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Design work I wish I'd done - Page 18

post #256 of 309
A dance made by simulating a technical flaw (ie. jello or rolling shutter) in digital cameras:

Basically, each horizontal line in the video is delayed differently, or pulled from a different frame. There is a link in the comment section to a very long video made with this technique in the 80s. That's kind of mind-blowing.
post #257 of 309
All landings at San Diego Int Airport on Black Friday Nov 23, 2012 between 10:30am and 3:00pm





cysfilm.com/
post #258 of 309
Thread Starter 

Saw that earlier. Pretty cool.

 

Style guides of various logos:

 

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3D or is it?

 

 

lefty

post #259 of 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Something's fucked up as I can see the clip in preview.

Oh well. Hula hooping chicks at Burning Man: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ea3RAkGqYC8&feature=share&list=ULEa3RAkGqYC8 

lefty

That was cool.
post #260 of 309
Anyone have their work on behance or have a site?
post #261 of 309
Thread Starter 

I'm going to leave these as large as possible.

 

Photographic portraits by artists Alexa Meade and Sheila Vand.

 

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lefty

post #262 of 309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
In 1949, legendary artist Pablo Picasso—in collaboration with photographer Gjon Mili, who was then working for LIFE magazine—created a series of images that shows himself “drawing with light”. 

Using a small electric light, Picasso produced these short-lived light drawings in a dark room, where two separate cameras captured them on film for posterity. 

These photographs--in which Picasso could be seen painting light versions of centaurs, bulls and Greek profiles—are surprisingly intimate, because they not only captured the art, but the artist and his process as well.

 

 

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lefty

post #263 of 309
I would not wish to be this designer:

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2012/12/uc-drops-new-logo.html
Quote:
Score a big victory for critics of the University of California's contemporary-style and much derided new logo.

Responding to a online wave of revolt against the sculptural design, university officials announced Friday that they are suspending further use of the logo.

(Old one on left, new one on right)


It just goes to show that the client is just as important to the design process as the designer. Client with bad taste or no idea what their institution represents = bad results.
post #264 of 309
Thread Starter 

Yeah, that's pretty ugly.

 

In other design news:

 

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The popular digital filter and photo sharing app, Instagram, might become a lot less popular in a few weeks. The company announced changes to its Privacy and Terms of Service yesterday that are meant to “protect you, and prevent spam and abuse as we grow” that go into effect on Jan. 16. Instead, as The New York Times reported, Instagram’s parent company, Facebook, quietly gave itself the right to share and sell its users’ photos for profit.

Nestled within the “Rights” sections of Instagram’s updated terms, Instagram and Facebook can share or sell photos (to ad agencies, for example) without notifying users or compensating them for it:

“To help us deliver interesting paid or sponsored content or promotions, you agree that a business or other entity may pay us to display your username, likeness, photos (along with any associated metadata), and/or actions you take, in connection with paid or sponsored content or promotions, without any compensation to you.”

The New York Times notes that using a person’s “name or likeness” for commercial purposes might be in conflict with state laws that aim to protect the privacy of individuals. But CNET notes that the policy presents a problem for businesses, too: “That means that a hotel in Hawaii, for instance, could write a check to Facebook to license photos taken at its resort and use them on its Web site, in TV ads, in glossy brochures, and so on — without paying any money to the Instagram user who took the photo. ”

And minors are not protected, either:

“If you are under the age of eighteen (18), or under any other applicable age of majority, you represent that at least one of your parents or legal guardians has also agreed to this provision (and the use of your name, likeness, username, and/or photos (along with any associated metadata)) on your behalf.”

Once you agree to the terms of service, the company doesn’t need to tell you when or how your photos will be used:

“You acknowledge that we may not always identify paid services, sponsored content, or commercial communications as such.”

The only way to opt out is to delete your Instagram account. But Electronic Frontier Foundation senior staff attorney Kurt Opsahl explained to CNET that deleting an account after Jan. 16 doesn’t necessarily protect those images, which may still be accessed by Facebook and Instagram. The best way to avoid becoming a part of what CNET dubs “the world’s largest stock photo agency,” then, is to delete your account by Jan 16.

 

lefty

post #265 of 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
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lefty

For some reason I prefer photos of Picasso over paintings by Picasso.



Edited by Find Finn - 1/10/13 at 3:43pm
post #266 of 309
Thread Starter 

^ Want.

 

lefty

post #267 of 309
post #268 of 309
Thread Starter 

That's great.

 


 

Van Gogh's self portrait as photo.

 

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lefty 

post #269 of 309
Thread Starter 

National Geo show: The Last Roll of Kodachrome

 

"In 2009, when Kodak announced that production of Kodachrome film would be coming to an end, legendary photographer Steve McCurry saw an opportunity, and asked if the company would give him the final roll. Given his reputation and the many famed photographs he’s taken on Kodachrome, it’s no surprise Kodak said yes.

As a tribute to this final roll, a crew from National Geographic decided to follow McCurry and document the momentous last 36 frames that would ever be shot on that film — the video below is the result."

 

 

lefty


Edited by lefty - 1/16/13 at 9:01am
post #270 of 309
^ Amazing. However, by the end I couldn't help but wish that he had planned the project more thoroughly before loading the roll. Images of both Robert De Niro and a rural Indian snake-charmer/magician on the same roll would have been truly remarkable if the other 34 frames effectively filled the gaps in between. One Hollywood actor, three Bollywood actors, and about 30 random Indian villagers really doesn't strike me as an effective or coherent tribute to Kodachrome's history.

Of course I certainly couldn't have done any better, haha.
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