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How do you care for your shirts? - Page 3

post #31 of 50
Bleachboy asks for the "one true way" to get rid of stains from collars. Unfortunately, I can't point to any one "miracle product". The best I can do is to provide you with some information about the different "stains" you'll find in your collars. This way you can tailor your treatments to each different type of "stain". So here goes..... The problem generally boils down to this: collars and cuffs typically exhibit 3 types of stains -- water-based stains (such as perspiration, coffee, juice, beer, wine, etc.), oil-based stains (such as body oil, lotion, creams, salad dressing, etc.) and dirt/soil. And you have to individually treat each category of stain. Water/detergent/safe bleaches alone will often remove the water-based stains and the dirt/soil, but not the oil-based stains. Only dry cleaning solvents or fluids will emulsify and dissolve the oil-based stains. Here's the problem: if those oil-based stains are not removed, those oil-based stains can oxidize and turn yellow/brown when heat is applied (for example, when the shirt is ironed). At RAVE FabriCARE, we follow a multi-step process. First, the shirts are soaked in siloxane (an extremely gentle, dermatologically friendly, non-dye bleeding dry cleaning fluid....so gentle, in fact, that I can wash my face in it). That emulsifies the oil-based stains. Second, all shirts are soaked in special water-based solutions for at least 10 hours. That lifts the water-based stains, any salts/acids from perspiration and aluminum chlorides from antiperspirants/deodorants. Third, all shirts are gently laundered for a relatively short period of time in cool water with an enzyme detergent. Fourth, all shirts are hand ironed. So the answer to your question is that there is no magic bullet. Rather, it's a multistep process that addresses EACH COMPONENT of the problem. Your assignment now is to find your own solution by applying the "theory" identified above, but using "stuff" that you might find in your laundry room, bathroom or kitchen. For example, a gentle dish washing detergent to emulsify the oil-based stains, a gentle soaking agent that does not include sodium hyperchlorite (the primary ingredient in Clorox bleach) to lift the water-based stains, and a gentle detergent for the wash (machine or hand). As the saying goes, if you don't know where your'e going any road will take you there. Hopefully I've provided the roadmap. Good luck. Website: www.ravefabricare.com Daily blog: www.truequalitycleaning.com
post #32 of 50
I entrust the care of my shirts (and the rest of my clothes) to my wife.
post #33 of 50
You should wash your shirts after every wear. Iron inside-out if the fabric is delicate and develops a sheen from the heat. A good non-white shirt can last 4-5 years if worn 3-4 times per month.
post #34 of 50
I send mine to the cleaners.

Hangers, no starch.


I don't expect my shirts to last forever. When they wear out, I buy more.
post #35 of 50
After one wear, I put them in the laundry bag, place them on the front porch, and every Tuesday and Thursday the guy from the cleaners comes and picks them up. He brings them back on hangers, no starch, and I hang them in my closet. Life is too short and shirts are too inexpensive to spend your time washing and ironing them.
post #36 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarleyBob View Post
Life is too short and shirts are too inexpensive to spend your time washing and ironing them.

Life is too short to buy inexpensive shirts.

I don't trust the cleaners with $400 shirts.
post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kai View Post
I send mine to the cleaners.

Hangers, no starch.


I don't expect my shirts to last forever. When they wear out, I buy more.

This.

I just cannot imagine spending my time at home washing and pressing my shirts when I could be playing golf, drinking Scotch, watching football, spending time with my family, reading, or any number of other activities I'd rather be doing.

Washing and pressing shirts when it costs at most $1.50 to have it done well at my favorite cleaners? No thanks!
post #38 of 50
I have over 50 dress shirts I've accumulated over the years, about 40 of them I wear regularly, a few favorites I wear more frequently. I wear them on rotation. As soon as I receive a batch from the cleaners (hanger, medium starch - yes, I prefer them starched), they go to the far end of the closet. I start the rotation from the other end and work my way in each day. Each shirt basically gets worn once every six - eight weeks or so. That means fewer trips to the cleaners per shirt, and hopefully, longevity. I do own several high-ticket shirts; they go to the cleaners as well. Like others have said, life is to short to spend time cleaning/ironing yourself. I'd rather spend time with family than meticulously cleaning an expensive bespoke piece of clothing. At the end of the day, they're just inanimate, material objects. To each his own; we all decide our priorities.
post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by nerve64 View Post
I have over 50 dress shirts I've accumulated over the years, about 40 of them I wear regularly, a few favorites I wear more frequently. I wear them on rotation. As soon as I receive a batch from the cleaners (hanger, medium starch - yes, I prefer them starched), they go to the far end of the closet. I start the rotation from the other end and work my way in each day. Each shirt basically gets worn once every six - eight weeks or so. That means fewer trips to the cleaners per shirt, and hopefully, longevity. I do own several high-ticket shirts; they go to the cleaners as well. Like others have said, life is to short to spend time cleaning/ironing yourself. I'd rather spend time with family than meticulously cleaning an expensive bespoke piece of clothing. At the end of the day, they're just inanimate, material objects. To each his own; we all decide our priorities.

You don't notice the starch turning your white shirts yellow?
post #40 of 50
The two things that kill shirts the fastest: 1) starch; 2) commercial presses.

I get my shirts hand pressed, which costs $ but greatly extends their lives (and doesn't break or chip any buttons).
post #41 of 50
Great tips...wish I had something interesting to add.
post #42 of 50
back in the days (when my dad wore shirts) my mom would hand washed my dad's shirts. i guess that's too much to ask for these days.
post #43 of 50
holy necro batman
post #44 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by niidawg3 View Post
i wash and iron my shirts myself. and yes - one wear and into the laundry basket.

+1. That is, I put them in the machine myself.
post #45 of 50
I give all mine to the dry cleaners, who launders them normally, I normally go for batches of 10. I tend to get the dreaded 'collar ring', despite the fact the shirt is only worn for a day. Sometimes on the cuff as well if it's a french cuff. They always come back spotless and perfectly hand pressed. He does a much better job than I can do myself. He has some funky stain remover which you can't get from the supermarket. None of the shirts (mix of Truzzi, Borrelli, Barba, Kiton, T & A, H & K and Emma Willis) show any signs of wear, other than a button coming off a Kiton shirt which I bought online. Luckily I caught it in the bud, as Kiton buttons probably cost about £20 each and I think they're made of black truffle As button cuffs are lower maintenance and the Italian brands (which I favour) tend to offer more button cuff shirts, I'm phasing out my double cuff shirts. Any white double cuff shirt seems to become dirty on the cuffs 5 minutes after wearing it.
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