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I am a coffee/tea drinker - Page 3

post #31 of 80
Both, but vastly prefer coffee. Three tablespoons, fresh ground Colombian Supremo, per cup. Served, black of course.

post #32 of 80
Green tea, Japanese Sencha. Love the stuff.
post #33 of 80
T-bag tea, with milk, no sugar - 2 or 3 mugs a day. I drink Yorkshire tea at the moment. After dinner at home I'll have a mint tea, though it's not strictly tea, and after dinner in a restaurant I'll often have an espresso or a cappucino, though I find drinking coffee in the day time gives me foul breath.
post #34 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin
...

Coffee means truck stops at midnight and kitchens at dawn. It means that iconic 1942 painting by Edward Hopper "Nighthawks at the Diner," with its white ceramic coffee mugs, its gray coffee urns. Hopper was a New Yorker, but "Nighthawks" seems steeped in an especially Midwestern sort of lonesomeness in large, empty spaces, in a sense of desolation held at arm's length by the promise of a free refill.

Coffee is the philosophical opposite of tea, that delicate laced-doily of a drink. Lipton just began selling a newfangled kind of teabag, a pyramid-shaped thing, that's so lovely and precious looking that you wonder if it belongs in a mug or an art museum.

But there's a fundamental difference between coffee people and tea people, a cultural divide that cuts across movies, and TV, and literature, and life. Even though tea can pack as much or more caffeine as coffee, and even though tea drinking predates coffee drinking by at least four centuries, their images belie those realities. Coffee is scraped knuckles and bum luck; tea is an extended pinkie and inherited wealth.

It's true that coffee has been muted and tamed in recent years. It's been tricked out with cute new names. For a time, it seemed to lose its beautifully bitter edge. But coffee is making a comeback, real coffee, that is.

So it's out with the lattes and in with the lunch counters, counters at which working stiffs sit, hunched over their battered mugs of Joe. Not a cafe mocha; just a cup of mud. Not Starbucks; Steinbeck.

From the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, October 18, 2006

No offense to Jim Lehrer, but that is pretty lazy USA-centric reverse snobbery laden working class hero crap. Coffee is the Nestle middle classes and fancy foreign confections. Tea is served to picketing Miners in the North of England, poured out of battered thermos's into cracked and stained Union mugs. Milky and sweet tea was dished out to the masses of Midlands munitions factory workers in World War 2, it was used to placate Grandparents cowering in the Anderson Shelters and London Underground in the Blitz. Coffee is advertised using Tuxedo's and Art Nuveau, Tea uses cartoon Yorkshiremen in flat-caps and chimps dressed as people.

A Cuppa Joe from diner, truckstop or Hopper painting is the antithesis of a cracked mug of tea from the greasy spoon on the corner, or going cold on the counter of a kitchen-sink drama by Ken Loach is it? I think not.
post #35 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrysalid
after dinner in a restaurant I'll often have an espresso or a cappucino, .

You pour all that milk onto a full stomach? Insanity.
A macchiato, maybe. A cappucino, never.
post #36 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrysalid
No offense to Jim Lehrer, but that is pretty lazy USA-centric reverse snobbery laden working class hero crap. Coffee is the Nestle middle classes and fancy foreign confections. Tea is served to picketing Miners in the North of England, poured out of battered thermos's into cracked and stained Union mugs. Milky and sweet tea was dished out to the masses of Midlands munitions factory workers in World War 2, it was used to placate Grandparents cowering in the Anderson Shelters and London Underground in the Blitz. Coffee is advertised using Tuxedo's and Art Nuveau, Tea uses cartoon Yorkshiremen in flat-caps and chimps dressed as people.

A Cuppa Joe from diner, truckstop or Hopper painting is the antithesis of a cracked mug of tea from the greasy spoon on the corner, or going cold on the counter of a kitchen-sink drama by Ken Loach is it? I think not.

In America though, his sweeping generalizations (not generalisations ) have a definite ring of truth. That it's different in the UK is unsurprising.
post #37 of 80
Couple of espressos in the morning, a couple in the afternoon and one after dinner.
post #38 of 80
Quote:
even though tea drinking predates coffee drinking by at least four centuries
Europeans were drinking coffee before tea. Which is why black tea was the tea of choice, it was closer to the color/taste of the coffee they were used to when tea was first introduced there.
post #39 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by javyn
Europeans were drinking coffee before tea. Which is why black tea was the tea of choice, it was closer to the color/taste of the coffee they were used to when tea was first introduced there.

I saw an interesting documentary called Black Coffee awhile ago. Goes into detail about the origins of coffee in Africa, how coffee shops developed in the middle east, then spread to Europe. It discusses social, political, and economic impact of coffee. Then how coffee spread to the new world. I forgot the exact reason why there was a switch to tea from coffee for a while, but the film discussed it.
post #40 of 80
I like a nice old Earl Grey with honey and cream. Great relaxant.
post #41 of 80
I drink about 50/50 tea and coffee, with tea gaining popularity with me since its winter time. I love tea so much, my favorite is Silver Needle white tea, and some black tea blends.

Coffee my favorite orgins are Sumatra, Kona, and Jamaica. I prefer dark and strong. I love drinking espresso like regular coffee, the girls at the local campus coffee shop think its funny how I will order a quad shot of espresso and top it off with another 15 oz of coffee. Its my "eye opener".
post #42 of 80
The Nordstroms Cafe has a very nice coffee drink. It is a sort of iced drink, like a malt.
post #43 of 80
I drink a lot of chai, usually home-brewed, and even more coffee. I also enjoy chamomile with milk before bed, and the occasional cup of green.
post #44 of 80
I like coffee of all kinds, my preference is fresh ground french roast. I like it brutally strong and black. That being said, I can also drink copious quantities of shitty diner coffee(also black). The local Denny's used to have a pot reserved for me at 1am. I'd drink four or five pots while I wrote and then go home. Tea, I am fond of loose leaf greens and bagged English Breakfast and Earl Grey.
post #45 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Britalian
You pour all that milk onto a full stomach? Insanity.
A macchiato, maybe. A cappucino, never.

I was taught to make cappucino with the smallest dash of milk, or none at all, then just spooned froth on top of the very dark coffee, in a small coffee cup. Basically like a macchiato made with a small black coffee rather than a single shot of espresso. I could never drink the latte' in a bowl that is served in some places. That reminds me:

"Excuse me miss, there seems to be a mistake. I believe I ordered the large cappuccino. Hello?!"

Macchiato's are good, but are tricky to find in my provincial English town (Birmingham), and I find nothing more frustrating than trying to explain what I want to patently disinterested serving staff.

I was also using the restaurant setting to say that I don't drink either instant, percolated or cafetiere'd coffee - Mellow Birds wont make me smile . I agree that for the post-meal lactose-sensitive espresso is certainly the only way to go.
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