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SF Cribs: The places behind the clothes - Page 65

post #961 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
1961 Playboy photo featuring left to right - George Nelson, Edward Wormley, Eero Saarinen, Harry Bertoia, Charles Eames and Jens Risom
Was this the centerfold?
post #962 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang View Post
Was this the centerfold?

why do you think it is so hard to find a clean copy these days?
post #963 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Thomas View Post
One of my favorite quotes from proponents of the Kansas City metro area is: "It's a very livable city." Like that's something to shoot for...being livable...
Honestly, it's not a bad thing... How many people can really afford to do all the things offered by a worldclass city on a regular basis? Even the shoe fairy picks and chooses his operas... As I get older, I find myself staying in more anyway. I just want more s.f. at a reasonable price so that i'm not cramped and I don't want a long commute. I don't give a shit about nightlife. If I can go to great restaurants a few times a year, even if I have to travel to them, I'm happy. Same for musicals/operas or whatever. For the rest, I'm content to watch on my HD 104" screen and in the not so distant future, my McIntosh/Revel audio system. Oh and I want an awesome kitchen with a 48" thermador range. Yes, I'm cocooning, but fuck the rest of the world!
post #964 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post
why do you think it is so hard to find a clean copy these days?

post #965 of 1906
Not exactly an "SF crib" unless Tokyo Slim wants to try to take over the lease, but I thought that this story from the NY Times was worth posting here. Essentially, there's a family living in a two-story, pyramid-shaped apartment at the top of the Smith Tower in Seattle: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/21/ga...me&ref=general The place looks pretty damned cool - views to die for, including a small "lighthouse" right at the top of the structure, reached by a vertical tunnel. Here are some photos to accompany the article: http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/201...n/21WHOss.html
post #966 of 1906
That place is absolutely incredible. I fear I would find its occupants insufferable, however.
post #967 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
That place is absolutely incredible.
+1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
I fear I would find its occupants insufferable, however.
huh?
post #968 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Animal Thug View Post
Where to kop?

The painting was done by a great friend of mine. His name is Spike Palmer. Not only is he an accomplished fine artist, he's also one hell of a tattoo artist. He's working in Portland now. He did a collection of Universal Studios monster portraits on my right leg. I'm sporting Frankenstein's monster, the Bride, Dracula, Wolfman, Mr. Hyde, the Invisible Man, the Creature From The Black Lagoon, and the Mummy...all done by Spike.
post #969 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
^^^^^

Vag seems high, no?






your apartment would be at least a solid $2,000 in NYC, or $3,000+ (conservative) for an area like Chelsea.

High ceilings, exposed brick, many square feet...
post #970 of 1906
Not my crib, but if I were staying in NJ I would like it to be mine.

Quote:
In 1961 Architectural Record listed this house, designed and built by the architect Jules Gregory as his own residence, as one of America's "10 Best Houses." The undulating appearance of its roofline is a result of its double conoid design "” something that from a distance gives the impression of enormous wings.

The house, on lightly wooded land, was built with natural materials, like fieldstone from the property and Pacific Northwest fir and pine. Thanks to the enormous sheets of glass that serve as windows and walls, the natural surroundings are visible from every room. Most of the interior walls are not full height, so the flowing fir ceiling appears to float above the rooms.

The house has a living area and an adjacent sunken conversation area with stone walls and a fireplace. All of the lighting and furniture in the home was designed by George Nakashima; it is available at a separate cost.






lefty
post #971 of 1906
I hardly dare post in this thread, but I'm actually quite pleased with how my new shoebox is turning out. It's not quite finished yet, but nearly.

Living space (with just enough book space):



Peeping into the world's smallest bedroom:



Which is conveniently located for the world's smallest kitchen:

post #972 of 1906
Stylish pad, Obs. Perfect for one or a couple. Right in Amsterdam?
post #973 of 1906
Have to say, never seen a stove top with just two burners on it. Is there an oven? I guess you don't cook much.
post #974 of 1906
I really like the way you have everything set up Ob5cur1ty.
post #975 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by audiophilia View Post
Stylish pad, Obs. Perfect for one or a couple. Right in Amsterdam?
Thanks. I've actually moved to the historic centre of beautiful Haarlem (just west of Amsterdam). The apartment has a terrific location.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post
Have to say, never seen a stove top with just two burners on it. Is there an oven? I guess you don't cook much.
You're right in saying I don't cook much, though I did manage to rustle up a steak dinner for 3 the other night using just what you see there. The microwave is a combi with a built-in convection oven.

Designing the kitchen was a challenge (though nothing compared to the reconstruction work that preparing the space required) - almost every component had to be reduced-width to fit in what I wanted. I'm very happy with the result though.
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