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post #16 of 19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post
It has to be an ideal situation - where air is cut off and aerobic bacteria do not compete with the anaerobic bacteria so the botulism can then divide. Some bacteria are "obligate anaerobes", which means they must have an oxygen-free environment to survive, but I'm not sure if botulism is one of those.

The botulism bacteria and/or spores (all you need are spores to start the colonization) are on and within the garlic, but the bacteria themselves are not in any sufficient quantity to be dangerous. Furthermore, your highly acidic stomach will kill any bacteria but not denature the toxin if it is already produced.
Please post more. This is good shit.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Please post more. This is good shit.

+100

and in case it wasn't clear, this is just about garlic stored in oil, not about garlic cooked in a dish that contains oil.
post #18 of 19
Unfortunately, botulism must produce toxin in water or else canned goods wouldn't be at risk. I think you mean water exposed to air, where oxygen equilibrates between the two mediums
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackToothedGrin View Post
Unfortunately, botulism must produce toxin in water or else canned goods wouldn't be at risk. I think you mean water exposed to air, where oxygen equilibrates between the two mediums

Or fortunately - however you want to look at it. But if that's true then fresh garlic does have water in it. I'm not sure I know what you mean with the "water exposed to air, where oxygen equlilibrates between the two mediums".

This brings up a question that I have which I assumed to be true: is the toxin fat soluble?
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