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Are Americans the Only Ones into Bad Style? - Page 6

post #76 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitAkira View Post

This is bullshit, buy better shoes


So presumably you are comparing $400 dress shoes to $55 running shoes? I have a few pairs of Allen Edmonds. They may not be the absolute nicest shoes around, and perhaps you have better ones, but I generally like my shoes. I'd still easily prefer my New Balance running shoes if the only thing that matters is comfort. I think if your argument is "my shoes aren't nice enough" you are kind of missing the point and are likely severely detached from the average person.
post #77 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnH123 View Post
And you've still got a closed-minded view about the country?

There are more things about the current state of America as a nation that I dislike rather than like. That's not to say it's the worst country in the world or that there aren't things I like about it (and I certainly like a lot of individuals that are American, although those people tend to be pretty unhappy with America as well). You say I'm close-minded simply because you and I don't share the same viewpoint.
post #78 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by austinite View Post
So presumably you are comparing $400 dress shoes to $55 running shoes? I have a few pairs of Allen Edmonds. They may not be the absolute nicest shoes around, and perhaps you have better ones, but I generally like my shoes. I'd still easily prefer my New Balance running shoes if the only thing that matters is comfort. I think if your argument is "my shoes aren't nice enough" you are kind of missing the point and are likely severely detached from the average person.

The average person (circa 100 IQ) is part of an ignorant demographic conglomerate. They're comparing their "baller" 3 figure sneakers against the cheapest, black, square toed shoes from Payless ShoeSource. Not fair. Once you start buying leather upper and leather soled shoes, (circa $85 and up), shoes suddenly start becoming much more comfortable.
post #79 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amelorn View Post
The average person (circa 100 IQ) is part of an ignorant demographic conglomerate. They're comparing their "baller" 3 figure sneakers against the cheapest, black, square toed shoes from Payless ShoeSource. Not fair. Once you start buying leather upper and leather soled shoes, (circa $85 and up), shoes suddenly start becoming much more comfortable.
Nice strawman. This is the most hilariously disingenuous groupspeak on SF. My EGs are more comfortable than some terribad junk from Macy's, but my Adidas basketball shoes ($130) are *much* more comfortable than either of those. Seriously guys. Fine shoes are not more comfortable than athletic shoes. Suits are not more comfortable than t-shirts and hoodies. Leave that MC shit in MC.
post #80 of 118
I don't get the RL bashing in this thread.
post #81 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicguy View Post
I don't get the RL bashing in this thread.

The usual SF: "it's made in China", and "my mom has heard of it".
post #82 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenanyu View Post
The usual SF: "it's made in China", and "my mom has heard of it".
Or ... not enough to show for the money. I'm really not fond of paying for advertising. There's always the why buy RLPL when for the same price one can buy bespoke on Savile Row. Of course, this assumes one can articulate what one wants ... and a good many here can indeed do so.
post #83 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amelorn View Post
The average person (circa 100 IQ) is part of an ignorant demographic conglomerate. They're comparing their "baller" 3 figure sneakers against the cheapest, black, square toed shoes from Payless ShoeSource. Not fair. Once you start buying leather upper and leather soled shoes, (circa $85 and up), shoes suddenly start becoming much more comfortable.


I'm not sure what you are even talking about.

Someone wondered why so many American men exclusively wear sneakers. I made the following claims:

1.) When it comes to footwear, the average American male cares only about comfort.
2.) Running shoes / sneaker are much more comfortable than proper shoes.

Perhaps 2 can be amended to "running shoes are much more comfortable than proper shoes that are less than an order of magnitude more expensive." Maybe a 3rd point should be added: "The average American male won't pay more than $100 for a pair of shoes." But I think the point remains the same.

Two people said my post was bullshit. Which of my claims are incorrect?
post #84 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenanyu View Post
Fine shoes are not more comfortable than athletic shoes.
Suits are not more comfortable than t-shirts and hoodies.
It might depend on what one is accustomed to wearing. I grew up in a home where coat and tie was required for dinner ... and I mean every evening. I've always felt more comfortable in coat and oxfords than in a hoodie and athletic shoes.
post #85 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by austinite View Post
Two people said my post was bullshit. Which of my claims are incorrect?

The one below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by austinite View Post
Running shoes / sneaker are much more comfortable than proper shoes.

You could only claim your point was 'correct' after you amended it. It isn't good enough to mean what you say ... you must also say what you mean. Even then I'm still dubious.
post #86 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncontrol View Post
There are plenty of legitimate reasons to dislike America, get over your shitty sense of nationalism.

This is the most Canadian comment I've ever read.
post #87 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenanyu View Post
Nice strawman.

This is the most hilariously disingenuous groupspeak on SF. My EGs are more comfortable than some terribad junk from Macy's, but my Adidas basketball shoes ($130) are *much* more comfortable than either of those. Seriously guys.

Fine shoes are not more comfortable than athletic shoes.
Suits are not more comfortable than t-shirts and hoodies.

Leave that MC shit in MC.

