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What is the Worst Town in California? - Page 10

post #136 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordecai View Post
I submit Valencia, California.
I once stopped for coffee in Valencia. I'm sure I stayed not more than a quarter hour, but that fifteen minutes felt like an eternity.
post #137 of 230
Manton, have you visited West Sac at all? I don't see how you could find it any different from parts of IE.
post #138 of 230
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whodini View Post
Manton, have you visited West Sac at all? I don't see how you could find it any different from parts of IE.

west sac sux but I dislike the IE a great deal more. The delta breezes, the river, and the deepwater channel make west sac more bearable.

To me, hell is 8 lane surface streets longer than the Great Wall of China and strip malls larger than LAX, as far as the eye can see, plus no trees, no shade, no green, and blasting 100 degree heat four months a year.
post #139 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xericx View Post
I liked Valencia. Hot milfs, pretty upscale and they had a Spectrum club gym. very cookie cutter but at least the people aren't too trashy like they are in the IE.
Having spent a dreadful fifteen minutes in Valencia, I'm glad I've managed to avoid this IE place.
post #140 of 230
Chino. I win.
post #141 of 230
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thenanyu View Post
Chino. I win.

Not even the worst town in SB County, if you ask me.
post #142 of 230
Great threak. Very entertaining.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
B'field is close enough to LA and SB that it's not sufficiently remote.

The big name basque places are (or were) the Noriega Hotel, the Woolgrowers, Benji's, and Pyrenees.

The most old world traditional time warpy place is the Noriega Hotel, long tables, you will be seated next to strangers, food served family style.

Woolgrowers is the "white tablecloth" place but none of these places are fine dining.

I often equate Bakersfield to Midland, TX but without the scenic views (not true actually, but funny to people from Texas).

Was out there back in the mid-90's. I believe that the Basque place I ate at was Woolgrowers. Pretty great. The points Bakersfield gets on my scorecard for the Basque food get deducted however for what was most certainly the worst Mexican food I've ever had in my life. My client recommended a Mexican place for lunch one day. So...so...so horrible.
post #143 of 230
Thread Starter 
I have always thought that B'Field is basically, culturally, a West Texas town. Oil & ag, flat, hot, dry, redneck, country music, pick up trucks, etc.

There is BTW some scenery in B'Field. There is the cliff of Panorama Drive, then the River, and then Hart Park. I have to say, however, that's it. The "panorama" you can see from Panorama Drive is of subdivisions, strip malls and oil fields, but still you are up high and can see far.

There is great Mexican food there, you probably were taken to Mexicali, a gigantic sort of faux-Mexican Olive Garden that sucks. Out-of-towners always end up there, the poor bastards.

BTW, the Oakies did not all end up in the Central Valley, a great many also settled along the old Route 66/Foothill Boulevard in the IE. Whites in Upland, Ontario, Cucamonga, La Verne, and many others, are mostly Oakie descendents.
post #144 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I have always thought that B'Field is basically, culturally, a West Texas town. Oil & ag, flat, hot, dry, redneck, country music, pick up trucks, etc.

Funny, this is what my dad said during our conversation yesterday when I called for Father's Day and we talked about my trip.
post #145 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
There is much about Bakersfield that is dismal. But there are glimmers of life.

Stockton has gotten a lot worse over the years but it still has some virtues. Those more northerly CV towns have lots of trees and are very green.

The idea that Sacramento is in any way terrible is a joke. OK, it's not that exciting but this is not about the most boring place in California (which in any case Sac would not even be that) but the worst.

El Centro, I maintain, is the correct answer.

Oh, and the grapevine from B'Field to LA is not hell or even close. The Tejon Ranch has some beautiful parts and pyramid lake is spectacular.

I'm with Mike on this. man, what a bunch of whiney little brats. I think Sacramento is actually a pretty cool little city. great airport, very diverse, really pretty except for the summer, and, of course, Corti Bros! Stockton and Salinas definitely have their downsides, but there is really beautiful country within 5 minutes ... stockton has the delta and Salinas has the foothills. and while the small towns around bakersfield (yes, earlimart) are pretty bad, i will concede that even b'field has its own appeal. i think i'm going to have to stick with IE. or the coachella area. that's tough.
SField, Chatsworth is just another suburb, just like every other suburb you've ever been in. Except for the whole porn thing.
post #146 of 230
As long as we are talking of California's less attractive locales ... too bad Fresno didn't survive longer.

post #147 of 230
Thread Starter 
Corti Brothers is terrific. Sac also has an exceptionally nice housing stock and three really great pre-WW2 neighborhoods. The greatest thing about Sac (apart from the convenient location to get to Napa, Tahoe, the Bay, etc.) is the tree canopy, which is massive and shades almost all of the old areas and cools the place down considerably. Sac heat is much more bearable than other CV towns because of all those trees.

Salinas is not attractive but it is only five miles from the Monterey Bay. Also, Steinbeck.
post #148 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I have always thought that B'Field is basically, culturally, a West Texas town. Oil & ag, flat, hot, dry, redneck, country music, pick up trucks, etc.

having lived in west texas, this is definitely true. in fact, i have a theory that what we're actually talking about is cotton culture. cotton is a destructive crop that really ruins the ground it is planted on fairly quickly. trace the family histories, food and musical styles and i think you'll find that the same folks who burned out land in the south, then traveled to east texas, then to west texas/oklahoma and then to the central valley. it's just one short generation from Bob Wills to Buck Owens.
though i have to say that of all of the places we've mentioned so far, NONE come close to approaching the sheer soul-searing awfulness of Midland-Odessa.
post #149 of 230
Thread Starter 
I have never seen Odessa, thank God, but the book (non fiction) Friday Night Lights was set there, and the town in the fictional series is based on it. Also, the true story behind the movie The Client List (thank you edmorel) took place there.
post #150 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I have always thought that B'Field is basically, culturally, a West Texas town. Oil & ag, flat, hot, dry, redneck, country music, pick up trucks, etc.

Actually, this was my impression as well. My client at the time was in the oil business.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
There is BTW some scenery in B'Field. There is the cliff of Panorama Drive, then the River, and then Hart Park. I have to say, however, that's it. The "panorama" you can see from Panorama Drive is of subdivisions, strip malls and oil fields, but still you are up high and can see far.

I was actually joking about this part. I recall seeing mountains off in the distance in B'fied. In Midland, the scenery is basically sagebrush, mesquite trees and pumpjacks. The two things you notice if you fly into Midland is (a) the landscape is dotted with oil well spacing units...it looks like a checkerboard where all the squares have been randomly shaken onto the floor, and (b) the only place that there are trees (other than mesquite bushes) are where they have been planted around houses, parks, golf courses, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
There is great Mexican food there, you probably were taken to Mexicali, a gigantic sort of faux-Mexican Olive Garden that sucks. Out-of-towners always end up there, the poor bastards.

No, there was nothing touristy about the place we went. It was a small shack of a place on the outskirts of town. In Dallas, those sorts of places have the best food. The one we went to in B'field was godawful.
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