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Pics of my Burlington anomaly plus related interview questions

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone. I recently posted in another topic about a suit I bought at Burlington for $185. I'm no expert but it seems to be far better quality than even the more expensive ($359) suits they had from the same brand (Giorgio Andreani). I bought this suit to use in law firm interviews and was wondering if I could get some opinions from lawyers and other members on whether I made the right choice of suit, what brand/color/style tie I should wear along with it and whether my shoes (pic below) are proper for such a situation. I'm not trying to say that this is a $1000+ suit but I feel that I did well for the money. Thanks for your input.
post #2 of 24
Cerruti is a fabric mill which under Nino Cerruti was turned into a label rather like E.Zegna during the '60s. The premier line is called Cerruti 1881. However, I suspect this suit--like those Zegnas advertised on eBay--only uses Cerruti fabric.
post #3 of 24
Take my comments as constructive criticism. The suit looks serviceable, but a little tacky with the machine pickstitching all over the place. It looks pretty typical of the obscure-Italian-brand suits I've seen at various discounters. Keep in mind that most people you run into probably won't notice the pickstitching or care, but for an interview you want to avoid anything like that if possible and go for the most conservative, plain, boring suit possible.

I am really starting to wonder if this is the name of the suits I saw in Tokyo last year with a vaguely Italian name and similar stitching all over. They seemed to be pretty good quality and retailed for about $400 or so.

As for the shoes, you don't want to wear those to an interview. You want a pair of plain black captoe oxfords.

Overall I'm sure you can get plenty of use out of both, but I don't think they are as versatile as you would want for your first suit and shoes.
post #4 of 24
I am a practising attorney and participate in the office's hiring process. I generally agree with J. I think the shoes are the bigger problem and would certainly recommend a far more conservative choice, such a captoes. However, if you only had black wing-tips, it would be fine. As to the suit, aside from the pick stitching, I would note that this suits appears to be a true 3 button with a somewhat high button stance. This will look a bit fashion forward to some older partner types who tend to dress very, very trad.
post #5 of 24
This type of suit is very prevelant at the discounters. They usually either have the first or last name of the brand be the same as a more popular brand. The excessive pickstitching is showing up more in these suits as is a disturbing 5 working buttonholes on the sleeve trend. If you have no other suit to wear, this will suffice but I would suggest a trip to a Men's Warehouse where for under $200 you will probably find something that is more of a true interview suit. Also, Marshall's have a ton of Arnold Brant suits sellling for about $175 and they are better quality than what you have and they are also good first interview suits.
post #6 of 24
Men's Wearhouse?
post #7 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
Men's Wearhouse?

Well, the OP went to Burlington and purchased a $185 suit so I am assuming that this is his price range. I am also assuming that he prefers to purchase new and in person and not go the ebay route or purchase used. Aren't too many places to get a new $185 suit. Even a Banana Republic suit is more than that. But if you know of a place.................
post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 
I had a suit custom made in Hong Kong this past summer which cost more than this one but will certainly not suffice for interviews - it is mainly for Sabbath use and special events thanks to its pinstripes. Unfortunately, I had it made before I started law school and I did not realize the importance of an interview ready solid color suit. On the bright side, the pickstitching is not nearly as apparent under normal lighting as it is in the close up pictures. Is it generally possible to have it removed without disfiguring the garment? Oh well. Back to the drawing board. Also, $185 is less than I usually pay for a suit. What do you recommend in the sub $500 range? I am on Long Island. Thanks
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnGeLiCbOrIs

Also, $185 is less than I usually pay for a suit. What do you recommend in the sub $500 range? I am on Long Island.

Thanks

Filene's basement and Century 21. Also, for a traditional interview suit, you could go to Syms. Finally, if conservative enough, a ps suit is not inappropriate.
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnGeLiCbOrIs
I had a suit custom made in Hong Kong this past summer which cost more than this one but will certainly not suffice for interviews - it is mainly for Sabbath use and special events thanks to its pinstripes. Unfortunately, I had it made before I started law school and I did not realize the importance of an interview ready solid color suit.


What kind of pinstripe is it? I would think a typical pinstripe is far more suited to business wear than a social/religious/special event. And most pinstripes that are not conservative enough for business wear might seem equally out of place at a traditional religious event.
post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel
is a disturbing 5 working buttonholes on the sleeve trend. If you have no other suit to wear, this will suffice .


As usual, I agree fully with Ed. I'm wondering now. Does your $189 Burlington suit have 5 working buttonholes? That is kind of tacky!

BTW: To the OP. You obviously do have another suit, as you've posted. I think your pinstriped suit looks fine for an interview. But I'm not an Attorney, and certainly don't know the culture of the office you will be interviewing at. But with cap toe shoes and a nice conservative shirt and tie, I think the pinstripe would be fine!

What do some of you practicing Attorneys think about the pinstripe?

Good Luck on your interview. Remember how important first impressions are (Re: clothes), and you should look the part. But what you say will be equally important. I hope you nail the interview. And welcome and keep coming to SF. There sure seem to be many active Attorney members of SF, and many of them seem to do very well indeed. Oxxford, Brioni, Lobbs, Edward Green, etc. are't cheap
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh
As usual, I agree fully with Ed. I'm wondering now. Does your $189 Burlington suit have 5 working buttonholes? That is kind of tacky!

BTW: To the OP. You obviously do have another suit, as you've posted. I think your pinstriped suit looks fine for an interview. But I'm not an Attorney, and certainly don't know the culture of the office you will be interviewing at. But with cap toe shoes and a nice conservative shirt and tie, I think the pinstripe would be fine!

What do some of you practicing Attorneys think about the pinstripe?

Good Luck on your interview. Remember how important first impressions are (Re: clothes), and you should look the part. But what you say will be equally important. I hope you nail the interview. And welcome and keep coming to SF. There sure seem to be many active Attorney members of SF, and many of them seem to do very well indeed. Oxxford, Brioni, Lobbs, Edward Green, etc. are't cheap


Two things:

1. The pinstriping seems fine. Cannot comment on anything other than the slive of fabric shown. If the suit is conservative in cut, it would would for an interview.
2. Not all of us attorneys do "very well indeed." However, because of sample sales, ebay, thrifting, etc. we are able to partake in the Oxxford-level of dress from time-to-time.
post #14 of 24
I bought a vintage trench off eBay from the Nino Cerruti 1881 label. It is cut incredibly well and fits amazingly but the construction methods and materials used are horrible! Cheap plastic buckles and cheap plastic buttons, it is too embarassing to wear. I took them to the local tailor to ask if he could replace them, he said he could not replace them cost effectively (they would have to be sought out and ordered from God-knows-where), he agreed the fit of the trench was good but scolded me for buying something so shoddily made. I hope you have better luck with your NC 1881 garment.
post #15 of 24
Why are the shoulder seams pick-stitched? Wouldn't one want the excess fabric laid flat to either side of the seam, rather pick-stitched against the back side, thus creating a ridge where none need be?

On this general subject, I noted last night at the David Chu sale that nearly all his suits have spalla-camicia-type pick-stitching above the armscye. It worked on some models more than others, but it seemed dubious to me as a "signature."
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