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First bespoke- but what to ask for? - Page 2

post #16 of 43
i think were fairly the same size of huge lol! what has worked for me is milanese silhouette. do a search. st.andrews, corneliani, luciano barbera, etc.. i would go medium grey 3 roll 2 1/2 straight flapped pockets you can tuck in. i think they call that jetted. not sure. i'd pick dormeiul too but more because of tradition in my family. not so high but not so low rise. double reverse pleats. regular sized cuffs. overall i wouldn't get something too bespokey unless you have wanted that detail in a suit for a long time. i had hacking pockets on a pinstripe fabric with mine. just concentrate on fit.
post #17 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvrhye View Post
That's glen plaid. It has a long business history, so you should be fine. chalk stripes are the wider stripes that look like they were drawn with a stick of chalk. I'd call that mid grey.
Thanks for the clarification. Looks like I have to choose some colour between a solid vs lighter grey stripe/check I think someone suggested that for a first bespoke I should go simpler which I tend to agree with. As I understand it patterns need to be matched..
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post
Seeing you are from Sydney you should ask over on the Australian Members thread. Theres people from Sydney there. I might add that the general consensus is that Singapore is not a good place for suit making - with the odd exception. People from Singapore go to HK for clothes.
I'm not in HK unfortunately - but this knowledge can be re-used when I get there
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jangofett View Post
Aussie Aussie Aussie!
Thank you for your comments as well I'm a definite fan of royal/prussian blue so it was always going to be any variety of that blue to bluey-purple. Not keen on the upside down suit lol I have a few reasons to get my own fabric, none of which are -really- remaining as I continue to learn from this thread and other readings. Firstly I like the idea of supporting a fabric maker that's on the tc forums and recommended by Sator. Secondly I like choosing my own thing and not being constrained by local availability. Thirdly I like the involvement. Lastly, I can always use something on-site if I decide to and save the fabric for another day; I can't do this if I don't have it and may be stuck with a limited selection that might be catering to the local market... so I'm trying to mitigate the fact I really don't know what to expect. Not sure if those reasons are valid however, maybe I go there and regret it. The quoted price was from $950SGD depending on fabric and $850SGD for CMT.. so perhaps it's not really that big of a difference. Purchasing direct was around $200AUD so price wise I believe it's negligible (and may even be more expensive as I'm paying retail + postage). Not sure... I might get swamped with work the last minute and not be able to order so that'll decide for me heh.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post
bam
"I'd appreciate it if you didn't bam the lady" "I'd appreciate it if I did" heh
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post
Straight, flapped side pockets make sense and not having an outside ticket pocket is fine. Patch pockets are a huge NO. Lapel size - have a look around you and see what other people have and you like. Do not be too extreme a good suit should last for years and what is today's fashion may be dreadful just tomorrow. What you do need to think about is all the all detail features that you want. Coat Vents Lining - contrast colour or matching Inside pockets - how many and what size. Remember that they do not have to be what the tailor wants- it is what you want. So if you want one for your i-Pod on the right, get one. Zips on any of them? You do not need to restrict your self to the standard four (2 breast, pen and one ticket), I have eight to fit in with how how want to use the coat. A good example of "incognito with some eccentricities only noticeable to those who take a second look". Lapel button hole is for a flower - say at a wedding. Good idea to have one with the loop behind to retain the stem of the flower. Trousers Fly - zip or button belt or self adjusters - if the latter what type. Cuffs (turn ups) or not slant or straight side pockets Two back pockets with button/hole fastening I assume. Fob pocket. Write your choices down before you go to remond you. If you are new to this , it is so easy to forget some detail and that is not in your interests. Finally do not be put off if the man does not want to do something - it is YOUR suit not his and letting him get away with the least work is not sensible.
Awesome -thank you. You've given me more to search up on and I will print this entire thread to make sure I haven't missed anything. Excellent recommendation on pockets! I had already thought about this and 100% was going to request what I enjoy most on my current suits which are the 4 pockets you mention. It's perfect for me as I use my ticket pockets for business cards and the rest of wallet, phone and pen. It would have never occurred to me to get an iphone pocket however. Wonderful idea! Thank you for explaining what the lapel hole is for and how it should be to be functional. I see now on my existing suits they are not (though for the price perhaps should be). Ripped off but wiser now thank you!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanguis Mortuum View Post
It's for your boutonnière, and the only reason for it to not be functional is to save money on cheap suits. Make sure it's a straight buttonhole and not a key-hole shaped one like ones which actually take a button.
Thanks for stopping by and explaining this with the proper terminology. Interestingly on my jacket that is currently out it appears to be a keyhole shape, that is, a straight slit with a slight rounded "bay" at the lower end. There is no way it has a corresponding button or could reasonably be said to have a practical button related application.. So I'm wondering when you say to make sure it's a straight hole is this because the cheaper suits just use the same pattern as a buttonhole thereby making it less desirable? Can you explain this further please? Also I should say thank you for responding to my enquiry in the 'ask a quick question' thread about a pea coat vent that kept standing up. I read your reply but didn't answer as the thread had moved on- so thanks for that also! Man what a quality of responses. Thank you everyone who has read and/or taken the time to respond! Hope this helps other noobs as it certainly has helped me. Anyone have any ideas on rear vent? Single vs double? Current suit I see here is double but with more waist suppression than my cheap suit allows I can see the vent looking a bit weird with my pronounced ass. Is it bad to have a single vent, I must admit that's one thing I hardly ever notice (so can't even conceive of what others on the street generally have). Also, wondering what a functional cuff would be used for other than for the "technical" value? (e.g. it's 'better' because more technical effort went into it). Not really sure I should get this but I may be missing the point? (like I did with the lapel boutonnière hole, which is now something I definitely want to have functional)...
post #18 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by guest View Post
i think were fairly the same size of huge lol! what has worked for me is milanese silhouette. do a search. st.andrews, corneliani, luciano barbera, etc..

