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Best classes for non-business major to take? - Page 2

post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by imschatz View Post
- stochastic calculus .. likely offered via financial math/actuarial science. Black and Scholes is a stochastic calculus model. Likely need to take Master's level financial econ to actually see it, but at least knowing some of the terminology and basic mechanics would be a huge plus.

- Any/all econometrics courses. Multivariate, time-series regression - I recall my undergrad Stat department offered courses in Time-Series regression analysis ( ARMA(p,q), VAR(p), SVAR(p) models).

and,
- Stuff like "corporate finance" is good, but if I could do my whole undergrad over, I'd still avoid accounting classes. Too many people get labeled as accountants, and from job descriptions I've seen .. I'd avoid like the plague.

- any classes that have a lab component - ie: most upper-level statistics courses. Anything that gets you fluent in SAS or Matlab.


ps: I took math classes to get me into Economics grad school. If I could go back, these are the classes I would have taken, instead of all the linear algebra and differential equations courses I took in prep work for my MA.

And if you somehow actually manage to stay awake through these classes, your prize is guaranteed partnership at Goldman Sachs.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post
Much depends upon what one does for "extra-curriculars, volunteering, and hobbies." Being mentally agile in a particular field -- at the expense of a true liberal education -- may get one hired at the get-go ... but it may also leave one culturally ignorant ... and that can stunt advancement.

Like I said, I 100% agree with a liberal education, not being culturally ignorant, etc. But I feel an extra-curricular class is not the best use of time (atleast in my case, YMMV). I was an engineering major and for extra-curriculars I chose all finance, econ, and accounting courses because I wanted to work as a trader. There were definitely liberal art classes I thought looked interesting but didn't see it as the most productive use of my time. That said, if I wanted a job that would involve writing, I would have taken Lit classes as electives.

I consider myself a well-rounded person because I am naturally interested in a variety of topics and cultures and follow through with this interest. For example, I was interested in programming so I dove in and wrote an Android app. This is much more interesting to a interviewer than saying "I was interested in programming so I took Computer Science I."

OP is a econ major/math minor specifically interested in finance or programming so my advice was based off that.
post #18 of 20
Calc, Stats, Ethics/humanities, maybe international related stuff
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odey View Post
OP is a econ major/math minor specifically interested in finance or programming so my advice was based off that.
Odey, I really do understand what you are saying ... and given the OP you gave the correct advice.

That said, once someone is away from college, it's most unlikely that person will invest the effort or find the time to round -- via the humanities -- their otherwise hard edges. But then again, in today's self-focused world, few people find such knowledge of use. After all, it has little short term impact on the pocket book.

I sometimes think that true sophistication is going the way of the dinosaurs. Knowledge beyond that required to succeed in a chosen professional field or socialize successfully within a circle of friends is no longer of interest. Rather than broaden their horizon, most people are becoming ever more self-absorbed in their professional and social universe that very successfully blocks out virtually everything else.

If one doesn't get a liberal education by the time he finishes college, it's very unlikely to ever be gained. The result is a person forever mired in mediocrity.
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post
If one doesn't get a liberal education by the time he finishes college, it's very unlikely to ever be gained. The result is a person forever mired in mediocrity.

+1

Despite going to a school known for giving a pretty liberal education (enforced by a wide range of required classes)...I still wish I had more.

I do a lot more reading by choice now that I am done with school, but I'm not really just gonna go pick up some Kant or Durkheim even though I can't even remember what they said when I last read selections from their works.
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