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SF Cribs: The places behind the clothes - Page 2

post #16 of 1897
Quote:
Originally Posted by spertia
Alessi is the manufacturer; Philipe Starck is the designer. He is infamous for creating sculptural designs for Alessi that only sort-of function properly, such as the "Hot Bertaa" kettle (pictured below) and the "Juicy Salif" juicer under discussion.

There used to be this Tintin store in San Francisco--I don't know if it's still there--that sold Alessi by Starck.

I think it was called kariktar, on Sutter St.
post #17 of 1897
no exterior home shots? I am just as much interested in the external architecture as the interior. Plus I like to see the landscaping too.
post #18 of 1897
Karikter is still there. It is a great place to buy stocking stuffers. The Alessi store is next door, so Karikter does not sell hat much Alessi anymore. They also used to sell a lot of Kartell, but they opened their own store as well. Why do we have three? Wedding gifts that we needed to find something to do with. We hated the idea of registering, so we ended up with doubles and triples of some stuff. I love Tin Tin. Always have. I would put exterior shots up, but our building prohibits it. I also hate the front of our building, although I seem to be in the minority as we have tourists visiting to take pictures all too often. It is yet another fake Italian stucco house from the 20s. In SF, there are a ton. THere are even more of th awful Victorians.
post #19 of 1897
We live in a 1970s modern house and mainly collect furnishings from the 60s and 70s (with a bit of contemporary mixed in). Here are interior and exterior photos of our place (ignore the fact that it's for sale -- that's obviously not why I'm posting the link):

http://www.syntheticspace.com/104shortsprings.html
post #20 of 1897
These are the only photos immediately at hand. Please excuse the image quality. In the background is La Jolla Cove. This candid diptych is about two or three years old. I was "arranging" some flowers in the dining alcove.

Behind and below is one of the living rooms. The wood furniture in that room and the dining alcove is from Maria Yee. Most of it has the Shinto style legs from Maria's Big Sur Collection. It is all mortise and tenon joined. There are no screws, brackets, clips, or nails. The woods are finished in shellac, varnish, or bee's wax.
http://www.mariayee.com/

The leather items must be eight or ten years old now and are from Roche-Bobois.
http://www.roche-bobois.com/home3.php?langue=en&pays=us

You might spot a few small Dale Chihuly pieces scattered about. We bought a few minor pieces in the early 1970s while he was still making the pieces with his own hands.
http://www.chihuly.com/

The lovely champion Bedlington Terrier is a vintage 1991 named Phoebe.



This is part of my clothes closet. The wall of ties (!), another shirt rack, and the overcoat/outer coat/dressing gown rack are not visible



If I am able to find some photos from the apartment building in Minsk or the home in Cargese, I will post those later. I am not even close to having more than three decades of images scanned and the prints or negatives are certainly not organized. Sisyphus will get to the crest before all of our photos are ever organized.
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post #21 of 1897
A few more pictures that I found, although we have moved some stuff around since they were taken. The furniture and basic layout still remain.

1. Guest bedroom - Alante bookshelf in glossy lacquer, Emmebi bed
2. Our room - Same felt chair, Mauro Mori table, Segno bed
LL
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post #22 of 1897
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
2. Our room - Same felt chair, Mauro Mori table, Segno bed

And the classic "Pistillo" wall lamp from 1969!

post #23 of 1897
Spertia- That house of yours looks amazing. Is it as secluded as it appears in the pictures? Yes, it is a Pistillo, but to me it looks like a big flash in the picture so I didn't mention it.
post #24 of 1897
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
Spertia-

That house of yours looks amazing. Is it as secluded as it appears in the pictures?

Thanks, I wish it were as secluded as the photos might imply. We're on a large wooded lot, but the front of our place overlooks a golf course, and the rear overlooks a McMansion colony.
post #25 of 1897
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
Karikter is still there. It is a great place to buy stocking stuffers. The Alessi store is next door, so Karikter does not sell hat much Alessi anymore. They also used to sell a lot of Kartell, but they opened their own store as well.

Why do we have three? Wedding gifts that we needed to find something to do with. We hated the idea of registering, so we ended up with doubles and triples of some stuff.

I love Tin Tin. Always have.

I would put exterior shots up, but our building prohibits it. I also hate the front of our building, although I seem to be in the minority as we have tourists visiting to take pictures all too often. It is yet another fake Italian stucco house from the 20s. In SF, there are a ton. THere are even more of th awful Victorians.
I think it used to be called Globetrotter and was located on a different segment of Sutter St.

That is kind of ridiculous that your building prohibits that. That is what is absurd of living in apartments/condos/etc. that have a board or council.
post #26 of 1897
I've only got pictures of my parents retirement homes... and not going to upload all of them (just the nice one). I currently reside in a fraternity house so its not like I've got more than a big room shared by 3 people anyway. Besides you'd all kill me if you saw how I store my jackets.
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post #27 of 1897
Quote:
Originally Posted by spertia
We live in a 1970s modern house and mainly collect furnishings from the 60s and 70s (with a bit of contemporary mixed in). Here are interior and exterior photos of our place (ignore the fact that it's for sale -- that's obviously not why I'm posting the link):

http://www.syntheticspace.com/104shortsprings.html
amazing house! I really like the library area and breakfast room.

Would you mind telling me who made the white desk in the bedroom?

!luc
post #28 of 1897
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
A few more pictures that I found, although we have moved some stuff around since they were taken. The furniture and basic layout still remain.

1. Guest bedroom - Alante bookshelf in glossy lacquer, Emmebi bed
2. Our room - Same felt chair, Mauro Mori table, Segno bed
everytime I see newson's felt chair, I keep seeing a giant noodle.

!luc
post #29 of 1897
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc-Emmanuel
Would you mind telling me who made the white desk in the bedroom?

That desk is actually one of the few "anonymous" pieces in our collection. We found it at a thrift store in Los Angeles for $5! It is made of glossy white and black plastic laminate over wood. The black section in the middle has a single integrated drawer.

Here is a slightly better photo of the desk:

post #30 of 1897
Some views of our living room that I took for my brother, whose paintings are on the wall.

Aside from the usual Herman Miller stuff...the rosewood credenza is Carlo Hauner for Forma, the walnut credenza is Florence Knoll. The sofa is two Knoll parallel-bar chairs upholstered in spinneybeck leather. The chair outside is Grcic for Magis.
LL
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