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My adventures in (DIY) shoemaking -- part 16: The Budapest Chapter

post #1 of 34
Thread Starter 
So, this is a pair of shoes made during a 2 week visit to Marcel Mrsan's workshop (Koronya Shoes) in Budapest. First off, many, many thanks to Marcel and his team. I learned a ton, was very impressed by the training I received, and was humbled in observing the skill and speed with which Marcel works.

This is a pair of full-brogue (a.k.a. wingtip) derbies, made on my soft chisel toe last. The pattern for this pair was made by Marcel's pattern-maker, Audrey. I did the sewing/closing of the upper, under the supervision of Marcel's closer, Erika. And, finally, the 'making' was done under the supervision of, and with frequent assistance from, Marcel. I believe the leather is a crust leather, which I have burnished with various waxes since my return to the states.

Many small 'tricks' that Marcel demostrated to me have helped refine the appearance of these shoes relative to those which I have previously completed (for the most recent pair, see here: http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=241566).







post #2 of 34
Good job.
post #3 of 34
Those look nice. What last did you use? Do you have a last that is molded from your own foot?
post #4 of 34
Nice last, they would look very nice with a bit of burnishing or antiquing, I would like to see some pics of them post burnishing.
post #5 of 34
in my opinion these are much better than the last pair. excellent work
post #6 of 34
Those are great.
post #7 of 34
Waiting to see what Fritzl says.
post #8 of 34
Could you describe the "tricks" Marcel taught you?
post #9 of 34
Methinks that all your shoemaking threads should be merged and pinned.

I greatly enjoy seeing your progress.
post #10 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
Could you describe the "tricks" Marcel taught you?

He could tell you, but then he'd have to kill you. Duh.
post #11 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsgleason View Post
Those look nice. What last did you use? Do you have a last that is molded from your own foot?
I have a pair of bespoke lasts that were made for my feet. FWIW, a last is not molded from your foot, it is carved based on the measurements and shape of your foot.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanguis Mortuum View Post
Nice last, they would look very nice with a bit of burnishing or antiquing, I would like to see some pics of them post burnishing.

Well, these do have a fair amount of burnishing on the toes; I don't want to have too much/too dark burnishing on the toes, as it would contrast too much with the remainder of the shoes. However, I may darken the balance of the shoes a bit -- they are perhaps a bit pale for my taste --, which would then allow a bit more burnishing of the toes. Here are a couple more pics that show the burnishing a bit better.






Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
Could you describe the "tricks" Marcel taught you?
Lots of little things throughout the making process, such as preshaping the heel counter, ways to pull the insole to get it to sit better on the last, how to last the heel a bit better, preparing the toe puff to show the toe shape off, how to properly hammer the upper around the edge of the last to improve the welt's appearance, how to shape the first heel lift prior to applying it, how to do a better beveled waist, how to get the heel tight to the upper, etc., etc.. Really, just a lot of small techniques that lead to a better looking finished product.
post #12 of 34
As always, a beautiful and impressive job.
post #13 of 34
I love threads like this. Thanks for posting. Those shoes are beautiful by the way, lovely color.
post #14 of 34
I would buy that shoe. Great work!
post #15 of 34
Fantastic. Congratulations.
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