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Per Se vs. Eleven Madison Park - Page 11

post #151 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post

I've shared a similar sentiment in other threads. I was less than impressed by how the food on the plates tasted last time I was there. It may be unfair to say that but I feel the place is much more focused on plating and making the plates look pretty than ensuring it tastes great. I cannot quite pinpoint when this happened but I believe it was a gradual phenomenon, maybe somewhat driven by foodies and all that food photography. I remember only a couple of dishes that used fancy geometric plating back when Humm took over (there was a dish of beet cubes), with multiple dishes being traditionally plated (and generally delicious). Now it seems that every dish is an explosion of colors and dots, where visual trumps taste. I can't say I'm enthused by the idea of a kitchen run by food stylists.
I made this exact same point the other weekend to someone who has never been there.
post #152 of 226
Maybe if we banned people from taking pictures of their plates, we could avoid such a perverted evolution.

edit: found my post from 5 years ago when I went to EMP for the first time since Humm took over :
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post

Had a fantastic meal at Eleven Madison Park last night. Truly exceptional. People should jump on this now that it's not too hard to get a table and before the new chef gets a couple Michelin stars and the tasting menu jumps from $145 to $200 (this will happen).


I'm copying the marathon tasting menu here to give you an idea... Clearly, one needs to budget a bit of time...
Hors d'oeuvres


Royal Sterling Caviar

Velouté of Smoked Columbia River Sturgeon


"˜"˜Vichyssoise''

Cappuccino of Leeks and "˜"˜La Ratte'' Potatoes


Sea Urchin

Custard with Hawaiian Prawns, Calamari and Green Apple


Foie Gras

"˜"˜En Torchon'' with Venezuelan Cocoa and Quince Gelée


Dover Sole

Slow Cooked with Matsutaki Mushrooms and Nasturtium


Nova Scotia Lobster

Lasagna with Fall Spices and Keepsake Farm Chestnuts


Four Story Hill "˜"˜Ris de Veau''

Seared with Celery and Burgundy Truffles

or

Alba Truffles

Acquerello Carnaroli Risotto with Parmigiano Reggiano ($120 supplement)


Vermont Suckling Pig

Herb Roasted with Brussels Sprouts, Bacon and Prunes


Fromage

Selection of Farmstead Cheeses


"˜"˜Kir Royale''

Champagne Meringue and Cassis


Araguani Grand Cru Chocolate

Symphony with Caramel and Maldon Sea Salt


Mignardises

Edited by gdl203 - 5/1/12 at 4:07pm
post #153 of 226
One of the things I like about St. Thomas is that his plating is very nice but still the dishes look like what they actually are. I was looking at an otherwise supremely douchey blog today of someone's meal at per se and I wanted to punch all the diners but the plates looked fantastic and far from overdone. Some of them I could have made. And, indeed, I have made many from the TFL book (or close approximations).

I remember how absurd/funny it struck me when, in Bonfire, Wolfe described a dish called "Veal Boogie Woogie" based on the Mondrian painting. That was 1987 and it seemed like such an out-there gag at the time.
post #154 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post

Maybe if we banned people from taking pictures of their plates, we could avoid such a perverted evolution.

You wish to ban Asians from fine dining?
post #155 of 226
facepalm.gif
post #156 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

One of the things I like about St. Thomas is that his plating is very nice but still the dishes look like what they actually are. I was looking at an otherwise supremely douchey blog today of someone's meal at per se and I wanted to punch all the diners but the plates looked fantastic and far from overdone. Some of them I could have made. And, indeed, I have made many from the TFL book (or close approximations).
How do you feel about St. Thomas's Blanquette de Veau?
Quote:
I remember how absurd/funny it struck me when, in Bonfire, Wolfe described a dish called "Veal Boogie Woogie" based on the Mondrian painting. That was 1987 and it seemed like such an out-there gag at the time.

Wow, ahead of their time. They anticipated neue deutsche cuisine.
233
post #157 of 226
food-bloggers.jpg
post #158 of 226
You realize Wolfe is an author and Bonfire is a novel?
post #159 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

You realize Wolfe is an author and Bonfire is a novel?

Yes. It doesn't make my joke not work.
post #160 of 226
Hmm...
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/28/dining/eleven-madison-park-is-changing-things-up.html?_r=2&smid=tw-nytimesdining&seid=auto
post #161 of 226
The carrot tartar is the most ridiculous thing I've ever seen. Though I suppose they should be commended for transforming the essence of a Chuck blogpost into an actual dish.
Edited by ehkay - 7/28/12 at 11:56pm
post #162 of 226
when they make that orange creamsicle drink at EMP towards the end of the meal, the service pulls the cart over and does it so completely proudly and seriously and with the hint of snobbishness - it's just very hard to watch and not laugh. I can only imagine the new 4-hr meal will be like that, except for every dish, for 4 hours.
post #163 of 226
Bold

Daring

Forward Moving





EMP
post #164 of 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgm9128 View Post

Bold
Daring
Forward Moving [as fast as they can copy blog posts of new developments at other restaurants]
EMP
post #165 of 226
Regardless of how you feel about EMP, it's fascinating to watch the place evolve. I think their appeal is getting narrower and narrower, by design, and it remains to be seen if that will be a successful business strategy.
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