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Why lawyers like MTM suits - Page 2

post #16 of 40
Excellent advertising. It's memorable and gets your attention. Otherwise, the advertiser is one of the typical Asian merchants offering cheap custom suits.

I circulated a copy of it among friends in the clothing biz, and they all got a big laugh.

Incidentally, this color insert has been inserted in both the New York Law Journal and the New Jersey Law Journal.

P.S. The lawyers who have complained are bunch of old fogeys, prigs, and blue-stockings. But, hey, don't they make-up the leadership of my profession? Also, if any of you have to read these publications on a regular basis, this ad is a bit of sunshine. I'm a regular advertiser in NJLJ, and I have no problem with the ad.
post #17 of 40
Her right sleeve looks a little long. Otherwise, OK.
post #18 of 40
I think I can guess the demographic that wrote in about this ad: old-unattractive-female-lawyers. Younger and the more attractive female lawyers wouldnt mind the schlubs I see them work with pimping themselves out a little.
post #19 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee_44106
Is this a reflection of the overall low threshod for being outraged, of the legal community? or perhaps society as a whole.
I think it's a reflection of the high gender discrimination still prevalent in the legal community and society as a whole. Lawyers, being educated in matters of justice, are more aware of the discrimination than others. Even if you don't care about equality, using sex to sell stuff demonstrates a low opinion of the customers.
post #20 of 40
Unbeliveable, a community who represent blatantly guilty rapists and murders are morally offended by an ad with a fully clothed chick pulling at some guys necktie.

MrR
post #21 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRogers
Unbeliveable, a community who represent blatantly guilty rapists and murders are morally offended by an ad with a fully clothed chick pulling at some guys necktie. MrR
Q. F. T.
post #22 of 40
As usual, Dahlia Lithwick has this one nailed. http://www.slate.com/id/2154218/?nav=tap3

"Not much about the ad suggests that women are disempowered, after all. This couple could be married. The man might be the woman's secretary. He may well be billing her by the hour."



---

Jurisprudes?
What's wrong with supersexy ads in a legal magazine?
By Dahlia Lithwick
Posted Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2006, at 5:05 PM ET

Controversy erupted again this week in Massachusetts over the fact that lawyers have sex.

An ad that's run for several weeks in Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly features a young woman clad in a man's jacket, and nothing else, attempting"”and evidently succeeding in"”the seduction of a would-be male lawyer. His lawyer-ness is evinced by a nearby stack of extremely slim books: perhaps Federal Reporters from the year 1207 or takeout menus from local eateries. That's the first clue that the ad is a scam: No lawyer worth his or her salt would accessorize with books that small. The ad, for men's clothing, says that a "custom-tailored suit is a natural aphrodisiac." This would probably be a surprise to a family of oysters or some other natural aphrodisiac actually found in nature.

Still, the legal magazine's decision to run the ad for custom-tailored suits by a company called Jiwani has engendered a small outpouring of enraged letters to the editor, at least according to today's Boston Globe. Which has itself led to a bunch of legal bloggers evincing some perplexity over whether this is really all that offensive. Evidently, at least two-dozen readers of Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly were infuriated by the ad's placement in a legal publication; law being that rare profession in which "women struggle mightily to achieve the same respect and status as men."

Help me out here. Because I consider myself a feminist and I am always one to fetch a pail of water in the service of gender equity. But can someone please explain what it is about this particular ad that "demeans women" and undermines our success in the workplace? Can someone help me understand why the president of the Women's Bar Association wrote in to the publication in question, calling this ad a form of "gender discrimination"? Am I supposed to be outraged about the fact that this nearly naked woman is using her near nakedness to seduce a colleague (a trick that goes back to the first fig leaf, I believe) or that a clothing company is using the promise of uncontrollable, spontaneous workplace sex to seduce clients (a trick that goes back to the first Fig Leaf Emporium)? Not much about the ad suggests that women are disempowered, after all. This couple could be married. The man might be the woman's secretary. He may well be billing her by the hour. ...

