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Rain and Trench Coat Style - Page 3

post #31 of 45
It took me ages to find a decent slimmer trench at a good price. I finally found the Lands End Canvas trench on sale for $80. I need to get the sleeves shortened but otherwise I've been very happy.
post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achilles_ View Post


That's what I want it for. When we have heavy rain I wear my trench coat and still get funny looks facepalm.gif (stupid mid-west frown.gif )

But when it's sprinkling I want a lighter/smaller duty coat that won't look ridiculous.

A dark mac gets much less attention, and can still be found in long enough lengths to keep serious rain off. I wear my black mac (covered buttons and all, which I'm fine with) much more often then my tan trench.
post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post


A dark mac gets much less attention, and can still be found in long enough lengths to keep serious rain off. I wear my black mac (covered buttons and all, which I'm fine with) much more often then my tan trench.

My trench is navy, so I was hoping it wouldn't stand out as much tounge.gif

Edit: Lands End has some nice double breasted, but I'm not a big fan of DB...
post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicola View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

I don't really understand the point of short raincoats. They don't keep you dry (you're better off with a brolly if it's wet but still too warm to wear a full-length raincoat/trenchcoat), and aesthetically don't add much more than a regular jacket would. Is the appeal about having a layering option, perhaps?




It's so girls in short skirts can show some leg. On guys? Hell if I know.

OTOH I don't really consider them rain coats. More like light weight outerwear. Just a different look then other jackets.


lol'ed at the girls comment.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post

I like a shorter length for the light rain/heavy fog/mist we get here.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by philosophe View Post

They're good in places with minimal rain. Once there's real rain, short coats are just ineffective.


Yes, OK, this does make sense. I suppose I just tend to carry a brolly around if it looks like there's going to be light occasional drizzle (which, admittedly, is more days than I'd care to admit in England! :) ). But if you're not a brolly-in-drizzle person, then I can see the appeal of a light/short raincoat instead of a heavy full-blown trench.

 

Thanks for explaining it to me!

post #35 of 45
I'm curious as to what you think about this http://shop.uniqlo.com/uk/goods/065117 biggrin.gif
post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by togglebutton View Post

I'm curious as to what you think about this http://shop.uniqlo.com/uk/goods/065117 biggrin.gif



I would burn it stirpot.gif
post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by togglebutton View Post

I'm curious as to what you think about this http://shop.uniqlo.com/uk/goods/065117 biggrin.gif

I wish they shipped to the US frown.gif

Anything similarly cheap here in the US?
post #38 of 45
Isn't there still a Uniqlo in NYC? Perhaps they have it there...
post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

I don't really understand the point of short raincoats. They don't keep you dry (you're better off with a brolly if it's wet but still too warm to wear a full-length raincoat/trenchcoat), and aesthetically don't add much more than a regular jacket would. Is the appeal about having a layering option, perhaps?


I have one mid-length rain coat and one full-length one. While the full-length one definitely provides more protection from the elements, it starts getting uncomfortable on days I am getting in and out of the car frequently as is required for my job and driving between work sites. On those days, I stick to the mid-length one. Plus, this is just my opinion, but the mid-length rain coat also seems a bit more versatile because it seems to work better with my casual clothes than my longer one does.
post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

I don't really understand the point of short raincoats. They don't keep you dry...

And the more efficiently waterproof a short raincoat is, the wetter the trousers become from rain run-off.

What some others have written leads me to suggest a knee-length single-breasted raincoat (the raglan-sleeved fly-fronted style called "balmacaan" by Americans) for light rain, with a true (longer) trenchcoat for serious rain, the latter to have a winter lining if that is required. Surely practicality has priority over style?
post #41 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by williamson View Post

And the more efficiently waterproof a short raincoat is, the wetter the trousers become from rain run-off.

What some others have written leads me to suggest a knee-length single-breasted raincoat (the raglan-sleeved fly-fronted style called "balmacaan" by Americans) for light rain, with a true (longer) trenchcoat for serious rain, the latter to have a winter lining if that is required. Surely practicality has priority over style?

Interesting, in theory it makes sense. But where I live I rarely see a trench coat unless it is absolutely pouring rain outside. Even then it is rare. So that I do not look a fool (albeit a dry one) I would use a 3/4 length rain coat.
post #42 of 45

6035764498_8c9276f22e_z.jpg

post #43 of 45
I love my Mackage Wade trench I bought last spring. Very modern, so I'm not sure it's everyone's cup of tea here, but I love it. smile.gif

You can still get it at Mackage's site and it's on sale.

500
post #44 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achilles_ View Post

Interesting, in theory it makes sense. But where I live I rarely see a trench coat unless it is absolutely pouring rain outside. Even then it is rare. So that I do not look a fool (albeit a dry one) I would use a 3/4 length rain coat.
I see your point - we all have to adapt our clothes to our climatic environment. Where I live, the annual rainfall is well over 1 metre (40") and it rains, on average, on 200 days per year, with March-April-May as the (relatively) drier and October-November-December as the (relatively) wetter seasons. So, for someone in the west of Britain (and even more so in Ireland) more than one raincoat is by no means a luxury
Edited by williamson - 8/19/11 at 8:59am
post #45 of 45
I was hoping to get a cheap rain coat from uniqlo when I'm in the Uk this summer, but it appears they don't carry a navy single breasted model anymore, neither does the US.

Any other options for an affordable, 3/4 length cotton trench coat? (it might be called a mac coat, I don't know the terminology exactly)

I'm scouring ebay for a aquascutum or burberry to no avail.
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