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Design work I wish I'd done - Page 19

post #271 of 315
I just picked this up (I'm a recovering photobook collector):



It's thin and has the crappiest quality paper, but it's a great idea and I can photocopy the pages to keep the original clean.

Publisher's Description:
Most Popular of All Time is the result of a survey of the many online lists of the most popular photographs of all time. These photographs have become so ubiquitous that it is hard to see their content and they have become detached from their context. Here MacDonaldStrand have reduced them to a series of lines and numbered dots and turned them into dot-to-dot drawings, inviting the owner of Most Popular of All Time to navigate a new hands-on reevaluation of these iconic images. 

More here:

http://blog.photoeye.com/2013/01/best-books-closer-look-most-popular-of.html
post #272 of 315
Thread Starter 

Interesting.

 

I'll stick this here.

 

Quote:
On January 13, 2013, the National Geographic Society will celebrate its 125th anniversary and its evolution from a small scientific body to one of the world's largest educational and scientific organizations committed to inspiring people to care about the planet. The Society has shared some images that represent those moments of discovery and will continue in its 126th year, to provide a front-row seat to what's happening at the extremes of exploration - bringing everyone along for the ride through its storytelling and photography. You can even "hangout" with some of it's more prominent explorers Jane Goodall, James Cameron and Robert Ballard, on the anniversary date, 1 p.m. EST

 

bp1.jpg

1909 | CANADA - National Geographic funded Cmdr. Robert E. Peary’s 1909 expedition to the North Pole. Whether Peary and his assistant, Matthew Henson, reached the Pole or not, they came closer to that goal than anyone before them. (Photo © Robert E. Peary Collection, NGS)

 

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1909 | ALASKA, UNITED STATES - Washing his films in iceberg-choked seawater was an everyday chore for photographer Oscar D. Von Engeln during the summer months he spent on a National Geographic-sponsored expedition in Alaska. (Photo by Oscar D. Von Engeln) #

 

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MACHU PICCHU, PERU - Hiram Bingham poses for an informal picture in front of his tent at Machu Picchu, the lost mountaintop city of the Inca in the Peruvian Andes. National Geographic supported Bingham’s excavations at the site from 1912 to 1915. (Photo by Hiram Bingham) #

 

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1915 | CALIFORNIA, UNITED STATES - Gilbert H. Grosvenor, first full-time editor of National Geographic magazine, awakens after a night spent beneath a giant sequoia tree during his first trip to California’s Sierra Nevada mountains. After this visit, he lobbied for passage of a bill that created the National Park Service in 1916. (Photo © Gilbert H. Grosvenor Collection) #

 

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1931 | AFGHANISTAN - In his favorite picture, legendary National Geographic photojournalist Maynard Owen Williams marveled how, in this Herat, Afghanistan, bazaar, no one blinked during the three seconds required to make the exposure. (Photo by Maynard Owen Williams) #

 

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1935 | SOUTH DAKOTA, UNITED STATES - The National Geographic-Army Air Corps stratosphere balloon Explorer II prepares to rise from the Stratobowl near Rapid City, S.D., on Nov 11, 1935. It carried two “aeronauts” 72,395 feet (nearly 14 miles) into the stratosphere — the highest men would go for the next 21 years. (Photo by H. Lee Wells) #

 

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LA VENTA, TABASCO. MEXICO - Beginning in 1938, Matthew Stirling, chief of the Smithsonian Bureau of American Ethnology, led eight National Geographic-sponsored expeditions to Tabasco and Veracruz in Mexico. He uncovered 11 colossal stone heads, evidence of the ancient Olmec civilization that had lain buried for 15 centuries. (Photo by Richard Hewitt Stewart) #

 

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TANZANIA - Paleontologist and National Geographic grantee Louis Leakey and his family inspect the campsite of an early hominid at Tanzania’s Olduvai Gorge. (Photo by Robert Sisson) #

 

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1964 | TANZANIA - A touching moment between primatologist and National Geographic grantee Jane Goodall and young chimpanzee Flint at Tanzania’s Gombe Stream Reserve. (Photo by Hugo van Lawick) #

 

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1963 | NEPAL - The first American team to summit Mount Everest in 1963 included National Geographic’s Barry Bishop. (Photo by Barry Bishop) #

 

lefty

post #273 of 315
Couldn't stop smiling -

Bianca Giaever
"the Scared is scared"


