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Shoulder expression - Page 5

post #61 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
You are confusing imaginary things with real things.

What jefferyd usefully describes as "shoulder expression" is different from shoulder padding. All shoulder expressions can be padded. Or not. A roped shoulder can be padded. Or not. A natural shoulder can be padded. Or not. And a shirtsleeve shoulder can be padded. Or not. And so on. The two elements work in concert with the cut, fabric, and chest constuction to make up what we see as the shoulder.

Some of these shoulder expressions are associated with specific styles that may or may not typically use padding or wadding. That is a different thing altogether. For example, the more specific form of the phrase "natural shoulder" as used in American collegiate style involves a pressed seam at the shoulder with shoulder padding.

Virtually no on on SF wears an unpadded shoulder. Very few jackets posted are made with nothing in the shoulder, and most of the ones so made that are shown here are very casual, often summertime, jackets.

The OP has taken apart Savile Row jackets from many makers and probably the least important difference among them was the marginal differences in shoulder padding. All of them...even Dege and Huntsman...tend to be rather minimalist in their approach compared to what remains common in cheaper RTW with their spongy shoulder pads made to fit no particular man.

Why does it seem that the vast number of tens of men (do you think that the number has even gotten to 100 yet? really?) out of the thousands and thousands of SF members (many of whom have never posted a photograph) have sought out more softly made bespoke clothes?

No guesses other than that they are all idiots? Really?


- B

post #62 of 117
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
... - B
I make more sense when it's you who is doing the talking.
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
The OP has taken apart Savile Row jackets from many makers and probably the least important difference among them was the marginal differences in shoulder padding. All of them...even Dege and Huntsman...tend to be rather minimalist in their approach - B
Well, there was this from Caraceni...
post #63 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
- B

I think a lot of people confuse shoulder padding with sleevehead and seam treatment.
post #64 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

Well, there was this from Caraceni...

I believe the guy that made that now works for Mattress R Us
post #65 of 117
For those of us who like the pillow top.
post #66 of 117
Thread Starter 
Thing is, from what little i have seen of the owner of the suit, it probably wasn't uncalled for.
post #67 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
There are Three Feats of SF Sartorial Manhood. What you describe is one of them.

The second? Figuring out how to open and pass through the doors at Charvet.

The third?

I'm not saying.


- B

I have two under my belt.

Oh wait, I think I recall the third is actually ridding one's self of the belt and graduating to braces. Working on that...
post #68 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Poor kwilk.


- B

Well, I was speaking in terms of sartorial manhood after all...
post #69 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post
The problem with internet forums, and one in particular, is that there are far more "experts" than there are people who actually know what they are talking about, and the "experts" are usually the loudest.

Jeffery, which forum? AAAC, CT, SF?

On topic, you might want to include a picture of the concave / pagoda shoulder.

Shoulder types - concave, 'straight' and convex (those droopy, bumpy, sloped types)
Sleeve - roped, natural, knocked down.

Can't think of any other variation.

And this should go on your blog as well, along with the post on pants corrections
post #70 of 117
Nice thread. I have a pretty fundamental question: Why do suit jackets generally have so much padding? I recently bought my first unstructured jacket and really like how it looks very natural. A little bit of padding would make it look more formal, but who are these people who need excessive amounts of padding as you find on some, especially cheaper, suits?
post #71 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Serious question: Until the final minute of that video, I thought the crooked vs. straight was an adjustment for one's body so the cloth would hang correctly down the front, but then he said he preferred the straight method. So, is it just a tailor's preference? I always thought an unbuttoned jacket should not look much different (i.e. more open or more closed) than when it was buttoned. Sorry for the derail jeffrey.
post #72 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
- BThank you for the video V. Haven't seen this before
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post #73 of 117
Could somebody explain the stitching near the sleevehead of this shoulder? I have seen it both with lapped and unlapped sleeveheads.

post #74 of 117
The seam is pressed open at the top of the sleeve. One outlet goes into the sleeve and the other comes back under the jacket shoulder. The stitch is more decoration than function but it is holding the outlet in place. Pressing the seam open is most common and the topstitch is purely optional.
post #75 of 117
Thanks Chris, that is what I suspected.
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