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Solid (non-navy) Sport Coats - Page 3

post #31 of 51
What is the general consensus on this pattern? It's a brown birds-eye pattern. Too boring for a SC?

isaia-1.jpg
post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post

Thanks Manton. I would probably burn up in the Harris. Any advice on who makes a good shetland?

 

 

The Chan stuff did arrive last night. The tweed jacket is made of a W Bill tweed a lot like the one you've shown, but I think it was 14 oz. It's a mid brown herringbone w/ orange, green, burgundy and white flecks. Super soft. Significantly softer than the breanish, yet hardier. I'm guessing it's made of lambswool. If you want to make joint appts w/ Chan on Friday, I'll bring it.

On a side note, I'm not quite as happy w/ the light gray Crispaire suit. Not nearly as nice as the finmeresco. Wrinkles easier.

Btw, are you still happy w/ the Zegna cash/co corduroy on your sportcoat? I'd like a solid green corduroy. I know they have H&S all cotton, but I'm not sure what else, if anything. Despos once recommended cotton/wool blends but also said they're very rare nowadays.

If anyone has any recommendations, I'd appreciate them very much.
post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I would be careful with Harris, guys. It's really thick and warm. Nice stuff but somewhat impractical unless you live somewhere really cold and/or spend a lot time out of doors. Shetland is more versatile.

Ditto, love the texture of the Harris tweed but it's way too warm for me. Lovat Mill makes some very decent shetland, they are friendly to deal with as well.
post #34 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

Anyway, I'm curious as to whether there is a divergence between navy and non-navy odd jacket feeling?
I think all odd jackets/sport coats are better with texture. The couple navy "blazers" I have are open hopsack weaves (and not truly blazers since they don't have metal buttons).
I don't know why there's such a ubiquity of plain twill weave navy blazers. I don't think the cloth is any less expensive to produce. Maybe it's a self perpetuating cycle, where the more retailers sell, the more manufacturers order cloth, and the more cloth gets made and the economies of scale are reinforced.
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

Btw, are you still happy w/ the Zegna cash/co corduroy on your sportcoat? I'd like a solid green corduroy.
Yes, it's sort of my default jacket for casual-drinks-out-at-a-Mission-dive-bar which for me is more often than fancy-drinks-downtown. It's even better now that it's worn in. The dark green or olive would make a great casual coat imo.
post #35 of 51
I'm having one made in a dark green/bronze birdseye pattern by Mahon at English Cut at the moment. No pictures yet as I don't have the jacket. Just ordered it this past spring. Also have one in navy with a subtle burgundy windowpane. Contrary to the general consensus here, mine are made in worsted fabrics. Anything else I find just too warm for me, even in San Francisco.
post #36 of 51
I want my next sportcoat to be a solid dark green like this shade. I'd wear it with a midnight navy wool tie and light brown trousers that had a lower level of color saturation.



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post #37 of 51
^^You can find green or olive herringbone or donegal cloth and have it made up. Green will indeed go well with shades of brown.
post #38 of 51
In ancient days, when I was in College, a very famous British Professor
came to give a lecture on British Politics. He was wearing a deep burgundy blazer.
I forgot his name and the subject but ,I remember the jacket.
post #39 of 51
I have a Lacoste green blazer (no golfo) that I thrifted. The color is a faded kelly green in an open weave hopsack. I like it, though it currently has bright brass buttons (with aligators!), which I think pushes it over into a costume. When I get around to changing the buttons to light brown horn or MOP, I think the jacket will get a lot of use.
post #40 of 51
As far as Shetlands go, I see no need to look any further than W. Bill and Breanish.
post #41 of 51
I was thinking of ordering a grey herringbone sports coat for the autumn, but I'm not yet sure what fabric I'd use. I'd like it to be "clean" enough to wear to the office, but it would have patch pockets and swelled edges. I was looking at this Lesser 13oz worsted:

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Would I be able to use this without it looking like a suit orphan? Or should I rather opt for a light tweed?
post #42 of 51
^^ That's a suit.
post #43 of 51
Thread Starter 

Yeah, the photos on the Harrisons/Lesser site are magnified, so it's hard to tell the scale. The Glenroyal book has a few herringbones. I think that could work for a sport coat and, of course the Harris tweeds.

post #44 of 51
I have a few navys and greys. And a burgundy velvet. I need to get some earth tones.
post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post

Yeah, the photos on the Harrisons/Lesser site are magnified, so it's hard to tell the scale. The Glenroyal book has a few herringbones. I think that could work for a sport coat and, of course the Harris tweeds.


Thanks for the advice. One more question: I was also considering a grey donegal for a sports coat, and was looking at the fabrics in the P&H Glorious Twelfth and Thornproof books. I have some swatches, but these say very little about how they wear respectively. How would you compare them?
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