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Interior accents--taxidermies and bonsai

post #1 of 77
Thread Starter 
I believe I saw a nice home featured in Vogue L'Uomo that had a number of taxidermies in the rooms. It seemed a nice way to dress up an otherwise draughty structure--the magazine home was a large villa of sorts. Deyrolle in Paris is a well-known taxidermist: The perfect complement to some taxidermies are, of course, very old Bonsai trees(or penjing from the original Chinese):
post #2 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing



Certainly it is curious.

For some reason, the first image reminds me of the earlier (1970-1975) paintings of Donald Roller Wilson. The paintings mocked his wealthy clientele.

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post #3 of 77
That first pic is very creepy. I could just imagine how girls would react if they saw it in my flat.
post #4 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Canvas
Certainly it is curious.

For some reason, the first image reminds me of the earlier (1970-1975) paintings of Donald Roller Wilson. The paintings mocked his wealthy clientele.

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I think Deer Lenore would work well for a Sicilian Baroque house.

I'm a bit familiar with Roller Wilson; and Goya was another who mocked his clients with scathing portrayals:

post #5 of 77
We have a taxidermed armadillo in our bedroom. Good taxidermy is hard to find in the US, and even harder to import. We continue to look.
post #6 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Canvas
Certainly it is curious.

For some reason, the first image reminds me of the earlier (1970-1975) paintings of Donald Roller Wilson. The paintings mocked his wealthy clientele.

___________________________________

He also painted the album cover for Frank Zappa's Them or Us. One look at that would explain how you made the connection.
post #7 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
We have a taxidermed armadillo in our bedroom.


Pic please ;p
post #8 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
That first pic is very creepy. I could just imagine how girls would react if they saw it in my flat.
I think it's the grotesqueness that is attractive about taxidermies. There's a sort of an aesthetic statement not dissimilar to the bonsai which are also crippled by their aesthetic impulse. Another related segment would be the Chinese scholar's rocks which symbolize the lonely and elegant disdain of the ideal Chinese scholar:
post #9 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
We have a taxidermed armadillo in our bedroom. Good taxidermy is hard to find in the US, and even harder to import. We continue to look.
Taxidermies were popular in the 19th century so there are a few antique examples probably still about. Another 19th century item I like are those boxed-in dioramas of Indian temples, etc. which are also rare.
post #10 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
I think it's the grotesqueness that is attractive about taxidermies.

There's a sort of an aesthetic statement not dissimilar to the bonsai which are also crippled by their aesthetic impulse.

Another related segment would be the Chinese scholar's rocks which symbolize the lonely and elegant disdain of the ideal Chinese scholar:


The scholar's rock is very nice. I've checked a couple sites and can't seem to find any prices. How much does something like that go for? Apparently Lingbi stone is quite rare these days...
post #11 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
The scholar's rock is very nice. I've checked a couple sites and can't seem to find any prices. How much does something like that go for? Apparently Lingbi stone is quite rare these days...
Usually a nice quality one in a smaller size will start at about $1500--and of course, the rare, old ones will be quite expensive. They sometimes have them at auctions; I saw one just two weeks ago at the Butterfield's Fine Chinese Art auction preview.
post #12 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
Pic please ;p
I'll try to remember to take one tomorrow.
post #13 of 77


I am surprised to find out how widespread this art has become.

What was once obscure, is now popular.

The internet is a giant Waring blender.

I think the base on this stone is exceptional.

The stone looks like serpentine but I'm guessing.
post #14 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
Pic please ;p
Here you go:
post #15 of 77
On a related subject:
I love the works of Walton Ford as throwbacks to Audubon and diaries of 19th c. travelers and naturalists.
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