of different thicknesses available for a leather outsole. I know for my chukkas I specified a sole slightly thicker than the notional standard, and was able to select thickness by increasing increments, e.g. 6mm, 8mm, 10mm etc. (I don't recall the exact increments, but it was along those lines).

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post #1817 of 2759
I was referring to thickness.
post #1818 of 2759
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post

Cru5972 today


Beautiful colors....

post #1819 of 2759
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post

Cru5972 today


Evil!
post #1820 of 2759
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

A new sole job by Saint Crispin.



Close up.  A new sole turns out to be half sole, and its pegged instead of nailed.


I don't like half soles. Wrecks the integrity. A Topy would have solved this problem.
post #1821 of 2759
I would have thought the same thing.

But with an outfit like St. Crispin's not only willing to do it, but recommending this repair-changes my whole perspective. Do you think a half sole is acceptable only when done at the factory by a high end shoemaker, or is this generally a perfectly good way to resole?

Did they explain why they suggested it?
post #1822 of 2759
I've heard that a half sole is better method to replace a sole when the shoe has a pegged waist. Something about the pegs being pulled out through the uppers and insole and redone. I would think that is more of an integrity issue. Again, don't know the specifics, just something I heard.
post #1823 of 2759
In my opinion, as a shoe/bootmaker...for the life of the shoe... a half sole is indeed a better solution when pegs are used to secure the waist. But that isn't always an option. The sliced joint on a half sole will generally be the weakest connection and may come loose before the half sole is worn through. Sometimes that can be a real issue, fraught with real danger, such as in the saddle.

75 years ago...thereabouts...half soles would have been done with press cement and presses...even, esp., in shoe repair shops. This made for a very strong bond. But nowadays everyone relies on neoprene based cements and these can and do come loose. Oxidation, chemicals, UV take their toll.

If the shoe is sewn from the breast of the heels to the breast of the heel, a "3/4" sole --the slice being placed under the breast of the heel--is the better/best solution. For many of the same reasons mentioned above...the unreliability of the splice, for example.

Topy would have been fine but to do it right...to protect the mechanical and functional integrity of the shoe...the Topy needs to be either put on when the shoe is made or immediately upon purchase. As a replacement/cover for a worn outsole...as substitute for a half sole, IOW...it leaves a lot to be desired and introduces factors that are more problematic than beneficial.

On edit...the one thing that is too often overlooked, even by "professional" shops or makers doing after market repairs, is that the splice between the new half sole and the existing waist remnant must be precise--the transition smooth with no lumps or changes in thickness. It is all too easy to inadvertently put a "met bar" (a orthopedic correction) on an otherwise normal shoe through inattention to this transition.

--
Edited by DWFII - 3/16/14 at 11:09am
post #1824 of 2759
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

I don't like half soles. Wrecks the integrity. A Topy would have solved this problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dbhdnhdbh View Post

I would have thought the same thing.

But with an outfit like St. Crispin's not only willing to do it, but recommending this repair-changes my whole perspective. Do you think a half sole is acceptable only when done at the factory by a high end shoemaker, or is this generally a perfectly good way to resole?

Did they explain why they suggested it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

In my opinion, as a shoe/bootmaker...for the life of the shoe... a half sole is indeed a better solution when pegs are used to secure the waist. But that isn't always an option. The sliced joint on a half sole will generally be the weakest connection and may come loose before the half sole is worn through. Sometimes that can be a real issue, fraught with real danger, such as in the saddle.

75 years ago...thereabouts...half soles would have been done with press cement and presses...even, esp., in shoe repair shops. This made for a very strong bond. But nowadays everyone relies on neoprene based cements and these can and do come loose. Oxidation, chemicals, UV take their toll.

If the shoe is sewn from the breast of the heels to the breast of the heel, a "3/4" sole --the slice being placed under the breast of the heel--is the better/best solution. For many of the same reasons mentioned above...the unreliability of the splice, for example.

Topy would have been fine but to do it right...to protect the mechanical and functional integrity of the shoe...the Topy needs to be either put on when the shoe is made or immediately upon purchase. As a replacement/cover for a worn outsole...as substitute for a half sole, IOW...it leaves a lot to be desired and introduces factors that are more problematic than beneficial.

On edit...the one thing that is too often overlooked, even by "professional" shops or makers doing after market repairs, is that the splice between the new half sole and the existing waist remnant must be precise--the transition smooth with no lumps or changes in thickness. It is all too easy to inadvertently put a "met bar" (a orthopedic correction) on an otherwise normal shoe through inattention to this transition.

--



St C's factory installed half topy when new. Not loving it. your thoughts?
post #1825 of 2759
Do not love it, either but I never care for the look of any Topy. Not sure if that is a dumb stance to take given it is the sole but I cannot get it out of my brain that it looks that way even when pressed on the concrete.
post #1826 of 2759
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkDerm View Post


St C's factory installed half topy when new. Not loving it. your thoughts?

One should not confuse utility with aesthetics. No one ever said...in all seriousness...that Topy looks good or makes the shoe look good. To the contrary...satisfied.gif
post #1827 of 2759
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

One should not confuse utility with aesthetics. No one ever said...in all seriousness...that Topy looks good or makes the shoe look good. To the contrary...satisfied.gif
How is that topy useful?
post #1828 of 2759


The Corthay half topied sole.
post #1829 of 2759

These are absolutely beautiful - I've had my eye on them for a few weeks.  Have you received them in person, and are you still happy with them in terms of looks and versatility?

post #1830 of 2759
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkDerm View Post

How is that topy useful?

Anyone who's against rubber sole or topy has not been in tropical weathers; any leather sole will get irreversible water damage under those conditions with water sipped from the sole all the way into insole and upper. None of those storm welt or Norwegian construction will help.
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