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American table manners - Page 3

post #31 of 82
Most Americans don't know the proper table manners. Is it the same in Europe?
post #32 of 82
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by intent View Post
Most Americans don't know the proper table manners. Is it the same in Europe?

Yes.
But my intention was to discuss manners themselves, not people's respect of them(or lack, thereof).
post #33 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post
American's have grammars?

..
post #34 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post
American's have manners?

ha...right. "American table manners" is a paradox in itself. I'm appalled by the shit I see even in "nice" restaurants. Eat as Europeans do... with some decor & common sense!
post #35 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid Nickels View Post
ha...right. "American table manners" is a paradox in itself. I'm appalled by the shit I see even in "nice" restaurants. Eat as Europeans do... with some decor & common sense!
How, exactly, do you eat with decor? Do you snag some wallpaper and use it to wipe your chin, or do you grab a candy dish and use it to shovel soup into your mouth? -An American
post #36 of 82
Any generalization will be sterotypical to some extent... I'm in HK now so you could just grab your chopsticks, put the bowl to your lips and shovel it in!!! No one here seems to care
post #37 of 82
I mean not like a slob or a little kid.... just recently at a "nice/ upscale" restaurant in LA I saw a grown man with his wife for dinner, in between audible belching, pushing food onto his fork with his finger.... I mean really... that falls into the realm of the indecorous....
post #38 of 82
Apologies I should have said "decorousness" but I figured the point was clear... I wasn't aware the grammar police were out in force today....
post #39 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kid Nickels View Post
Apologies I should have said "decorousness" but I figured the point was clear... I wasn't aware the grammar police were out in force today....
Oh, my bad. Tuesday is for the manners police and wednesday is grammar police day?
post #40 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Oh, my bad. Tuesday is for the manners police and wednesday is grammar police day?

anyway... c'mon.... I'm not being argumentative.... the point was/is having some level of propriety while eating .... in public I guess should be added. It can't be ignored sometimes when you're dining in a small, cozy bistro and the people at the next table are belching, talking and chewing while food is dropping out of their mouths, etc....
post #41 of 82
matt, you're being really american, I mean rude. ;-)
post #42 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Master-Classter View Post
matt, you're being really american, I mean rude.






;-)

thx Master-Classter
post #43 of 82
When I invite my North American family to restaurants in France, they are shocked by our practice of making mouillettes (dipping bread into the leftover sauce on the plate). North Americans also love dressing up to eat out somewhere nice, which means I frequently come off as a slob in restaurants here. Different strokes?
post #44 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bhowie View Post
It I hold my fork in my left hand with the curved part up...

Quote:
Originally Posted by fwiffo View Post
I learnt from my mother who was born in a British colony so it was always tines down with the fork in the left.

This is absolutely the proper way to use a fork in terms of etiquette, but how contra-functional!

Next question: who spoons their soup away from them?
post #45 of 82
I've found that the way people hold their knife and fork to be a reliable indicator of their social class. It's rather amusing.
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