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Experience with Prep Schools?? - Page 2

post #16 of 147
Harvard-Westlake in CA is a feeder school to Stanford just as Exeter and Andover to the major Ivy schools. These schools all have very generous scholarship, and admission is based on aptitude more than family income. In fact, kids from underrepresented groups (blacks/Hispanics/Native Indians) have just as high a chance as white and Asian kids from low-income households. Legacy plays an important role but those that got in from this batch is no more than 16-25%.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michigan Planner View Post
I've also always wondered about the ones that are not in the Northeast and how their reputations are. We have one right near our house, Cranbrook Kingswood, that has had some big names go through its halls in the past and even now I know that they attract students from all over the country. There's always articles in our local rag about some of the stuff their students are doing or places they are studying, etc. and it always amazes me. They also list their graduates each year in our paper along with activities they were involved in and where they are headed off to college and I've never seen so many kids from one school going to the Ivies, Stanford, Cal Tech, MIT, Duke, the Service Academies, etc. The lowest ranked schools listed are always a few kids going to Michigan State or Ohio State and I would imagine many of those are probably because they are following in mom/dad's footsteps. If I could afford it, I'd definitely send my daughter there when she's old enough. Sadly, unless her grandpa wants to shell out for it, it's not going to happen on my low level local government bureaucrat salary.
post #17 of 147
Graduated from one of the second tier, Northfield Mt. Hermon, which has had its ups and down over the years. It was definitely one of the key experiences in my life. I learned some skills and more importantly values (work, community, contribution, success) that I appreciate more and more as I get older.
post #18 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pantisocrat View Post
Harvard-Westlake in CA is a feeder school to Stanford just as Exeter and Andover to the major Ivy schools.

There are some very good day schools all over the country. I would guess that every 'major' city has at least one very good school (and big cities, like LA/NYC etc. have some in the real elite category). But from a boarding perspective, 90% of the quality is in the Northeast. There are a couple others scattered about, but most of the 'best' schools are grouped together.
post #19 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by montecristo#4 View Post
The downside is that as a parent, you're effectively relinquishing control to a bunch of radical liberal educators who don't pay enough attention. Outcomes range from your kid becoming a stoner to a gangbang receptacle.

http://www.time.com/time/arts/articl...659616,00.html

If it were me, I'd never send a daughter to boarding school.

Yeah, that kind of stuff never happens in public or day schools. I'm also relatively sure (but not 100%) that the girls (and most of the boys) involved in that incident were day students (Milton is more than half day students).

And I mean this in the nicest possible way to my parents and those of my peers, but I am 100% sure that the faculty of my school paid more attention to us than our parents did/would have if we were home. I have a huge amount of respect for the faculty and staff - most of them were really excellent at what they did.
post #20 of 147
It used to be like that, certainly less true nowadays, if by quality you mean "admission to top university" as an end measurement. In the past, "feeder" schools were appropriate nicknames: if you attended the best boarding school in a region, you'll have a very high chance of admission to the best college in that same region. With the rise of globalism, top universities like Stanford, Harvard, Yale et al. have gone global, taking over 50% of their undergraduate class from outside states, with a sizable number of seats reserved for international students, who often pay the full retail for their education. Graduate programs are even more "diverse", with a much higher rate of international admission. This means that there is tougher competition for regional boarding schools to regional universities. So if the parents' goal is a good university, then the location of a boarding school and the parents' residence are just as important as a big name school. The kids from New Mexico applying to Exeter face much less competition then say one from CA or in New England. So if the goal is for admission to Yale, then Midwest or West Coast boarding school make more sense.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tj100 View Post
There are some very good day schools all over the country. I would guess that every 'major' city has at least one very good school (and big cities, like LA/NYC etc. have some in the real elite category). But from a boarding perspective, 90% of the quality is in the Northeast. There are a couple others scattered about, but most of the 'best' schools are grouped together.
post #21 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pantisocrat View Post
So if the parents' goal is a good university, then the location of a boarding school and the parents' residence are just as important as a big name school. The kids from New Mexico applying to Exeter face much less competition then say one from CA or in New England. So if the goal is for admission to Yale, then Midwest or West Coast boarding school make more sense.

I would agree 100% with this. If your goal is an Ivy league college, going to boarding school in New England is probably a losing proposition. It's just too competitive. You've got to realize that 75% of your class is applying to Harvard/Yale/Princeton/Dartmouth - ALL of them are qualified to go, but only about 25 - 30% are going to get in to ONE of them.

My class (a little more than 15 years ago, at this point) had about 40% go on to the Ivy league; but once you did the math and eliminated highly recruited athletes, very smart underprivileged kids, long-term legacies, children of billionaires, etc., you ended up with two or three kids who got in - and a big pile of kids with 1500s on their SATs, A-/B+ grades, multiple varsity sports, who went to Amherst/Middlebury/Williams/etc. And I understand that it's gotten significantly more competitive since then.

