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SF Cribs: The places behind the clothes - Page 93

post #1381 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
Rather have the Bueller house if I'm buying film history.

lefty

The suburbs north of Chicago have some of the best residential architecture in the country. And obviously, Chicago has the best architecture of any major city in the country. No matter where my life takes me, I'll try at all costs to keep a pied a terre here.
post #1382 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Word on the streetz is that he put in an offer but then rescinded it after logging in and finding out I'm moving 5 hours away.

That would almost be a deal breaker for me too. But you'll be back after a brief time in the wilderness.
post #1383 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
And obviously, Chicago has the best architecture of any major city in the country.

I'm not sure it's obvious anymore. New York is really outpacing Chicago.
post #1384 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
I'm not sure it's obvious anymore. New York is really outpacing Chicago.

ehh how is that possible when most of it was after the turn of the century?
post #1385 of 1906
Chicago has destroyed two great buildings for every one they still have. Holistically, they still have a higher quality grade of architecture than New York, but twenty years from now, I expect New York to have outclassed Chicago in breadth and diversity of significant buildings and urban design. Chicago has struggled or lagged behind from their lack of a top flight architecture school since the 70's. New York, LA and Boston have soaked up most of the best professional talent, because innovative architects are often financially dependent on teaching positions early in their career. Naturally, they've established their own practices and made a much greater regional presence in New York/LA/Boston near these schools, which has left Chicago without (m)any significant architectural practices besides SOM and that is really starting to take effect on the quality of new Chicago developments.
post #1386 of 1906
Stephen, what do you think of the new Gehry building on Spruce? it's funny, you can look up or down an Avenue and some buildings just stick out no matter where you are. The Chrysler or Empire state, for instance, are examples to me. Lately, 8 Spruce has also been one of them.
post #1387 of 1906
I mostly like it, even though it's a tad gimmicky. I think the texture of the ripples might be slightly too sharp, which makes it look a bit silly/superfluous up close. I wish it were a bit wavier or more fluid, but it's a cosmetic flaw. The steel is still very attractive and it has a good massing.
post #1388 of 1906
i actually haven't seen it up close, no closer than BB/CH 4-5-6 at least. Otherwise I think it's very attractive and makes a huge impact on the NYC skyline. The idea of moving there was brought up but $4K a month is a little stiff.
post #1389 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
I'm curious why a guy like you would want to stay in SF. It's pretty gay dude. Better food in Chicago and it's I daresay, quite a bit more intellectual than what you're used to.
I'm a homeboy, as it were.
post #1390 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
I'm a homeboy, as it were.

Like Omar?
post #1391 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
Like Omar?
The game be the game.
post #1392 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
The game be the game.

you mah nigga' (but no homo)
post #1393 of 1906
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
Chicago has destroyed two great buildings for every one they still have. Holistically, they still have a higher quality grade of architecture than New York, but twenty years from now, I expect New York to have outclassed Chicago in breadth and diversity of significant buildings and urban design. Chicago has struggled or lagged behind from their lack of a top flight architecture school since the 70's. New York, LA and Boston have soaked up most of the best professional talent, because innovative architects are often financially dependent on teaching positions early in their career. Naturally, they've established their own practices and made a much greater regional presence in New York/LA/Boston near these schools, which has left Chicago without (m)any significant architectural practices besides SOM and that is really starting to take effect on the quality of new Chicago developments.

I see what you mean. I didn't realize we were talking about contemporary architecture... in which case Chicago has very little. The newest additions are the hideous Trump tower and the Elysian hotel.
post #1394 of 1906
I was hoping the Calatrava spire would get built.
post #1395 of 1906
Another point of distinction is that New York luckily escaped the Robert Moses era with its best historic neighborhoods still intact. The success of the preservationist movement since the 1970's has had a significant effect on New York's architectural legacy. The gentrification of neighborhoods like Chelsea, Soho, etc. has been tremendously positive in urban design theory as their value finally became understood. Chicago thrived as an architectural center in the 20's-60's when there was little value seen in historic preservation and the city quietly lost a great deal of their historic structures and neighborhoods. I've been looking through Adler & Sullivan's catalogue raisonne and over 50-60% of their Chicago buildings were torn down between the 50's and 80's. It's a travesty.
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