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Do I Want To Have My TV Professionally Calibrated? - Page 2

post #16 of 26
If you only watch it from TV, professional calibration is overkill since the source levels will likely vary from channel to channel anyways.

If you watch a lot of Blu Ray and DVD in a home theater, a professional ISF-Certified Calibration would be beneficial.

As others have said, turn off any smooth-motion stuff, also turn off any "Noise Reduction" or "Sharpness/Edge Enhancer" features. Also turn the sharpness down to Zero, it is unnessary and all it does is produce unnatural looking glow/halos around objects for the illusion of sharpness.

If your TV has an SD card slot, perhaps download some test patterns online and load them up to adjust your settings. It won't be 100% accurate but you'll get it in the ballpark.

As for voiding the warranty, a lot of in-depth and professional calibration goes into the TV's service menu, designed only to be accessed by service technicians. Going into there yourself and tweaking them without knowing what you are doing can potentially permanently damage your TV.
post #17 of 26
What does smooth motion do?
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
What does smooth motion do?

It somehow artificially ups the frame-rate or does something to make it LOOK like the frame-rate is up and makes it look all weird.

You ever notice Soap Operas always look a tad different than regular TV shows, or TV shows to movies?
post #19 of 26
We installed some Panasonic plasma displays recently in my office, and ran a calibration program through them. We didn't need to do jack squat. Same with a Mitsubishi DLP. It even came with little colored filters (gels) to look through for blue, red, and green color settings. They were perfect out of the box. Not all digital displays have adjustments to correct deficiencies you may find anyway. Computer displays can make a bit more use out of this and can benefit from calibration hardware/software where color accuracy is crucial (i.e. designing for print media or video mastering), but the fine tuning is done on the computer (source), not the monitor.
post #20 of 26
I'll post this in here to save a new post.

Help me set up my TV/DVR/modem/roku/blue ray player.

Using comcast for service. Just noticed that the apt has only one cable jack in an awkward place. I need to split this and run one to the cable box and the other to the modem. Any advantage to the higher rated splitter or cables?

The HD DVR they gave me doesn't have an HDMI port and I don't have component cables. I may be able to exchange the DVR for one with both HDMI and component, but what delivers a better signal - HDMI or component? I guess I could connect the cable box to the TV via component and use HDMI for both the DVD player and the roku.

Thoughts?

lefty
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
I'll post this in here to save a new post. Help me set up my TV/DVR/modem/roku/blue ray player. Using comcast for service. Just noticed that the apt has only one cable jack in an awkward place. I need to split this and run one to the cable box and the other to the modem. Any advantage to the higher rated splitter or cables?
If you're just splitting it once and the runs are short (in an apartment, they're short), any decent splitter should be fine. Pay more than $1.99.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty
The HD DVR they gave me doesn't have an HDMI port and I don't have component cables. I may be able to exchange the DVR for one with both HDMI and component, but what delivers a better signal - HDMI or component? I guess I could connect the cable box to the TV via component and use HDMI for both the DVD player and the roku. Thoughts? lefty
Ideally HDMI, although I doubt you'd notice a difference. HDMI is digital, component is analog (more susceptible to interference/loss, but still obviously very capable of 1080 HD). Realistically, again, you should be hard pressed to discern between them. With all of this stuff, really, you should be using a decent A/V receiver. No sense in having 1080 source material and cheesy TV speakers. This will greatly simplify your connection story, basically turning your TV into a simple "monitor". Start out here - you can't really go wrong with the RX series by Yamaha: http://usa.yamaha.com/products/audio...product_lineup If that doesn't pass your sniff test, we can talk some more.
post #22 of 26
Thanks, but not sure I need the A/V receiver. I watch broadcast TV and the occasional movie. I care little for sound quality.

I was looking at a $10 splitter, but there was also a $20 one that they say boosts the signal. Same as cables. Surprised to see an HD cable box that doesn't have an HDMI port.

lefty
post #23 of 26
Well, then I'd argue you shouldn't bother with Bluray and HD at all. HD without good audio is a waste of time. The closest analogies I can think of are putting bicycle tires on a race car, or wearing a bespoke suit with a clip-on tie. Used to work with a guy who thought this way - eventually got him to see the light, and his only lament was how much time he wasted and how much detail he was missing all along.
post #24 of 26
I had a friend who was kitted out with the latest HD TV and sound system - all the toys - who used to brag how "awesome" The Matrix looked in his rec room. Then I took him to a cinema and he saw the light. Literally. He finally understood that if you want to see a movie at its best you should probably go to the movies.

Again, I'm interested in picture quality more than sound as I watch broadcast TV almost exclusively. The BR player was simply cheap enough.

Thanks, you answered my question about the cables and splitter and I stopped a comcast guy on the street who advised me to take the box back and get the newer version.

lefty
post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
I had a friend who was kitted out with the latest HD TV and sound system - all the toys - who used to brag how "awesome" The Matrix looked in his rec room. Then I took him to a cinema and he saw the light. Literally. He finally understood that if you want to see a movie at its best you should probably go to the movies.

Again, I'm interested in picture quality more than sound as I watch broadcast TV almost exclusively. The BR player was simply cheap enough.

Thanks, you answered my question about the cables and splitter and I stopped a comcast guy on the street who advised me to take the box back and get the newer version.

lefty

I disagree with this. I've have several people comment on how much better movies look on my TV compared with the theater.

To the OP, if you go on AVS forum, you can find some general calibration settings that will get you into the ball park of the professional calibration. I would stay away from the advanced options, unless you really know what you are doing. As stated before, you will void your warranty if access these features.
post #26 of 26
^ I agree, if for no other reason than I don't get to pick who is in the theater to watch a movie with me. Plus, very few theater screens have the "good stuff". Maybe there's a misconception that home theater is ridiculously expensive - it really isn't if you don't want it to be. I could outfit a room with really good quality audio & video for less than some people spend on a TV alone.
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