i would go medium grey

3 roll 2 1/2

straight flapped pockets you can tuck in. i think they call that jetted. not sure.

i'd pick dormeiul too but more because of tradition in my family.

not so high but not so low rise.

double reverse pleats.

regular sized cuffs.

overall i wouldn't get something too bespokey unless you have wanted that detail in a suit for a long time. i had hacking pockets on a pinstripe fabric with mine. just concentrate on fit.

Thank you - good advice. I'll check out out the Milan-ise silhouette as you say.

Jetted pockets are defined here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacket_pocket

When you say pleats do you mean on pants? If not can you explain what they are on the jacket? If they're for pants I understand that they're kind of looked down upon as lower-end or unfashionable. I certainly prefer the cleaner/non-complicated look without them (on pants).

How do you specify a cuff size on a jacket? Is this where your hand goes through? On a shirt I think I understand that the cuff is the end (kind of like the collar at the top of a shirt) but on a jacket I'm not sure what the size refers to. Can you clarify this please?
post #19 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by totenhosen View Post
Thanks for stopping by and explaining this with the proper terminology. Interestingly on my jacket that is currently out it appears to be a keyhole shape, that is, a straight slit with a slight rounded "bay" at the lower end. There is no way it has a corresponding button or could reasonably be said to have a practical button related application.. So I'm wondering when you say to make sure it's a straight hole is this because the cheaper suits just use the same pattern as a buttonhole thereby making it less desirable? Can you explain this further please?

A perception exists that a straight or "bar tack" lapel buttonhole is the mark of a higher-quality jacket. This is not necessarily true, since both straight and keyhole buttonholes can be made by machine. There's an argument to be made for requesting the straight buttonhole in order to live up to the stereotype, but you should go with your own preferences regardless. I've heard that back in the 1930s, the keyhole buttonhole was more difficult and time-consuming since all buttonholes were sewn by hand, and tailors would intentionally sew keyholes on the lapels to advertise the quality of their work. There's some indication that Hugo Boss really took this to the mainstream, but I'll leave that up to the people on the forum who know what they're talking about. Anyway, tl;dr : both are acceptable, neither reflects on the quality of the work, though the wider public apparently believes the keyhole = a lesser quality suit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by totenhosen View Post
Anyone have any ideas on rear vent? Single vs double? Current suit I see here is double but with more waist suppression than my cheap suit allows I can see the vent looking a bit weird with my pronounced ass. Is it bad to have a single vent, I must admit that's one thing I hardly ever notice (so can't even conceive of what others on the street generally have).
Offhand, I'd suggest the double vent, simply because the single vent might tend to spread open to an undesirable degree as you move. Still, you should consult with your tailor on this one -- since you'll be consulting in person, he is in the best position to tell you what will suit your body.

Quote:
Originally Posted by totenhosen View Post
Also, wondering what a functional cuff would be used for other than for the "technical" value? (e.g. it's 'better' because more technical effort went into it). Not really sure I should get this but I may be missing the point? (like I did with the lapel boutonnière hole, which is now something I definitely want to have functional)...
Years from now, when you've donated your jacket to some worthy thrift, it will finally pay off -- by making it difficult for the person who buys your jacket to get the sleeves adjusted. Actually, you're correct in that it's mainly just for showing off the fact that the suit wasn't OTR, and was actually made to fit you, by hand. No need to be so gauche as to walk around with the last button undone -- it's your little secret.
post #20 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by repp_fink View Post
A perception exists that a straight or "bar tack" lapel buttonhole is the mark of a higher-quality jacket. This is not necessarily true, since both straight and keyhole buttonholes can be made by machine. There's an argument to be made for requesting the straight buttonhole in order to live up to the stereotype, but you should go with your own preferences regardless. I've heard that back in the 1930s, the keyhole buttonhole was more difficult and time-consuming since all buttonholes were sewn by hand, and tailors would intentionally sew keyholes on the lapels to advertise the quality of their work. There's some indication that Hugo Boss really took this to the mainstream, but I'll leave that up to the people on the forum who know what they're talking about. Anyway, tl;dr : both are acceptable, neither reflects on the quality of the work, though the wider public apparently believes the keyhole = a lesser quality suit.


