or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › the worst job interview question!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

the worst job interview question! - Page 8

post #106 of 117
I would say a legitimate weakness that is completely unrelated with and will not affect the job at hand.
post #107 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
I'm hiring for a position right now, and I've asked for the applicant's current and desired salary three times just this week. If I got some of the flippant answers I've been reading in this thread, that individual would not get the job. I guess I'm a stupid interviewer. Oh well.

I have a question: what if I refuse to tell you my current salary but will tell you what my salary expectations are for this job? I find it baffling that you demand to know how much money I currently make. I can only think that you will use that information against me when negotiating salary.


b
post #108 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by XeF4 View Post
You are suppose to say something like "my biggest weakness is i try too hard" or your are too pasionate about your work or some shit along those lines.

I actually said in an interview once "I know I'm supposed to say something like ' I just try too hard' or 'I work too much', but if you want a helpful answer to that question, I'd have to say......"
post #109 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808 View Post
I have a question: what if I refuse to tell you my current salary but will tell you what my salary expectations are for this job? I find it baffling that you demand to know how much money I currently make. I can only think that you will use that information against me when negotiating salary.
I don't necessarily demand it as you say, but my point was if someone gave me one of the flip answers I read in this thread, it would be demonstrative of a problem with authority that I don't really need in my business. Unlike with stocks, with people past performance usually is the best indicator of future performance. And I'd like to understand where you are in your career, what you've been worth to someone else, etc. as a data point along the way of determining whether or not you're a fit in my organization at the level I'm looking. If you really don't want to tell me and you can be an adult about it, that's fine, but you should also know that I've never seen anyone refuse to answer the question to at least some extent, and because hiring is risky, I'm likely to settle on a candidate I see as less cagey. Can it work against you? I suppose. But in my type of business, most positions have a salary range, not a specific slot. I might pay $50,000 to have a person perform it at one level if they're a good fit and I think they can grow into something more (for which they will be remunerated) and I might pay $70,000 to fill the same nominal position if they bring an additional skill set or experience to the table. And where they've been in the past does help me find where in that range I'll make an offer. But it can help, too... if you're already at that $70K level that tells me where my offer needs to be for you, rather than just guess down the middle at $60K and not stand a chance at landing you. BTW, I'm not sure why your "expected" range is any different from your actual in terms of hurting you in a negotiation. If it's below what I was expecting to pay, it's still possible it will influence my offer downwards. I'll also elaborate and say that I think understanding history is the best way to make for a lasting employee-employer relationship. I generally want to hire you and keep you happy, and you want to make more than you're making now. If I hire you on at a bump and you're performing well, I'm happy and you're happy. If I hire you on based on your expectation of a $10K raise over your current, and there's very little time for me to evaluate you in an interview, and then I think you're performing on the lower end of the scale, and suspect I'm overpaying you, I'm going to be unhappy and you might find yourself on the street. I sense in this thread a very employer-wary sentiment... perhaps it's justified in your experiences but I don't ever want either one of us approaching an interaction with our hands on our guns quite like you guys seem to imply. I want, and I think most businesses want, happy, engaged, motivated, long-term employees.
post #110 of 117
^^ Thanks for the explanation, Douglas. It's very interesting. I understood that you were responding to the flippant answers. But I was curious as to why you ask for current salary, which you answered. You imply that my giving an expected salary (or range) provides you with the same information. I'm fine giving that information, because it can be whatever I want. I'm not so comfortable giving you my actual current salary.

A friend who recently took a federal position and I both had the same experience of HR demanding a current pay-stub and then basing the pay offer on that. I was told explicitly that they would only beat my currently salary to the smallest degree they needed to at my grade level. I was floored. So I'm learly now of an employer asking for the information.