The women upset over this ad seem to be objecting not to the substance of it; there is nothing here you won't find in every other perfume ad in Elle. The problem seems to be with the forum. There's something distasteful about a legal magazine suggesting that expensive suits make girls randy. But why? Is it because this ad targets lawyers? Lawyers should be allowed to crave sex, too, shouldn't they? Is the problem that the ad seems to target men? Have the women complaining about it watched the Super Bowl ads latterly? If ads like this one are OK in Road and Track, and similarly OK in Glamour, what transforms them into "sexism" on the pages of Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly?

It's not that the women complaining are being prudish (although the magazine's editor recently called them just this, which managed to enrage them even more). But I don't think the ads should be pulled, as seems to be the case. Sex isn't the same thing as sexism and"”while I certainly agree that the woman in this photo would be a better role model for our daughters in a long black robe and maybe a jaunty little gavel"”it's simply not the case that every woman who kisses a male lawyer is a hooker or a victim.

This reflexive opposition to using anything intimate or even overtly sexual in a legal magazine may be upsetting because women lawyers can't see themselves in that ad; this is the same overreaction that leads some women at law school to believe that sex is for drunk people and that male lawyers only have sex with other women. Shouting about this ad reinforces the dangerous lesson that there is no place for sex or flirtation or anything naughty in the law and that all sex must be sexism, because when it happens to us, it's rare and mysterious good fortune.
Dahlia Lithwick is a Slate senior editor.

Article URL: http://www.slate.com/id/2154218/

Copyright 2006 Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive Co. LLC
post #23 of 40
It seems those objecting are inferring that the alleged lawyer is the guy and the woman the, well, whatever . . . but isn't that just perpetuating the stereotype they are purporting to be puerile??!!!!!

I like to think that the woman is the JD
post #24 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbimark
I never heard so much whining and sniveling in my life as when I played intramural flag football in law school.

And I work closely with 7th grade boys preparing for their bar mitzvahs.

Indeed! Our league is just ridiculous, I thought it was because our school specializes in litigating, but it's probably just law schools in general. We also used to have refs at our IM basketball games. They walked off in the seventh week because they were sick of all the arguing about fouls and whatnot.
post #25 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christofuh
Somebody, buy that girl a sandwich

she's beautiful. why do you want to make her a fat lard?
post #26 of 40
The setting and the situation seem fairly ambiguous, so if I just that ad out of the blue, I don't think I'd think anything of it. I can see how it might be considered in questionable taste, though, depending on how you read the situation. I wouldn't expect to see a Calvin Klein men's underwear ad in a law journal either. Though that might be due to my repressed homosexuality issues.
post #27 of 40
It's unfortunate that groups that claim to champion a cause for the masses so often really only serve themselves. Although not limited to this movement by any means, the so called women's movement has given certain things to a handful of ambitious women and women who dislike men in the name of sisterhood but in fact have left the great bulk of women in the USA worse off than before, confused in their roles, unhappy with themselves and the way men interact with them.

I have seen that the legal profession attracts more than it's fair share of talentless bullies (both men and women) and the viragos will write the letters.

Fanatics have taken over in so many arenas because they have discovered the art of lobbying and they just wont give up. Isnt that what a fanatic is? You either convert or you have to eliminate them. The moderates always say, it's not a big deal, let's just get along, until one day you wake up and you cant have any adds without the permission of the "victims" or opressed". But, again who's going to fight for their right to see this ad continued?
post #28 of 40
As a lawyer, and as a regular person, I find the ad appalling. I mean, how dare she tug at his tie like that? "Get your paws off my damn tie woman, you're ruining the roll."
post #29 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
This is clearly the best advertisement ever.
Except you can't see his shoes.
post #30 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRogers
Unbeliveable, a community who represent blatantly guilty rapists and murders are morally offended by an ad with a fully clothed chick pulling at some guys necktie.

MrR
Well, the criticism of the ad is ridiculous, but that post is equally so. Assuming for the sake of discussion the ad were inarguably sexist and misogynistic, how does the fact that the Constitution entitles every criminal defendant to a defense somehow disqualify lawyers from objecting to the (theoretically) offensive ad.
Or wait - maybe it wasn't the legal profession, but rather the Christian Coalition, you were referring to. My bad.
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