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SF Cribs: The places behind the clothes - Page 45

post #661 of 1906
I don't know why, if you wanted a lot of square footage, you'd have to live in a McMansion. Buy an old place and fix it up.
post #662 of 1906
Everyone needs to post more pics. I'm living vicariously through the gorgeous houses in this thread.
post #663 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
I don't know why, if you wanted a lot of square footage, you'd have to live in a McMansion. Buy an old place and fix it up.
I'm not saying I ever will, just that I can see the appeal. Fixing up an old place can be fraught with peril, especially if you're clueless about that kind of thing. It's probably pretty easy to get in over your head financially. And depending on where you live, those places are often in more expensive areas as well. Plus, some mcmansions are less mcmansiony than others. What's unacceptable in my mind is cramming that style of house onto tiny .25 acre lots. My preference, of course, is to be living in south america in 10 years' time, preferably in a spanish colonial mansion with a central courtyard where I'll eat breakfast every morning.
post #664 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Incman View Post
Everyone needs to post more pics. I'm living vicariously through the gorgeous houses in this thread.

+1. I would post pics of mine but it's an effing mess with the remodeling at the moment.
post #665 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
Kyle,

I'd strongly suggest you forgo Indiana and consider Atlanta. That is a new hotbed, and there's so many great chefs there you could work for and still live somewhat affordably. Cleveland is a good idea too, but in all honesty Atlanta would be far superior of a choice.

Plus, if he's really nice to AF he can go horseback riding for free. Or were they ponies? Nm, they'd be crushed under the kid's weight.
post #666 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
Kyle,

I'd strongly suggest you forgo Indiana and consider Atlanta. That is a new hotbed, and there's so many great chefs there you could work for and still live somewhat affordably. Cleveland is a good idea too, but in all honesty Atlanta would be far superior of a choice.

Good point in that Indianapolis doesn't seem to appreciate fine dining as do other major cities. The best restaurants here are good, but pale in comparison to ones in most other cities of similar size. This is in large part due to clientele not supporting high end restaurants, IMO. Something Different was outstanding, but it didn't get enough business to stay open. Oakley's is very good, and my favorite in Indy, but it doesn't come close to similar restaurants in other cities, Babbos for example.
post #667 of 1906
How do people define "McMansion"? I have a definition in my head, and it has to do with subdivisions like the one in the first season of "Weeds." I don't define it merely in being new construction and > say 3.5k sq feet.

As to the appeal of size: I think it has much to do with your lifestyle. What we plan to build in a few years when (if!) conditions revert somewhat back, it will be large. Each space has a reason and/or purpose though. I plan to do much in the way of entertaining, both in dinner/social things with local folks, and in having distant family/friends being able to stay comfortably with me. If it wasn't for those two things, we would probably be looking at building a house 1/2 the size.
post #668 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
How do people define "McMansion"?
-high square footage @ low building cost per square feet. -cheap materials -kitschy architectural elements (sometimes contradictorily eclectic) -marketed by builders using nostalgic pastel watercolors -usually in cheapest available suburban lot -nominal landscaping -in a subdivision with three or more of the following words: hills estates quail creek woods trail -shire oak cedar forest lake (none of which are present) There are large houses that I don't call McMansions because they are built with quality materials, even if I don't like the style. If you're building @ under $150-200/sq. foot in most areas you likely have a McMansion. McMansion Mansion (all of these by Robert Stern)
post #669 of 1906
^ sums it up about perfectly IMO.
post #670 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
How do people define "McMansion"?

New Jersey.
post #671 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

This is the worst thing I have ever seen.
post #672 of 1906
The first picture is the definition of a McMansion. Those sprung up all over Connecticut like the plague in the late 90s when my family was house hunting.
post #673 of 1906
Columned Greek temple porticoes, Spanish villa balconies, and art deco windows don't work for you?
post #674 of 1906
I also think of a McMansion as a cheaply built house that is made to appear much larger than it actually is.
post #675 of 1906
Four car garages have a tendency to do that.
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