or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › Want a career involving investments, which Graduate Degree?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Want a career involving investments, which Graduate Degree? - Page 3

post #31 of 51

Between the three options you are considering, I think an MBA would be the wisest one; an MBA degree will cover Finance, hence keeping open the window for a career in investments, but will also provide you with a broader span of expertise and knowledge through courses in management, business strategy, economics, HR, communication, etc. Employers prefer candidates with MBA degrees because they can fulfill various roles, in various capacities within their organizations. Also, having a diverse skill set will allow you to switch careers or start your own company if you ever feel inclined to do so.

post #32 of 51
If you are fresh out of school and want a career trading oil in Houston, the path is:

Scheduler -> Finance -> Trading (all at an E&P)

From there you can move to a Trafigura.

No post-grad degree needed.
post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennglock View Post

If you're set on Houston as a location, look into trading jobs with the big energy firms.


best advice this thread.  forget about your mba.  an mba from a non target school will be worse for your career.

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadcammer View Post



disagree with the first part.

If you're interested in IB, open an excel spreadsheet, type in some numbers, and then modify those numbers from 8am to about 11pm.

Do this for a week. If you haven't lost your mind, welcome, you can consider an IB analyst job.


and learn all excel hotkeys.  while you are at it, learn how to change the font type/size and formatting in word.

 

bonus tip: remove your f1 key.  it will help you tremendously.

post #34 of 51
there is basically no point in getting an MBA to go into IB if its not a top 10 program, because its just going to be a waste of time...
if you arent in IB already then you dont have any experience - if you want to break through with 0 experience then you need serious academic credentials aka a top 10 program like HBS or Wharton.

you are competing with people with experience (at least an IB internship or two) for an entry level position...
if you are already several years post-grad, you have to ask yourself the question - WHY?
If you get in HBS and start as an associate.. maybe its feasible, but starting as ANALYST I, its no good man

if you do MSF - it better be a top 5 program in the country for an easier ticket...
i have a friend who just graduated from nova's MSF program and cant find a job in IB front officer nor middle office - and nova's program is pretty legit too.
basically, imho - get 750 on GMAT first then come back and talk about it.
post #35 of 51

Actually any professional or postgraduate degree is a good money investment. It depends on the sphere you work in.

post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackobs View Post

Actually any professional or postgraduate degree is a good money investment. It depends on the sphere you work in.


yeah it is a good investment - but if you are a product analyst for say .. GE with little banking experience... you technically have 0 chance of breaking into bulge bracket IB unless you have a serious top 10 MBA or MSF and serious connections to get you through the pile of 100s of other applicants also from top MBA programs...

if you want to climb the ladder and become management in your own field, yeah, a regular MBA degree would elevate you ... thats why a lot of people do university of phoenix - because to become management in their own company, you technically just need ANY MBA degree... that aint gonna work if you want to work for goldman sachs or morgan stanley...

\
post #37 of 51
a bit off topic, but for business analyst in general and those working in finance/IB...did you prep for the job in terms of the programs you were going to use (after reading the job description), or did you just learn by on the job training/experience overtime.

for example, using excel to make spreadsheets and other programs (Minitab?). i have a friend who is working as a financial analyst who speaks heavily on the use of excel for his job. should i just go check out amazon/B&N for some books (any recommendations?) or are a lot of these programs more formally introduced at the job. i would say my skills are intermediate at best from my experience while in school.
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

a bit off topic, but for business analyst in general and those working in finance/IB...did you prep for the job in terms of the programs you were going to use (after reading the job description), or did you just learn by on the job training/experience overtime.

for example, using excel to make spreadsheets and other programs (Minitab?). i have a friend who is working as a financial analyst who speaks heavily on the use of excel for his job. should i just go check out amazon/B&N for some books (any recommendations?) or are a lot of these programs more formally introduced at the job. i would say my skills are intermediate at best from my experience while in school.

