or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Fiddlehead ferns
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Fiddlehead ferns

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
How do I cook these?
post #2 of 15
Mmm...fiddleheads. After cleaning them, I've simply sauteed them in olive oil, salt and pepper on medium-high heat for a few minutes stirring them around every so often until they have some browning around the edges. One could probably add some herbs, but I prefer to let the simplicity of the ferns shine through. I just use them as a contorni for the meal. Enjoy!
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Clean = just rinse or do I need to do more?
post #4 of 15
Just rinsing is plenty.
post #5 of 15
Yep. Just rinse unless you see any clumps of dirt leftover. Also add fresh lemon juice during cooking and just as they come off the heat for added spring zestiness.
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Clean = just rinse or do I need to do more?

I thought you were supposed to trim up the straighter ends so they are closer to the beginning of the coil?

I saw some at the market here last week. After trimming and cleaning, I sauteed for a few minutes in olive oil and threw in a clove of garlic for the last minute.
post #7 of 15
I find the wild ones turn the water quite brackish. I simmer them for a bit and then simmer again in a change of water and then shock in ice water. Sauté in butter season with salt and a squeeze of lemon.
post #8 of 15
They remind me a bit of morels because dirt can hide in lots of little nooks and crannies, but yeah just wash them as people said.
post #9 of 15
These are murder on wine, too.
post #10 of 15
Manton - taste them and follow your instincts.

The advice above is right on, treat them like a bitter green by picking them up in a hot pan with some oil. Rinsing them adds moisture which steams to even the temperature in the pan and removes any grit. Depending on how old they are or how close to the ground they were taken, the "stem" may be more fiberous and want to be removed. The heads may be sandy and want more soaking and rinsing.

Anything you deal with something new, cook a handful and taste to see how they are performing.

B
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Should I blanch first, then saute?
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Clean = just rinse or do I need to do more?
Look at an online guide, you basically need to get rid of some parts. I ate fiddlehead ferns and cream rabbit this week, miam miam. I prefer them plain and sauteed, YMMV.
post #13 of 15
Had them at a dinner not long ago. They looked pretty trimmed up and had been cooked in olive oil. Paired with a buffalo fillet and were pretty good.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Should I blanch first, then saute?

No need to blanch first unless doing lots, in which case blanch for about 1 minute and shock in ice water to refresh and hold.

If they have some moisture on them from the rinsing, they will saute evenly and quickly in a hot pan in about 3 minutes.

Try one raw, you'll find that, like asperagus, they do not need much heat but benefit from cooking.

B
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
I liked these a lot, thanks guys.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Fiddlehead ferns