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Riccardo Bestetti Bespoke projects. - Page 63

post #931 of 1172
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


If my 1" heeled last had a lower toe spring, I am near-as-nevermind certain that the resulting shoes would crease more deeply and maybe an additional crease would develop closer to the end of the toe than otherwise.

   pardon me for belaboring this DW but i'm sort of fascinated by the effect. is there an equation that could semi predict

   the location of creasing ?

post #932 of 1172
DWFII, a recent chukka pair I received raised some questions. It has no lining but instead the upper is one very thick piece of calf where the flesh side forms suede and the grain side is smooth leather. Are shoes like this stronger than those that have two thin cuts joined together for upper and lining?
post #933 of 1172
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoGent View Post

   pardon me for belaboring this DW but i'm sort of fascinated by the effect. is there an equation that could semi predict
   the location of creasing ?

None that I know of. There will always be one wide and deep crease that runs from the medial ball joint to the lateral ball joint. And another roughly an inch ahead of that.

Aside from those, other creases that develop can be caused by too low a TS (esp. with extended forepart last--as are in fashion now) and/or improper fitting.
post #934 of 1172
Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

DWFII, a recent chukka pair I received raised some questions. It has no lining but instead the upper is one very thick piece of calf where the flesh side forms suede and the grain side is smooth leather. Are shoes like this stronger than those that have two thin cuts joined together for upper and lining?

Depends on the leather esp. in this day and age. To get that thickness the animal has to be older and/or the maker has to use leather that has a relatively coarse flesh.

And if the flesh is turned to the inside of the shoe...as in many loafer style shoes...the most porous, most dirt accumulating, and roughest leather is against the foot where it is hard to clean or deal with.

If the flesh is turned outward, then the grainside of the leather is against the foot...perhaps marginally more occlusive...and the shoe is, by default, a rough-out/suede which accumulates dirt and moisture from the environment and is generally considered unsuitable for dress wear.

Many old shoes and boots were made of "waxed calf" (hard to find any real, authentic waxed calf still being produced) and gave very good service as work or country foot wear. But full grain, lined, has always been considered the creme de la creme.

Finally, depending on the quality and substance of the leathers chosen for lining and upper, a shoe made from a three ounce veg kip (lining) and a three ounce baby calf (upper) can actually be stronger and more accommodating to the foot than a shoe made from eight to ten ounce cow/calf. And, of course, better looking IMO.

--
Edited by DWFII - 4/25/14 at 7:54am
post #935 of 1172

 

Look what I found on tumblr blog Bestetti ... these are not bad, right? I am a real cool for me ... and then look at that ... they seem to finish the soles of the mirrors. I can not wait to have the same finish under my Gladietor bespoke.

 

Here's the link: http://frecciabestetti.tumblr.com/

 

post #936 of 1172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

DWFII, a recent chukka pair I received raised some questions. It has no lining but instead the upper is one very thick piece of calf where the flesh side forms suede and the grain side is smooth leather. Are shoes like this stronger than those that have two thin cuts joined together for upper and lining?

Depends on the leather esp. in this day and age. To get that thickness the animal has to be older and/or the maker has to use leather that has a relatively coarse flesh.

And if the flesh is turned to the inside of the shoe...as in many loafer style shoes...the most porous, most dirt accumulating, and roughest leather is against the foot where it is hard to clean or deal with.

If the flesh is turned outward, then the grainside of the leather is against the foot...perhaps marginally more occlusive...and the shoe is, by default, a rough-out/suede which accumulates dirt and moisture from the environment and is generally considered unsuitable for dress wear.

Many old shoes and boots were made of "waxed calf" (hard to find any real, authentic waxed calf still being produced) and gave very good service as work or country foot wear. But full grain, lined, has always been considered the creme de la creme.

Finally, depending on the quality and substance of the leathers chosen for lining and upper, a shoe made from a three ounce veg kip (lining) and a three ounce baby calf (upper) can actually be stronger and more accommodating to the foot than a shoe made from eight to ten ounce cow/calf. And, of course, better looking IMO.

--

I really enjoy your explanations. They're clear and logical, so easy to understand. Thanks!


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post #937 of 1172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roy View Post

I really enjoy your explanations. They're clear and logical, so easy to understand. Thanks!


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Yr. Hmb. Svt.

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post #938 of 1172
@DWFII as very helpful and knowledgeable resident expert in this thread could you comment which part of the croc you think was used for the butterfly loafer? It seems to me the tiles look a bit odd... At least not to what I am used to seeing.

Thanks!
post #939 of 1172
Quote:
Originally Posted by C&A View Post

@DWFII as very helpful and knowledgeable resident expert in this thread could you comment which part of the croc you think was used for the butterfly loafer? It seems to me the tiles look a bit odd... At least not to what I am used to seeing.

Thanks!

It's hard to say without looking at the leather in person. It could be just a really large animal, however, my first guess would be tail.
post #940 of 1172
Probably tail, scale too uniform to be one of the belly/leg cut.
post #941 of 1172
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

It's hard to say without looking at the leather in person. It could be just a really large animal, however, my first guess would be tail.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Probably tail, scale too uniform to be one of the belly/leg cut.

If so, would you guys say this is the good part or the bad part of the croc? Or are there no good and bads parts of a croc hide? Or is it just personal preference of the customer which part is used by the maker?
post #942 of 1172
Quote:
Originally Posted by C&A View Post



If so, would you guys say this is the good part or the bad part of the croc? Or are there no good and bads parts of a croc hide? Or is it just personal preference of the customer which part is used by the maker?

The alligator is used throughout. Using the belly which has a scale on the square with rounded corners. The sides and the gorges that have a scale small and round. And the queues that have a very rectangular scale. but the international scale is much wider than the hips and the belly.

 

it is clear that the client chooses what he wants. The size of the scale also depends on the size of the animal. And this butterfly is made ​​with grooves. While the rest is tail. And it's all nubuck, so very special.

post #943 of 1172
Quote:
Originally Posted by C&A View Post


If so, would you guys say this is the good part or the bad part of the croc? Or are there no good and bads parts of a croc hide? Or is it just personal preference of the customer which part is used by the maker?

Is there a "good part?" Or a "bad part?"

The belly is prime.
post #944 of 1172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gianni Cerutti View Post

 

Look what I found on tumblr blog Bestetti ... these are not bad, right? I am a real cool for me ... and then look at that ... they seem to finish the soles of the mirrors. I can not wait to have the same finish under my Gladietor bespoke.

 

Here's the link: http://frecciabestetti.tumblr.com/

 


I like the croc nubuck.


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post #945 of 1172
Agree with you @Roy. Croc nubuck looks real nice. The loafer itself is a bit too much for my taste, but that's personal preference.

When you say prime @DWFII do you mean the leather from the croc's belly looks the nicest , or is the quality of that part of the hide also better / more durable / easier to work with ?
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