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Grizzly/Polar Bear vs Tiger? - Page 2

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai View Post


Isn't a liger stronger than either of its parent species?

And what of the Tigon? Who would win between Liger and Tigon, or bear, Polar or Grizzly.
post #17 of 27
Ligers and Tigons are both seriously messed-up animals genetically. Ligers never stop growing, Tigons are prone to dwarfism, although the one Tigon I saw was an imposing beast. She had had a cub by an Amur Tiger. (Female Tigons and Ligers are fertile, males are sterile.) He weighed 700 pounds when I saw him. Sadly both animals died soon after I saw them, at extremely young ages for big cats. Both types of hybrids are much less healthy than the parent species.
post #18 of 27
don't forget grolar bears and narlugas... dang that sucks that we were the cause of these animals...
post #19 of 27
Apparently "grolar" or "pizzly" bears have occurred intermittently long before humans had any appreciable environmental impact. A mysterious bear was shot in northern Canada in the mid-19th century that may have been a "grolar" (or "pizzly"). Unlike the Ligers and Tigons, I am not sure that these bears' interbreeding produces less functional animals. It may be more akin to humans of different races interbreeding.

Don't know anything about "narlugas" although the derivation is obvious.
post #20 of 27
I can just see the next "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" Cartoon on Disney!
post #21 of 27
In anticipation of "Shark Week" I was watching a doc on sharks where they were frequently referred to as the oceans apex predator. I worked on whale watching boats in the northwest years ago and have seen too many orcas in action to not call bullshit on that claim. So I looked it up and sure enough, footage of a killer whale nonchalantly biting a great white in half. I think this was around Angel Island, one of the videos said that great whites congregate there en masse every year to feed on the seals for an extended period of time. Killer whale bites one shark in half to death and they are steer clear for the rest of the season. I wonder how many sharks went hungry that year, out of fear, as it is one of their regular feeding grounds and likely highly depended on.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8GaDuCvYbE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvTmrieZXBY&feature=related

Never learned to embed and I don't plan to.
Favorite quote" Damn Nature You Scary!"
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by hossoso View Post

In anticipation of "Shark Week" I was watching a doc on sharks where they were frequently referred to as the oceans apex predator. I worked on whale watching boats in the northwest years ago and have seen too many orcas in action to not call bullshit on that claim. So I looked it up and sure enough, footage of a killer whale nonchalantly biting a great white in half. I think this was around Angel Island, one of the videos said that great whites congregate there en masse every year to feed on the seals for an extended period of time. Killer whale bites one shark in half to death and they are steer clear for the rest of the season. I wonder how many sharks went hungry that year, out of fear, as it is one of their regular feeding grounds and likely highly depended on.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8GaDuCvYbE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvTmrieZXBY&feature=related

Never learned to embed and I don't plan to.
Favorite quote" Damn Nature You Scary!"

I just watched one of those nature shows and they showed a video clip of a trio of orcas hunting a seal. The seal took refuge on a small piece of ice (maybe 20 feet in diameter) which you'd think would allow it to wait out the orcas and live happily ever after. But the orcas teamed up and swam at the ice at a high rate of speed, dipping under the ice right before the got to it; this caused a wave to crash over the ice, pushing the seal closer to the edge. They did this a number of times until they finally managed to knock the seal off the ice. Needless to say, the seal did not live long.
post #23 of 27
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post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

Apparently "grolar" or "pizzly" bears have occurred intermittently long before humans had any appreciable environmental impact. A mysterious bear was shot in northern Canada in the mid-19th century that may have been a "grolar" (or "pizzly"). Unlike the Ligers and Tigons, I am not sure that these bears' interbreeding produces less functional animals. It may be more akin to humans of different races interbreeding.

Don't know anything about "narlugas" although the derivation is obvious.

They won't win with a name like that unless the other animal is deaf or has no sense of humour.
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai View Post


Isn't a liger stronger than either of its parent species?

I know they are larger, so that wouldn't surprise me.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

Ligers and Tigons are both seriously messed-up animals genetically. Ligers never stop growing, Tigons are prone to dwarfism, although the one Tigon I saw was an imposing beast. She had had a cub by an Amur Tiger. (Female Tigons and Ligers are fertile, males are sterile.) He weighed 700 pounds when I saw him. Sadly both animals died soon after I saw them, at extremely young ages for big cats. Both types of hybrids are much less healthy than the parent species.

That's pretty interesting. IIRC there's a certain gene passed on from the female lion that the female tiger lacks, which is the cause of the larger size (thus not present in tigons). From a skeletal and joint perspective, I would think there would be issues caused by continued growth throughout the lifespan. Are you aware of any other mammal that shares this trait (never stops growing)?
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcg View Post

That's pretty interesting. IIRC there's a certain gene passed on from the female lion that the female tiger lacks, which is the cause of the larger size (thus not present in tigons). From a skeletal and joint perspective, I would think there would be issues caused by continued growth throughout the lifespan. Are you aware of any other mammal that shares this trait (never stops growing)?

Sylvester Stallone.
post #27 of 27
The polar bear will take on male walruses, which is astounding.

In the bear vs tiger battle, it would probably fall within some range, like 65 / 35 percent one way or the other. I believe bears have an advantage because their front legs and paws are so powerful. The tiger, however, may be able to use this to his advantage, because tigers attack by clamping down on the throat. If the bear were to miss, the tiger may have access to the bear's trachea.
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