I also find it an odd question for a new grad. [This is not in reply to you specifically Douglas.] At least when I was in academia, new grads had no clue what the range of pay was for an assitant prof of X in any particular place in the country at any particular type of school. I wonder how many other recent grads are in the same position. Therefore, the question elicits no information and certainly should not be taken as a sign that the applicant knows nothing of the field/industry.

b
post #111 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
I don't necessarily demand it as you say, but my point was if someone gave me one of the flip answers I read in this thread, it would be demonstrative of a problem with authority that I don't really need in my business.

Unlike with stocks, with people past performance usually is the best indicator of future performance. And I'd like to understand where you are in your career, what you've been worth to someone else, etc. as a data point along the way of determining whether or not you're a fit in my organization at the level I'm looking. If you really don't want to tell me and you can be an adult about it, that's fine, but you should also know that I've never seen anyone refuse to answer the question to at least some extent, and because hiring is risky, I'm likely to settle on a candidate I see as less cagey.

Can it work against you? I suppose. But in my type of business, most positions have a salary range, not a specific slot. I might pay $50,000 to have a person perform it at one level if they're a good fit and I think they can grow into something more (for which they will be remunerated) and I might pay $70,000 to fill the same nominal position if they bring an additional skill set or experience to the table. And where they've been in the past does help me find where in that range I'll make an offer. But it can help, too... if you're already at that $70K level that tells me where my offer needs to be for you, rather than just guess down the middle at $60K and not stand a chance at landing you.

BTW, I'm not sure why your "expected" range is any different from your actual in terms of hurting you in a negotiation. If it's below what I was expecting to pay, it's still possible it will influence my offer downwards.

I'll also elaborate and say that I think understanding history is the best way to make for a lasting employee-employer relationship. I generally want to hire you and keep you happy, and you want to make more than you're making now. If I hire you on at a bump and you're performing well, I'm happy and you're happy. If I hire you on based on your expectation of a $10K raise over your current, and there's very little time for me to evaluate you in an interview, and then I think you're performing on the lower end of the scale, and suspect I'm overpaying you, I'm going to be unhappy and you might find yourself on the street. I sense in this thread a very employer-wary sentiment... perhaps it's justified in your experiences but I don't ever want either one of us approaching an interaction with our hands on our guns quite like you guys seem to imply. I want, and I think most businesses want, happy, engaged, motivated, long-term employees.

I agree with this
post #112 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808 View Post
I have a question: what if I refuse to tell you my current salary but will tell you what my salary expectations are for this job? I find it baffling that you demand to know how much money I currently make. I can only think that you will use that information against me when negotiating salary.


b

I've always lied about that. Never had a problem
post #113 of 117
I'm glad I could clarify, rdawson. FWIW, I have never asked for a pay stub - that's a little bit ridiculous. As for your experience, I should hope that's atypical, but of course I only know the world of my experience. I don't know whether to be surprised or not surprised by the revelation that this occurred in federal gov't interviewing... I know they likely have stringent requirements to comply with and likely a myopic way of viewing compliance, but then again I also thought there was a pretty strict government salary grading system that would put everyone on pretty equal footing. But I don't know that world from the inside.
post #114 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas_jack View Post
I've always lied about that. Never had a problem

I've found that a sneaky way to answer is to give an approximate total compensation, which can include bonuses, value of benefits, vacation time, reimbursements, etc. That all can add up to much more than base salary, and no one can accuse you of lying if they decide to check it out.
post #115 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by divitius View Post
I've found that a sneaky way to answer is to give an approximate total compensation, which can include bonuses, value of benefits, vacation time, reimbursements, etc. That all can add up to much more than base salary, and no one can accuse you of lying if they decide to check it out.

I guess I've always worked for these big corporations where they're not allowed to tell anyone anything really. I felt safe saying whatever I wanted. I got fired from my last job, lied and said I got laid off and even with a "background check" they couldn't find out at my next job.
post #116 of 117
Why'd you get fired?
post #117 of 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post
Why'd you get fired?

money saving mostly. They fired a few of us and a couple months later layed off everyone else.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Business, Careers & Education
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Business, Careers & Education › the worst job interview question!