Quote:
I asked a six year old what my movie should be about, and this is what he told me.


post #274 of 315
Shane Koyczan "To This Day"
http://tothisdayproject.com/

Incredible animation for a powerful message.

post #275 of 315
So this is getting turned on tonight: 25000 Internet-addressable LEDs on the San Francisco Bay Bridge. Is anyone going to watch it tonight?

http://arstechnica.com/business/2013/03/san-franciscos-bay-bridge-becomes-a-glowing-network-of-ethernet-enabled-leds/
Quote:
Each night for the next two years, from dusk until 2am, the northern side of the section of the bridge between San Francisco and neighboring Treasure Island will display a dazzling array of 25,000 LEDs in an assortment of seemingly-animated patterns, strung vertically on the bridge’s twisted steel cables. (Note: Ars will have a photo gallery of The Bay Lights in the wee hours of the morning on Wednesday.)

What’s more, each LED is individually addressable over an Ethernet, copper wire, and fiber optic network strung out onto the bridge for this purpose, filtered by 528 power and data supply boxes. The organizers of the project say that there is a constant stream of approximately 32Mbps of data flowing across that network, controlling the entire constellation of lights. The artist behind it, Leo Villareal, is expected to set the entire project in motion from his laptop at an event at the Ferry Building in San Francisco, and then let his own custom-built software take over from then on.

A computer simulation:
post #276 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

So this is getting turned on tonight: 25000 Internet-addressable LEDs on the San Francisco Bay Bridge. Is anyone going to watch it tonight?

http://arstechnica.com/business/2013/03/san-franciscos-bay-bridge-becomes-a-glowing-network-of-ethernet-enabled-leds/
A computer simulation:

 

pretty unimpressive, good thing is it only cost 8.8 million, usually these "piece of art" cost a lot more.

post #277 of 315
I remember when these lincoln commercials came out.

quick 30 seconds adds that just stitched those songs into my brain for months.... Cat Power actually covered david bowie in the 2nd one. I think the music overpowered the whole add... I didn't even care about lincolns they were trying to peddle, but they did actually manage to make typical american cars look really cool for 30 seconds.
post #278 of 315
Thread Starter 

Those are pretty cool.

 

This is driving me crazy but did you recently post the cover of "The Pigman" in some thread? Haven't thought about that book in years.

 

Meanwhile...

 

http://everyfuckingwebsite.com/#

 

lefty

post #279 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Those are pretty cool.

This is driving me crazy but did you recently post the cover of "The Pigman" in some thread? Haven't thought about that book in years.

Meanwhile...

http://everyfuckingwebsite.com/#

lefty

yup some poster was complaining about an old man trying to strike a conversation with him so mentioned that the old man may be lonely/depressed and posted The Pigman cover. we had to read the book in middleschool.

I remember when Brooklyn had takashi murakami's show in 2008. Out in front of the Brooklyn Museum of Art there were street vendor's hawking fake Louie Vuitton bags in hastily made kiosks.







only the thing was.... the bags were being sold by typical street vendor looking people actually authentic $5,000 Louis Vuitton bags. . its like he's the art world version of an insult comic.

I personally love Murakami's art (especially his huge pictures).... but then again its kind of tongue and cheek because he doesn't even really make the big art himself (its just made by his "factory/workers").

even more tongue and cheek?

he even had a operating Louis Vuitton Store right in the middle of the exhibit:



I get jealous of guys that can pull of the art + commerce + hype so nonchalantly and seamlessly.
post #280 of 315
Technology's finally caught up to Norman McLaren:

For me, the most visually stunning sequence starts around 8:55.

It was apparently done in After Effects using compositing and good old-fashioned rotoscoping. More info about the production (but not the techniques) here:

http://chorosfilm.com
post #281 of 315
Thread Starter 

I find that so watchable. Takes me back to my purple microdot days.

 

lefty

post #282 of 315
Mike Joyce's website has an amazing collection of posters he redesigned for punk rock bands using the International Typographic Style:

http://stereotype-nyc.com/projects/swissted/



He also has a book collecting all these posters called "Swissted: Vintage Rock Posters Remixed and Reimagined".
post #283 of 315
Thread Starter 

 

lefty

post #284 of 315
Thread Starter 

Clever, though I wish they had dropped the last line.

 

 

lefty

post #285 of 315
Thread Starter 

IBM creates the world's smallest animated short by manipulating atoms.

 

 

lefty

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