Strawman? Not particularly. I care little for your personal preference. It was the manner in which you appealed to the average person and passed off their opinion as truth. My original question was not which was more comfortable, but why the average American slob goes for sneakers. That they believe have found sneakers more comfortable than bottom-of-the-barrel $20 shoes is the (most likely) answer. The fighting words arose that assumption was passed for truth.

Quote:
It might depend on what one is accustomed to wearing. I grew up in a home where coat and tie was required for dinner ... and I mean every evening. I've always felt more comfortable in coat and oxfords than in a hoodie and athletic shoes.

From my memory, I've always had a preference for worsted wool myself. I wore it virtually every day from age 12 to the present in some form. Regarding the hand of the fabric and overall comfort, worsted wool utterly surpasses most (if not all) mass market denim. For the price of premium and super-premium denim, I'd now be into cashmere and high fashion trousers.

As for sneakers, they're perfect for their purpose: exercising. Their characteristics of a cushioned inside and lightweight construction are perfect for most athletic endeavours. However, my experience is that they trap heat and moisture, making them uncomfortable over a long period. Leather does not have this problem.

Quote:
I'm not sure what you are even talking about.

Someone wondered why so many American men exclusively wear sneakers. I made the following claims:

1.) When it comes to footwear, the average American male cares only about comfort.
2.) Running shoes / sneaker are much more comfortable than proper shoes.

Perhaps 2 can be amended to "running shoes are much more comfortable than proper shoes that are less than an order of magnitude more expensive." Maybe a 3rd point should be added: "The average American male won't pay more than $100 for a pair of shoes." But I think the point remains the same.

Two people said my post was bullshit. Which of my claims are incorrect?

To make it plain: I'm insulting the taste and intelligence of the average American man. I'm alluding to a false dichotomy in which most consider shoes: the relatively costly sneakers "pimped" by massive advertising versus their pair of cheap dress shoes (probably their "funeral shoes") without regards to the other options.

1) If the average American male cared only for comfort, why does the average young man have 4.8 pairs of branded sneakers in his position? Although we probably agree that the average American pays little heed to style.
post #88 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post
This is the most Canadian comment I've ever read.

lol

i hate nationalist canadians too
post #89 of 118
PERKY CANADA HAS OWN GOVERNMENT, LAWS......
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


It's Monday morning, and Toronto resident Steve Dorman shares a quick breakfast of "eggs" (a native food) with his "wife" (an officially state-sanctioned mate), and discusses yesterday's poor showing by the hometown team in "baseball" (a popular local sport). After a kiss on his wife's cheek, he hops on the "subway train" (a mode of subterranean transport) to the office.

This is life in exotic Canada City, the capital set deep in the heart of the mysterious land known as Canada (pronounced CAN-a-da).

Like his estimated 35,000 fellow countrymen, Dorman is proud to be a "Canadian." Located 120 miles north of Buffalo, NY, Canada is, according to Dorman, "a nation with a government and laws distinct from those of the United States." It also has a military, a system of taxation, and periodic free elections to select political leader s. It even has its own currency, says Dorman, various denominations of "dollars" that can be exchanged for the many products manufactured in Canada, including Canadian bacon and ice.

Canada City, Canada's largest community, is located in a place called a "province," a subdivision not unlike the cantons of Switzerland. There are 10 Canadian provinces in all, from Nova Scotia in the east to British Columbia in the west. And, much like America's states, nearly every one of the provinces has its own capital. But make no mistake--there's nothing provincial about these provinces. Canada has both feet planted firmly in the 20th century.

"In fact, Canadians enjoy advancements such as refrigerated food, zippers and printing," notes Dorman, an "accountant" who goes to work wearing the comfortable trousers, dress shirt and necktie that form a traditional Canadian costume. "Our industries are large and varied, ranging from logging to automobile manufacturing."

Not too shabby for a nation that just 240 years ago had no electricity.



Canada City
One area in which Canada certainly has the U.S. beat is languages. Canadians speak not only English, but also French. In fact, according to Prime Minister (roughly Canada's equivalent of a president) Jean Chrétien, "French is the primary language in some parts of the country, and English is in others. The national language question has divided our nation terribly, with Quebec even recently threatening to leave the union."
Canada has produced many prominent people who have gone on to great success in hockey. Among them is Colorado Avalanche goaltender Patrick Roy, who says hockey is the "national sport" of the Canadianers.

"It's in our blood, it's part of our heritage, and it brings people together," he says of the sport Canada picked up from America in the late '50s. So appreciative is Canada, it even has hockey teams called the "Oilers" and "Jets," named after its favorite American football teams.

Despite the language problem and other difficulties, at least one Canadianer is optimistic about his country's prospects in the new millennium.

"Canada will remain free, proud and strong in t he new century," says Dorman, heading off for another day of what in Canada is known as "work." "Our nation will continue to be a beacon to those throughout the world who value liberty, dignity and human rights."

Aww, isn't that cute? At times like this, there's really only one thing left to say: Oh, Canada!

This feature has been provided by the Onion News Service.
post #90 of 118
i love the onion <3
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