Offhand, I'd suggest the double vent, simply because the single vent might tend to spread open to an undesirable degree as you move. Still, you should consult with your tailor on this one -- since you'll be consulting in person, he is in the best position to tell you what will suit your body.


Years from now, when you've donated your jacket to some worthy thrift, it will finally pay off -- by making it difficult for the person who buys your jacket to get the sleeves adjusted. Actually, you're correct in that it's mainly just for showing off the fact that the suit wasn't OTR, and was actually made to fit you, by hand. No need to be so gauche as to walk around with the last button undone -- it's your little secret.

Here speaks the voice of inexperience. 43 posts.

A key hole button hole on the lapel is a great NO. It looks tacky, is mark of cheaper RTW and serves no additional function. It matters not how they are made (hand is preferable) but appearance is vital. It is not a stereotype in the derogatory manner you suggest merely a marker of good appearance.

Two vents look far better than the alternatives.

Working cuff buttons are to a degree unnecessary these days but nonetheless as a marker of a better suit you should have them. Concerning yourself with "thrift" use is a nonsense.
post #21 of 43
I think you're overthinking. If you're seeing a tailor to make you a bespoke suit, it's really solely his job to figure out how to fit your body. Talking about picking 'silhouettes' is a really more of a RTW discussion. If you ask your tailor for a "Milanese" silhouette (whatever that is), you'll be off to a bad start: he'll have no idea what you're talking about and you'll have no idea what you're going to get.
post #22 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post
A key hole button hole on the lapel is a great NO. It looks tacky,

Personal opinion.

Quote:
is mark of cheaper RTW

Dubious, as both are normal sewn by machine, and either can be done with exactly the same ease. It's a stylistic choice.

Quote:
and serves no additional function.

You realize we are talking about a vestigial element that serves absolutely no function other than occasionally holding a flower, right? It exists for purely stylistic reasons as it is.

Quote:
It matters not how they are made (hand is preferable) but appearance is vital. It is not a stereotype in the derogatory manner you suggest merely a marker of good appearance.

Two vents look far better than the alternatives.

Working cuff buttons are to a degree unnecessary these days but nonetheless as a marker of a better suit you should have them. Concerning yourself with "thrift" use is a nonsense.

To a degree? They're completely unnecessary. They serve no purpose other than to show how expensive your suit is and to screw up any alterations you or others might want to make in the future.
post #23 of 43
What does he charge?
post #24 of 43
a reach around. make sure to tip an extra five spot.

honestly...make sure to be extra specific on the bottom of the jacket. ( ie open or closed quarters.) also being ultra specific on shoulders. After that, any imperfection can be easily fixed.

but a reach around would be pretty cool too.
post #25 of 43
Quote:
When you say pleats do you mean on pants? If not can you explain what they are on the jacket? If they're for pants I understand that they're kind of looked down upon as lower-end or unfashionable. I certainly prefer the cleaner/non-complicated look without them (on pants). How do you specify a cuff size on a jacket? Is this where your hand goes through? On a shirt I think I understand that the cuff is the end (kind of like the collar at the top of a shirt) but on a jacket I'm not sure what the size refers to. Can you clarify this please?
i mean the pants details on my last comments. not the jacket. so pleats and cuffs on the pants not the jacket. if you have athletic thighs reverse pleats work. plus they're the italian style of pleat! not the fuddy duddy kind. i would not cuff or pleat on a pair of brioni trousers but i think ya need a bigger silhouette than that. mafoofan has a good point. he won't know what you're talking about. i brought something rtw to have copied coz it was the silhouette that worked on me. if i didn't i'd just ask for a 2 button navy and another med gray for the 2nd suit with whatever other deets you want. i'd go with the same style of trousers i like plus side vents and that's it. i'm actually switching tailors when i move to another country and this is my game plan.
post #26 of 43
You need to abandon the RTW frame-of-mind to achieve and appreciate good bespoke. To have a suit copied or impose a 'silhouette' you've seen in RTW makes no sense to me. It's like going to a baker and asking him to make you an Entemann's chocolate cake. If all you really want is Entemann's, get Entemann's. Too many people try bespoke and are disappointed because they were hoping for an intangible upgrade over their favorite RTW suit. It's about getting a better cake then you've come to expect, not a better Entemann's.
post #27 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jangofett View Post
Err, since when?

eh since time immemorial.
post #28 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
You need to abandon the RTW frame-of-mind to achieve and appreciate good bespoke....

gold
post #29 of 43
I didn't read all of this, but I urge you to rethink 13 oz cloth for SE Asia. Unless you are as cold blooded as a lizard, you will boil alive in that most of the year.

Dugdale is good, strong stuff, though, good choice.
post #30 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
I think you're overthinking. If you're seeing a tailor to make you a bespoke suit, it's really solely his job to figure out how to fit your body. Talking about picking 'silhouettes' is a really more of a RTW discussion. If you ask your tailor for a "Milanese" silhouette (whatever that is), you'll be off to a bad start: he'll have no idea what you're talking about and you'll have no idea what you're going to get.

Right. Particularly since OP is concerned about certain characteristics of his body type, this is exactly the point of working with a tailor (see the "double vent / single vent" question, etc.).
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