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Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life - Page 2

post #16 of 96
Thin Red Line was terrible. He should have quit after Badlands.
post #17 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal View Post
I hope there are dinosaurs.

There are.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Thin Red Line was terrible. He should have quit after Badlands.

Never before have I questioned your taste, but Thin Red Line was brilliant. I will boo you at Cannes.
post #18 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
Never before have I questioned your taste, but Thin Red Line was brilliant. I will boo you at Cannes.

Ugh. Not seen since release (1998?) so maybe memory is bad but ... ugh.
post #19 of 96
Thread Starter 
Official blog for movie: http://twowaysthroughlife.tumblr.com/ Page 4 pic:
Quote:
There have been a great many rumors and suppositions about Terrence Malick's new film, The Tree of Life, over the past few years. We know that the core story follows two generations of a family (Brad Pitt and Jessica Chastain, with Sean Penn playing their adult son) and takes into consideration man's place in the world, among many other things. But the film seemed to begin as a thing called Project Q, and was once said to have spawned an IMAX compation film called Voyage Through Time. The trailer for The Tree of Life suggested some of the film's depth beyond the basic family drama, but a great many things remain obscure. Now members of the effects team have talked about the movie, and their statements make a couple of details very clear. Consider anything after the break spoilerish, although the details aren't too surprising for anyone who has been following the film's development. VFX Supervisor Dan Glass talked in great detail to LittleWhiteLies [1] about The Tree of Life, saying that the creation of the film was quite unconventional. The script, if you can call it that, was really more like a set of notes that he has written and built up over some 35 years. He has been working on this project since the ’70s. And we actually have negatives that he shot in the 1970s that we incorporated into the movie. So it really becomes a lifting of notes and ideas. And the effects shots broke down into distinct categories called realms, which include the Astrophysical Realm (using "extraordinary source imagery from actual probes and telescopes"); the Microbial Realm; and the Natural History Realm, for which Mr. Glass says “I can confirm that there are dinosaurs." How does all that fit into the film? We have no idea, and hopefully will be able to see the film before all the details leak out. The interview goes into serious depth that I'm not going to recreate here, but there is confirmation that some of the film was shot in IMAX and that the effects work was all done to very high resolution: [Malick] preferred the idea of a patchwork quilt. He might shoot something on a Super 8 camera, then an IMAX camera, then on a digital camera, but in space you might have something based on magnetic resonance imaging or infrared photography from the Hubble. Each would have its own character, and that in his mind would lend to authenticity because you weren’t trying to smooth it, shape it and make it conform... ...All of the work in Tree of Life is done to 5 1/2 K resolutionâ€Â¦ There’s a genuineness to that; it’s really trying to more closely represent the photography of the real thing. And the music and sound I would say are tremendous. The sound design I was really bowled over by, in terms of how it helps emotionally taking you through the piece. There is a great deal more detail in the source interview which I encourage anyone with a scientific bent to check out, as Dan Glass says that a great deal of consultation was done to ensure that the scientific details in the film, and even the implications, are as accurate as possible. [1] http://www.littlewhitelies.co.uk/blo...on-quest-14358
lefty
post #20 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sesame Seed View Post
Terrence Malick? Meh. I've seen enough of his films (all of them) to say they're visually quite pretty... and pretty boring. A contemplative Sean Penn + the overexposed Brad Pitt... yeah, it didn't take me long to pass on the 'opportunity' to see it at the Sydney Film Festival (I'm once again seeing about a dozen films).



I feel the same way. Malick's films are visually stunning, but not the least bit compelling.
post #21 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Ugh. Not seen since release (1998?) so maybe memory is bad but ... ugh.

I don't like that one too much either. It's beautiful, but the structure kinda falls apart and it got killed by the million cameos. Half of the performances were distractingly, laughingly horrific (Travolta?)
post #22 of 96
I liked Thin Red Line. It was disorganized, even for a Malick film, but still enjoyable. A solid B.
post #23 of 96
The guy makes big, beautiful films. I saw him and Mike Judge eating at a tex-mex joint a few years ago. Odd couple.
post #24 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron View Post
I freaking loved The New World. I'm a very big fan. Hubble style shots of the cosmos in a Malick film sound like a feature, not a bug.

What a terrible movie. I was intrigued by the Wagner at the beginning then I get -- two hours of Pocahontas reading a line of bad poetry in a voice over every thirty seconds. I don't know what happened after that because I turned it off.
post #25 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post
What a terrible movie. I was intrigued by the Wagner at the beginning then I get -- two hours of Pocahontas reading a line of bad poetry in a voice over every thirty seconds. I don't know what happened after that because I turned it off.

That's because you're a moran.
post #26 of 96
Malick seems to be pretty polarizing. FWIW, I wish there were a million more of him and one less George Lucas. Yes Peter Jackson, I'm talking to YOU.
post #27 of 96
the thin red line is fuckin' great. that scene where in the middle of the rising tension of the conflict, (marines pinned down on a hill, knowing it would be pretty much suicidal to attack the emplacement at the top, as their commander insists..)... and the camera focuses on the wind blowing through the long grass. unforgettable cinema. days of heaven and badlands are also wonderful.
post #28 of 96
This may be a case where the trailer is better than the actual film.
See: Where the Wild Things Are

Feel free to add further examples... Possible new thread?
post #29 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennglock View Post
Ive heard there is a 15 minute interlude of Hubble-style shots of the cosmos.

i think a couple hits of acid are called for.
post #30 of 96
I wish to see this film.
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