you need to be fairly expert at excel to be even successful at corp fin and corp fin is like... childs play working 9-530 with a 1.5 hour lunch break and 15 minute coffee recesses
i still dont think you should attempt it without knowing anything... its a stupid job, you make stupid money and you will crash and burn if you dont like doing stupid shit.
imho people interested in going finance or IB should explain why they want to go into it in the first place
post #39 of 51
excel is not only required for only corp finance right? would still like to know if such applications are used in the general business environment and whether there it be a good idea to buy books to learn 'techniques' or just wait for on the job training. was just seeing if i could get any recommendations on a book for excel i.e. for SAS there is "My Little SAS Book"
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by gettoasty View Post

excel is not only required for only corp finance right? would still like to know if such applications are used in the general business environment and whether there it be a good idea to buy books to learn 'techniques' or just wait for on the job training. was just seeing if i could get any recommendations on a book for excel i.e. for SAS there is "My Little SAS Book"

a little parable :
you know a ferrari is like a tier 1 car, right? its expensive, good looking, fast, fun etc. but you know if you go to the ferrari dealer and ask "how much" then you cant afford it, right?
you know IB is like a tier 1 career, right? it pays the most money straight out of college, it hires some of the hardest working individuals that're willing to toil, the initial requirement for entry is extremely high, you work the a ton of hours, you reap a great reward (especially for say a 22 year old straight out of school, getting a 6 figure or near 6 figure tax statement is pretty fucking awesome)
so if you have to ask what kind of programs are used in corp fin and IB... then you are not fit for it, and probably is too late to prepare for it.

not to be cynical or negative, but nah mean, brah?
thumbs-up.gif
post #41 of 51
thanks for that but you may have me mixed up with the OP. i am merely asking to learn, not so much applying it to a current position though further down my employment it may be useful. i just wanted to see if anyone from the actual field, which we can agree on uses excel extensively, would have recommendations for reading material before i just pick out any random book. i can see there may be a misunderstanding since i did mention in my OP investment/IB, but i am more interested in the general business analyst day-to-day operations and their use of such applications. fyi, investments/IB is no longer my real interest or priority atm. ...
post #42 of 51
I'm in a similar position as the op. Will finish up my undergrad in finance in the spring/summer. I'm contemplating my options and thinking about going the MBA route right out of undergrad but not sure. I chose finance because I'm very interested in the field and as such have been learning about investment strategies and investing on my own for years. However, I haven't done much research into prospective finance related jobs. I primarily chose finance because I a) wanted to finish up and get my undergrad degree, and b) figured I might as well get it in a field I enjoy and will find useful even if I don't pursue that specific career path. But I am considering going for the MBA once I'm done with undergrad.

The thing is, my GPA is around 3.0 which is not so good. Chalk that up to not giving a fuck out of high school and moving across country without dropping classes, so I'm carrying F's which really hurt my GPA. Those were all at JC though and I transferred to a state school this past summer and took 15 units with a 3.5 and am taking 18 units this fall with 21 left for spring/summer.

Where I differ from the OP is that I'm going back to school after having dropped out 6 years ago to focus on my career. I have 5 years work experience. Not in the finance sector but in engineering/planning. I spent 5 years as an associate at a traffic engineering/transportation planning firm. I had a six figure income and wrote hundreds of traffic impact analyses for proposed projects that were approved by the city/county/state and are public documents. I've worked with hundreds of clients and governmental agencies from small city engineering and planning departments to the California Dept of Transportation and Office of the Governor. I've represented clients as a consultant at city council/planning commission/community outreach meetings, etc.

So I think my work experience is pretty good and unique, but not sure how that stacks up when considering getting admitted to a good MBA program.

My plan right now is to finally finish my undergrad asap which is why I'm taking the max units allowed per semester that my school allows. It's Cal State Fullerton so it's not a top business school, but it's still the 4th largest b-school in the nation and decent for a state school. I figured that I'll start figuring out my next move next semester as graduation gets closer, but it can't hurt to get advice.

I'm wondering what you guys think my chances are at getting into a good MBA program (I'm thinking I'd only move for a top 3 and might as well apply for the hell of it or get a job and attend USC/UCLA if I can get in). What advice you'd give me for what I should be doing now. Whether you think it'd even be worth it for me to go after that MBA. Any career paths I may want to look into pursuing given my prior work experience.

Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by BDC2823 View Post

I'm in a similar position as the op. Will finish up my undergrad in finance in the spring/summer. I'm contemplating my options and thinking about going the MBA route right out of undergrad but not sure. I chose finance because I'm very interested in the field and as such have been learning about investment strategies and investing on my own for years. However, I haven't done much research into prospective finance related jobs. I primarily chose finance because I a) wanted to finish up and get my undergrad degree, and b) figured I might as well get it in a field I enjoy and will find useful even if I don't pursue that specific career path. But I am considering going for the MBA once I'm done with undergrad.

The thing is, my GPA is around 3.0 which is not so good. Chalk that up to not giving a fuck out of high school and moving across country without dropping classes, so I'm carrying F's which really hurt my GPA. Those were all at JC though and I transferred to a state school this past summer and took 15 units with a 3.5 and am taking 18 units this fall with 21 left for spring/summer.

Where I differ from the OP is that I'm going back to school after having dropped out 6 years ago to focus on my career. I have 5 years work experience. Not in the finance sector but in engineering/planning. I spent 5 years as an associate at a traffic engineering/transportation planning firm. I had a six figure income and wrote hundreds of traffic impact analyses for proposed projects that were approved by the city/county/state and are public documents. I've worked with hundreds of clients and governmental agencies from small city engineering and planning departments to the California Dept of Transportation and Office of the Governor. I've represented clients as a consultant at city council/planning commission/community outreach meetings, etc.

So I think my work experience is pretty good and unique, but not sure how that stacks up when considering getting admitted to a good MBA program.

My plan right now is to finally finish my undergrad asap which is why I'm taking the max units allowed per semester that my school allows. It's Cal State Fullerton so it's not a top business school, but it's still the 4th largest b-school in the nation and decent for a state school. I figured that I'll start figuring out my next move next semester as graduation gets closer, but it can't hurt to get advice.

I'm wondering what you guys think my chances are at getting into a good MBA program (I'm thinking I'd only move for a top 3 and might as well apply for the hell of it or get a job and attend USC/UCLA if I can get in). What advice you'd give me for what I should be doing now. Whether you think it'd even be worth it for me to go after that MBA. Any career paths I may want to look into pursuing given my prior work experience.

Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.

unless your parents make a $1M+ donation to the school and have a building named after you... its slim to none ?
now, you are saying you are around 3.0GPA... you will be competing with kids with 2-3 years of real experience from real companies (GS, MSFT, GOOG etc) on top of their summer internships AND with close to 4.0 GPAs from better undergrad programs (Harvard, MIT, Yale, Stanford etc)...
you might think you are more hungry than the silver spooned prep school punks, talking is cheap, so if you got F's and D's like freshman and sophomore year and then turned around made deans list every semester for junior and senior year ... that might be fine, because it shows maturity and you are capable of achieving. But what prevents them to throw your shit out of the window before they even read your cover letter explaining your sorry ass situation because your GPA is low?
And on top of that... those rich kids from ivy level schools probably have better connections than you, their parents most likely are/know high management and would vouch their kids technically a free ride into the company - while poor fools get sucked into the placebo interviews because the company has to conduct interviews to conform with government hiring regulations
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by BDC2823 View Post

Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.

You could always pursue your CFA instead of the MBA and not worry about admissions.
post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwright11 View Post

I'm not really sure what career I want to pursue at this point, but I would really like to do something involving investments as the title says. I am currently a Finance undergrad, set to graduate this coming May.

I want to get a graduate degree but I cannot decide which one will suit me best. The three main ones I am looking at are a masters in Economics or Finance, or an MBA.

Any thoughts/experiences would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks

Do the one that is the most rigourous quantitatively. That isn't the MBA, which really is a generalist degree, though some schools try to fancy it up with some mathematics requirements. Your one and only choice will be econometrics, naturally.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Business, Careers & Education
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › Want a career involving investments, which Graduate Degree?