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How to identify cordovan leather? - Page 2

post #16 of 33
Hey guys!

Nice post. I have a question about cordovan. Next winter I'll be moving to a place where it literally rains on average 235 days a year, plus occasional snow. Is it cordovan a better option than calf for that insane amount of water? And what about soles: dainite or commando?




And if someone is wondering which city I'm talking about, it's Bergen, in the western coast of Norway.
post #17 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by miurasv View Post
Does the hardness make it uncomfortable?

No, just like steel toed boots aren't necessarily uncomfortable.
They are stiffer than typical leather, but they're still pliable.
post #18 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galix View Post
Hey guys! Nice post. I have a question about cordovan. Next winter I'll be moving to a place where it literally rains on average 235 days a year, plus occasional snow. Is it cordovan a better option than calf for that insane amount of water? And what about soles: dainite or commando? .

No, some shell stains immediately.
I never let my shell shoes see rain.

Rain can destroy leather soles in a day.
Get a pair of beater shoes with rubber soles.
post #19 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reevolving View Post
The leather is hard as fuck. If you hit your face with it, there would be as much "give" as a plank of wood. It is almost like hard plastic. You could almost hammer a nail with it. Almost.

Don't know about that...

The nature of the skin lends to a longer breaking in period. Once broken in they often become favorites because of fit and little maintenance needed. Also, the character of the leather appears more distinguished over time.

To the consumer the initial lay-out is higher because of production costs. However, if you factor in the way it out-lasts calf and exotics and the little maintenance required added, how it's appearance matures over time, it turns out to be a great value. Then, the limited, great, classic colors it comes in...
A must have in the rotation.
http://horween.wordpress.com/
post #20 of 33
$600 is not not really a value however you slice it. You can buy a $100 pair of shoes every year (which look just fine to everyone) I bet not a single person here is wearing shoes (or any article of clothing) that is 10 years old. $600 shoes are not a value. They're a fetish. Admit it. Embrace it. Flaunt it.
post #21 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reevolving View Post
The leather is hard as fuck. If you hit your face with it, there would be as much "give" as a plank of wood. It is almost like hard plastic. You could almost hammer a nail with it. Almost.
Quote:
Originally Posted by miurasv View Post
Does the hardness make it uncomfortable?
Pretty sure that it's intentional on his part, but Reevolving's description grossly exaggerates the hardness of shell. Shell cordovan is significantly stiffer than calfskin, but it is still pliable and comfortable to wear. It doesn't breathe quite as well as calfskin, though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galix View Post
Hey guys! Nice post. I have a question about cordovan. Next winter I'll be moving to a place where it literally rains on average 235 days a year, plus occasional snow. Is it cordovan a better option than calf for that insane amount of water? And what about soles: dainite or commando? And if someone is wondering which city I'm talking about, it's Bergen, in the western coast of Norway.
A lot of people seem to like cordovan better than calfskin for wet weather. Personally, I think they both work equally well when it's wet out. Between Dainite and commando, I would recommend commando. IME, the Dainite gets more slippery when wet between the two.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reevolving View Post
$600 is not not really a value however you slice it. You can buy a $100 pair of shoes every year (which look just fine to everyone) I bet not a single person here is wearing shoes (or any article of clothing) that is 10 years old. $600 shoes are not a value. They're a fetish. Admit it. Embrace it. Flaunt it.
I think you're right about $600 shoes being a fetish, but I do have a pair of dress shoes almost 10 years old (8 years at this point, and still going strong).
post #22 of 33
If you could get a proper grip on the shoe, I'll go so far as to say you might be able to knock someone out cold with a shell cordovan shoe. Like if you somehow stuck your fist into it, and used the toebox as a boxing glove.
post #23 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reevolving View Post
If you could get a proper grip on the shoe, I'll go so far as to say you might be able to knock someone out cold with a shell cordovan shoe. Like if you somehow stuck your fist into it, and used the toebox as a boxing glove.

I don't doubt that. Lots of calfskin shoes have really stiff toeboxes too, though, I'll bet you could do the same thing with those as well.
post #24 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reevolving View Post
$600 is not not really a value however you slice it.
You can buy a $100 pair of shoes every year (which look just fine to everyone)
I bet not a single person here is wearing shoes (or any article of clothing) that is 10 years old.

$600 shoes are not a value. They're a fetish. Admit it. Embrace it. Flaunt it.

Think you way missed the point, or, are a throw-away guy. Then I would agree.
post #25 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reevolving View Post
The leather is hard as fuck. If you hit your face with it, there would be as much "give" as a plank of wood. It is almost like hard plastic. You could almost hammer a nail with it. Almost.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Reevolving View Post
If you could get a proper grip on the shoe, I'll go so far as to say you might be able to knock someone out cold with a shell cordovan shoe. Like if you somehow stuck your fist into it, and used the toebox as a boxing glove.


Man, you're really into hitting people with Cordovan...
post #26 of 33
some men definitely enjoy the feel of horse flesh on their face. I've seen a documentary on it.
post #27 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reevolving View Post
$600 is not not really a value however you slice it. You can buy a $100 pair of shoes every year (which look just fine to everyone) I bet not a single person here is wearing shoes (or any article of clothing) that is 10 years old. $600 shoes are not a value. They're a fetish. Admit it. Embrace it. Flaunt it.
Who do you associate with on SF that wears such cheap shoes?
post #28 of 33
I kept the same winter parka from age 18 to age 33 ish. 10 years on a pair of shoes i can see. I have a pair of winter boots that is about that old in fact
post #29 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prada_Ferragamo View Post
Obviously you haven't met me yet.

Nope. Of course, most of the issue is that I work in Grandview with folks who think shopping at Kohls is buying up.
post #30 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galix View Post
Hey guys!

Nice post. I have a question about cordovan. Next winter I'll be moving to a place where it literally rains on average 235 days a year, plus occasional snow. Is it cordovan a better option than calf for that insane amount of water? And what about soles: dainite or commando?

And if someone is wondering which city I'm talking about, it's Bergen, in the western coast of Norway.

You can find a selection of styles geared to wet weather environments at some of the US Northwest stores, e.g.,
http://winnperry.com/ and http://blackbirdballard.com/

-- don't know if they ship to Europe.
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