If the Ivy League is your goal, you're much better off at college admissions time, IMHO, being the best student in ten years to come out of some terrible public school than being even in the top 10% of your prep school class.

However, in terms of raw education, I think the classic boarding experience is as good as it gets.
post #22 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by tj100 View Post
Roxbury Latin is all boys, so that might be a stretch for her.

Also, unless your daughter is truly exceptional in some way (i.e. Olympic-level athlete, has cured cancer, daughter of a billionaire), you're probably going to want to consider some schools beyond the first tier. Every school in that group has acceptance rates in the mid teens - and the quality of the pool that's applying to prep school is generally pretty high. You probably want to add one or two in the Loomis Chaffee range to have something as a backup.

Meh I wasnt exceptional and neither was my friend and we got into some of these schools. We had great grades and a good interview, it also helped that we were great athletes.

Honestly I would look beyond boarding school if you want to see your daughter. There are seriously tons of day schools across the country which place just as well, if not better than boarding. Collegiate, Pingry, etc etc.

Personally I would send my kid to a prep school, but would be kind of iffy on boarding.
post #23 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dashaansafin View Post
Meh I wasnt exceptional and neither was my friend and we got into some of these schools. We had great grades and a good interview, it also helped that we were great athletes.

Naturally, not everybody is as 'great' as you and your friend.

I'm just pointing out that admissions is competitive - a lot of people who are new to the process think it's like sleep-away camp: you choose where you want to go, sign up, and pay your money.
post #24 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by tj100 View Post
Naturally, not everybody is as 'great' as you and your friend.

I'm just pointing out that admissions is competitive - a lot of people who are new to the process think it's like sleep-away camp: you choose where you want to go, sign up, and pay your money.

We really werent great. We went to public high school together, albeit in a wealthy community. Had good grades, sprinklings of B's here and there. Personally I feel the interview was extremely important and one of our deciding factors.

But yea admissions in general are very competitive.
post #25 of 147
Whatever route you go, if your daughter really wants to get into an Ivy, make sure you give her a change to excel in a sport. The more obscure the better. Schools actually recruit for stuff like fencing and shot-put.

And just a caveat. As a group, the guys I know who prepped are generally some of the smartest, kindest, well-adjusted folks Ive ever met.

The girls I've run into are more of a mixed bag. The sense of entitlement was high, and probably plenty of eating disorders in the bunch too. I got the impression that their experiences didnt bring out the best in girls like it did in the guys. It seemed like it was more of a competetive/catty atmosphere for the girls.

This is just the limited observation of a guy who went to public school
post #26 of 147
My opinion is if the student has the smarts and drive to succeed in a prep or public school and get into Ivy they probably will regardless of where you send them. I went to a mediocre public school in a not very affluent district. I was pretty lazy, got ok grades, did decent on the SATs and got into a top public school but certainly no Harvard. Would have I done better had I gone to a top prep school? Maybe. On the other hand my brother and neighbor went to the same public school and one is a MIT graduate while the other is getting a PHD and DPT from Northwestern. Would they have accomplished more if they went to prep school? Probably not. I guess my underlying point is if your daughter is smart enough to be in the top 15% or w/e of applicants for these tier one prep schools she will probably be smart enough to get into an ivy league school whether she goes to prep or not. That being said prep probably does not hurt are chances so if you’re rolling in the dough might as well send her.
post #27 of 147
Thread Starter 
You're right - my mistake. Roxbury Latin is all boys. Thanks to everyone for their insight and comments.
I think I'm the one getting schooled here.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tj100 View Post
Roxbury Latin is all boys, so that might be a stretch for her.

Also, unless your daughter is truly exceptional in some way (i.e. Olympic-level athlete, has cured cancer, daughter of a billionaire), you're probably going to want to consider some schools beyond the first tier. Every school in that group has acceptance rates in the mid teens - and the quality of the pool that's applying to prep school is generally pretty high. You probably want to add one or two in the Loomis Chaffee range to have something as a backup.
post #28 of 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by montecristo#4 View Post
Can't go wrong with any of these. I attended one of them.

The upside of boarding is that you get the full experience, probably end up with more lasting friendships, etc. It's near college level freedom much earlier in your life. It's great from the student perspective.

The downside is that as a parent, you're effectively relinquishing control to a bunch of radical liberal educators who don't pay enough attention. Outcomes range from your kid becoming a stoner to a gangbang receptacle.

http://www.time.com/time/arts/articl...659616,00.html

If it were me, I'd never send a daughter to boarding school.

Correct answer. Do not give away the time you can spend with your child to someone else.
post #29 of 147
If you ever look further south, I taught at two prep schools in VA and can give you a pretty good lay of the land, including MA and PA to lesser degrees.

Are there still schools that have only weekday (five-night) boarding? A former colleague from Boston mentioned that some schools did this.

+1 for sports and extracurriculars; however, better to excel at one than tread at many
post #30 of 147
Keep your kids in your custody. And keep them out of all boys schools because all those wacky hormones will find an outlet, one way or another.

That there is anything wrong with that.
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