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Design work I wish I'd done - Page 11

post #151 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post


Should I let this thread die? 

lefty

Please dont.

I'd love to contribute, I just dont encounter that much worthwhile.
post #152 of 315
Thread Starter 

Okay.

 

Quote:
One minute animated video using an interview snippet from the movie "Helvetica" of Mike Parker. Song by T.V. On The Radio: Love Dog.

 

 

lefty

post #153 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post


Should I let this thread die? 

lefty

Nah. I never have anything to post here but I always click to see what've you've put up. It's usually worth the effort.
post #154 of 315
The 1st prelude from Bach's cello suite no.1 visualized:
post #155 of 315
Thread Starter 

Mesmerizing.

 

Here's an early favourite of mine. Norman McLaren - Dots - 1940. In this animated film (yes, animated film. No one called them "an animation" - that would have had you laughed out of a studio) McLaren draws both the picture and the sound track directly onto the film.

 

 

lefty

post #156 of 315
That's interesting, and for many reasons. One of which is the simplicity of means by which he achieved his effect. He's still dependent on technology, but he interacts with it in a very direct way, and he gets something that can't be said in any other media.

I see a lot of stuff today that seems to be using technology for its own sake instead of its expressiveness, so a lot of things come off looking like a technology demo. For example:

The technology and its application is interesting, but I don't know if the shaky cam or the sand particle system or the reflection are revealing anything the dancer's doing that seeing her in the flesh wouldn't. It's more about "Look at the this cool effect I can do!" Instagram and before that Hipstamatic are kind of emblematic of this in photography.

On the other hand, this exhibit is pretty cool for both how simple it is, and how big and expressive an effect it achieves:
post #157 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

On the other hand, this exhibit is pretty cool for both how simple it is, and how big and expressive an effect it achieves:
thumbs-up.gif
post #158 of 315
Thread Starter 

I  agree about the first - the effect gets in the way.

 

McLaren again, letting the dancer be seen but also playing with time.

 

Pas de Deux, 1968 

 

 

The second is quite lovely.

 

 

Quote:
"Imagine a world where we never again hear the symphonic startup of a Windows 95 machine. Imagine generations of children unacquainted with the chattering of angels lodged deep within the recesses of an old cathode ray tube TV. And when the entire world has adopted devise with sleek, silent touch interfaces, where will we turn for the sound of fingers striking QWERTY keypads? Tell me that. And tell me: Who will play my GameBoy when I’m gone?” 

These are the questions that led US-based Brendan Chilcutt into curating the Museum of Endangered Sounds. 

The online archive features sounds from old technologies, such as the ringing of old Nokia mobile phone, loading of VCRs, connecting 56K modems and operators of payphones. 

It is a way “to preserve the sounds made famous by my favorite old technologies and electronics equipment,” Chilcutt wrote. 

He plans to collect more data by the year 2015, and spend the next seven years developing proper markup language to reinterpret the sounds as binary compositions—to preserve them for future generations.

 

http://savethesounds.info/

 

lefty

post #159 of 315
My brother's Industrial Design portfolio, just finished his Jr. year in university for Industrial Design: http://www.mrphilso.com/
post #160 of 315
Thread Starter 

Nice work and well designed site. He could market the birdhouse and the light.

 

lefty 

post #161 of 315
Thread Starter 

John Whitney, Catalogue - 1961

 

Quote:
John Whitney's demo reel of work created with his analog computer/film camera magic machine he built from a WWII anti-aircraft gun sight. Also Whitney and the techniques he developed with this machine were what inspired Douglas Trumbull (special fx wizard) to use the slit scan technique on 2001: A Space Odyssey.

 

 

 

Kim Pimmel, Compressed 02

 

Quote:
I combined everyday soap bubbles with exotic ferrofluid liquid to create an eerie tale, using macro lenses and time lapse techniques. Black ferrofluid and dye race through bubble structures, drawn through by the invisible forces of capillary action and magnetism.

 

 

lefty

post #162 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by nootje View Post

Please dont.
I'd love to contribute, I just dont encounter that much worthwhile.

yeah, this is a great thread. I will try to contribute more. but lefty posts such good stuff, i'm afraid the "work I wish I'd done" is not that cool. shog[1].gif

a few posters/magazine covers by late 70s "new wave" graphic designers. april greiman, et al. they look so dated and low-tech by today's standards, but these were quite cutting-edge in 1978.

Wet.jpg

Screenshot2011-06-19at105250AM.png

image.jpg

Screenshot2011-06-19at105448AM.png
post #163 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

McLaren again, letting the dancer be seen but also playing with time.

Pas de Deux, 1968 

I finally had a chance to watch this, and it's fascinating. A few things that struck me: holy cow, that's a lot of work, especially since he had to do it by hand. The playing with time aspect is very interesting because it goes forwards and backwards in time. I thought it was interesting to show where the dancer would be before she got there.

In contrast, many dance films today are caught up in the trap of verisimilitude afforded by modern technology, and people are trapped into thinking they have to show what's on the stage, exactly. McLaren's B&W film was probably done because it was the easiest way to do his special effects, and he had to concentrate on just the time thing because he couldn't have really represented any kind of spatial aspect you'd see in the real world. Since it was so labor-intensive, he probably had to think pretty hard about what he wanted to do --- the ease of facilitation due to technology today is also letting a lot of people produce a lot of thoughtless crap.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post

yeah, this is a great thread. I will try to contribute more. but lefty posts such good stuff, i'm afraid the "work I wish I'd done" is not that cool. shog[1].gif
a few posters/magazine covers by late 70s "new wave" graphic designers. april greiman, et al. they look so dated and low-tech by today's standards, but these were quite cutting-edge in 1978.

They kind of look like the forerunners of grunge design, a la David Carson.
post #164 of 315
Thread Starter 

Parker, at one time I thought that was the coolest design ever. In retrospect I'm not sure it holds up.

 

AY, that wasn't done by hand so to speak. It was created by stepping and repeating on an optical printer. After shooting the dancer, McLaren would expose a positive of that onto a neg in an optical printer. Then he would rewind the neg and repeat the process a few frames later in the action. He could expose each frame many times to get the desired effect. It's a mathematical nightmare. On one of my first films I used a technique called a cascading dissolve which meant reexposing each frame three times as I advanced through the artwork. If I was off by 1/3 of a frame/exposure at the end the entire night of camera was lost. It was a tough few weeks of shooting.

 

What's interesting about PdD is the similarities to some early cubist/modernist work. Nude Descending a Staircase comes to mind.

 

i_85_241.b.jpg

 

Mclaren was one of my early influences and I had the pleasure to talk with him a few times when we crossed paths at the NFB in Montreal. His most important quote was "that it wasn't the images that were important, but rather the space between the frames."  Interestingly, Monk once said the "it's not the notes, but the space between the notes, baby." I think adding "baby" makes it infinitely cooler.

 

Here's a little article on PdD: http://people.wcsu.edu/mccarneyh/fva/m/Pas.html

 

McLaren was painfully shy and awkward in public. He was asked to give the opening speech to the Montreal Film Festival but was too frightened to do so in person so he sent this film. You have to understand that this isn't a rigged mic. This entire film is stop-motion animation shot one frame at a time. 

 

 

lefty

post #165 of 315
Thread Starter 

Opening Ceremony stomps some ass.

 

 

lefty

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