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How can I move from Canada and live in the United States? - Page 2

post #16 of 33
Thread Starter 
what do you mean don't be a deadbeat, there are plenty of immigrants who come to the USA poor and start at the bottom and move their way up. So you are fine with new immigrants taking away high paying jobs from established american citizens?
post #17 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by intent View Post
Lots of different ways.

Most common:

Green card through a job in the US, then go on the path to citizenship (I believe it's 5 years after Green card).

This is wrong- most people who enter for work do so on a visa, not on a green card (an employment-based EB-1 green card is hard to get).


A TN is easiest but subject to the border guard's moods- a grouchy one can deny (re)entry at just about any time. It also does not allow dual-intent (meaning you intend to immigrate permanently) so if they think you are coming to stay they will deny you entry.

H-1B is very popular but some years has been over-quota very quickly making it tough. The state of the economy is such that quota was not an issue last year. This visa allows dual-intent but IIRC, is good up to a maximum of six years, then you have to leave for a year before reapplying.

I came to the U.S. on an O-1 which can be hard to get but has certain advantages over the other two, namely that there is no time limit and dual-intent is allowed.

Your first month will be difficult without a SSN since you need it to get everything (it takes about a month to get the SSN), and you will not carry your credit history with you so credit cards, cel phones, car loans, mortgages etc. are a real hassle.
post #18 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by iroh View Post
So you are fine with new immigrants taking away high paying jobs from established american citizens?

I did.
post #19 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post
This is wrong- most people who enter for work do so on a visa, not on a green card (an employment-based EB-1 green card is hard to get).
My apologies. I thought H-1B visas were mostly for those working in huge corporate IT jobs (Indians, generally). In any case I doubt OP would be able to get one.

Quote:
A TN is easiest but subject to the border guard's moods- a grouchy one can deny (re)entry at just about any time. It also does not allow dual-intent (meaning you intend to immigrate permanently) so if they think you are coming to stay they will deny you entry.
I'm not so sure there is a huge benefit to being an American citizen if you are Canadian, though. Even a visitor visa allows you to be in the US for 6 months, IIRC. Unless you really want to vote or collect Social Security...

Quote:
Your first month will be difficult without a SSN since you need it to get everything (it takes about a month to get the SSN), and you will not carry your credit history with you so credit cards, cel phones, car loans, mortgages etc. are a real hassle.

I got my SSN as a student in about a week, but I don't know if that's the same for everyone.

Protip: American Express will give you an American credit card based on your foreign (including Canadian) credit with them. I applied for some no-fee Canadian Amex, then immediately transferred it to an American Amex. They have a department just for global transfers.

AT&T will waive the credit requirement if you pay them a deposit. T-Mobile will do it depending on reps (I went with them).
post #20 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

A TN is easiest but subject to the border guard's moods- a grouchy one can deny (re)entry at just about any time. It also does not allow dual-intent (meaning you intend to immigrate permanently) so if they think you are coming to stay they will deny you entry.

H-1B is very popular but some years has been over-quota very quickly making it tough. The state of the economy is such that quota was not an issue last year. This visa allows dual-intent but IIRC, is good up to a maximum of six years, then you have to leave for a year before reapplying.

I came to the U.S. on an O-1 which can be hard to get but has certain advantages over the other two, namely that there is no time limit and dual-intent is allowed.

Your first month will be difficult without a SSN since you need it to get everything (it takes about a month to get the SSN), and you will not carry your credit history with you so credit cards, cel phones, car loans, mortgages etc. are a real hassle.

My green card was delayed and it eventually came after multiple inquires on the part of my lawyer and a lot of dollars and years. Six years I believe. I did receive an EAC and a petition of parole letter which had to shown at the border each time I entered and meant and 1-2 hour delay. It was a bloody nightmare to travel.

TN Status was easy pre 911 - not sure anymore - but you do need a letter from a US employer. Best to go through a border where they do this often. Avoid Pearson as that's where they train immigration officers and the young guys can be a pain in the ass as they try to impress their bosses. I found the guys at Gananoque pretty cool. As Jeffrey said, get a SS # ASAP.

Interesting that you got an O-1.

lefty
post #21 of 33
What about the other way around? Can anyone point me in the right direction of pros and cons for a US Citizen moving to Canada? My current employer is putting together a "package" for me in order to convince me that moving to Saskatchewan and opening/managing/running a new office up there is a good thing. What are the downsides? Can anyone point me to an accountant that can explain the tax implications/healthcare issues/other issues?
post #22 of 33
Have you been to Saskatchewan?

lefty
post #23 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
Have you been to Saskatchewan?

lefty

Nope. Have spent a lot of time in Vancouver and Toronto on biz over the years and realize that Saskatchewan is completely different. If I accept, it would be a means to an end and have to include travel back home every two weeks unless there are tax implications.
post #24 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
Have you been to Saskatchewan?

lefty



Hey, at least its not Manitoba. Or the High North. Or Labrador.
post #25 of 33
There's not much in Saskatchewan except for mosquitoes. That and lots of good jobs.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-w...ada-saskaboom/
post #26 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by intent View Post

I got my SSN as a student in about a week, but I don't know if that's the same for everyone.

When you come to the US on a work visa you need to wait at least 10 days after entering the country to apply for the SSN or you won't show up in the system. Then it takes another few weeks to actually get it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by intent View Post

Protip: American Express will give you an American credit card based on your foreign (including Canadian) credit with them. I applied for some no-fee Canadian Amex, then immediately transferred it to an American Amex. They have a department just for global transfers.

I used to bank with HSBC Premier on the understanding that international banking would be easy. It wasn't. So I switched to RBC and that was much better- they set me up with credit and bank accounts but a car loan turned into a fiasco and I ended up being financed by the dealer at 11%!!
post #27 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by intent View Post
I'm special. See if you can figure it out.

Your avatar is just your name again?
post #28 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtmt View Post
Getting Canadian citizenship is actually pretty easy, you basically just apply. If you speak English (and hopefully some French), have a degree and seem employable, you're in.

100 % correct.
post #29 of 33
Considering what's going on, why do you want to move the US? Unless you're moving there to be close to someone you are madly in love with, don't.
post #30 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Smith View Post
Considering what's going on, why do you want to move the US? Unless you're moving there to be close to someone you are madly in love with, don't.

Obama will be gone soon. It's okay.
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