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American table manners - Page 2

post #16 of 82
One would think it is poor manners to stare at someone, watch how they eat, then critique their method of utilizing eating utensils. When this happens to me I just lift my leg and express myself. Miraculously the crowd disperses and I can go back to eating my meal in peace...
post #17 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allen View Post
As far as I know, if you are left handed you simply reverse the role of the right with the left.



About that Emily Post thing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etmAfOhix4Q notice how the fork ends up in the right hand from time to time.

Mind you, it is not bad table manners to do that in the US, I was just asking if it is also correct in Europe.

I don't think all Americans have bad table manners. For example, I have friends from Boston and from Louisiana and frankly, they have good table manners. At least, better than a certain frenchman I know.

People's manners in the south are usually much better than what I've observed in the midwest, east coast, and anything but a certain strata in the North East.
post #18 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carlisle Blues View Post
One would think it is poor manners to stare at someone, watch how they eat, then critique their method of utilizing eating utensils. When this happens to me I just lift my leg and express myself. Miraculously the crowd disperses and I can go back to eating my meal in peace...
It is rude to stare, and certainly rude to comment. Someone with good manners would do neither, but there would still be some measure of judgement made against you that you'd be completely unaware of.
post #19 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
People's manners in the south are usually much better than what I've observed in the midwest, east coast, and anything but a certain strata in the North East.

I always eat the continental way--it was how I was taught. In New England it is very common, but in the South almost everyone prefers switching after cutting. They do it very gracefully though so there's something to be said for that.
post #20 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
It is rude to stare, and certainly rude to comment. Someone with good manners would do neither, but there would still be some measure of judgement made against you that you'd be completely unaware of.
So true, but, there are judgments made regarding just about every person on earth. Most of those judgments are not made public nor are they cause for incitement or indigestion.
post #21 of 82
When I eat those dusty donuts the whole place ends up looking like a cokehead's den. I don't switch forks though and the french master of gov protocol says you can now eat a salad with a fork and knife cause they have become huge so it's all good.
post #22 of 82
I don't really think about it, but i just realized i change between the american and european style almost every time I eat. I am a heathen.
post #23 of 82
I just don't get it. It looks bad because the knife is not only meant for cutting... you knife does as much work as the fork in the eating process. I just think the way most americans eat looks absolutely terrible... so messy and inefficient. I should also add that some chefs have the worst table manners I've ever seen. FG I don't know if you've ever eaten with Dufresne but it's honestly terrifying.
post #24 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Another New Yorker View Post
I always eat the continental way--it was how I was taught. In New England it is very common, but in the South almost everyone prefers switching after cutting. They do it very gracefully though so there's something to be said for that.

It is also a good way to slow down while eating.

I hold my fork in my left hand with the curved part up and my knife in mt right hand. I also use my knife to put less solid substances on my fork, and I never rotating my fork so that it is more scoop like.
post #25 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by SField View Post
I'm sorry but I find most americans to have brutish table manners. "European" table manners are actually designed to give one the most efficient, and clean way of eating. I don't judge people with manners like yours but I just don't get it.

It seems incredibly inefficient and to me looks rather inelegant. But that's me, and it doesn't really matter that much.
I couldn't agree with you more. +1,000,000.
post #26 of 82
A mans these day, he has no table manner -
He think ok I eat this meals in front of me and fill up my belly with energies i require
Wife not happy about this mess, no sir.
post #27 of 82
I learnt from my mother who was born in a British colony so it was always tines down with the fork in the left. I admit I get lazy after half a dozen cocktails, and put down the knife especially if it's a heavy steak knife. Frankly, most establishments these days barely get the fork sizes and selection of cutlery right so dignifying it with manners is a bit like putting in hundreds of dollars to tailor your Lauren Ralph Lauren suit.

(yes, I cut corn on the cob)
post #28 of 82
What I really hate is americans putting one hand in their lap and then using the side of the fork, often with considerable force to "cut" their food then shovel it into their mouths. It would take half a second to just cut it with their knives but instead they put the fork in their dominant hand and struggle for five seconds using just the fork.
post #29 of 82
I always thought Americans used their fingers to eat food. Knives and forks is a European thing, and the rest of the world uses a pair of wooden sticks.
post #30 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post
I always thought Americans used their fingers to eat food. Knives and forks is a European thing, and the rest of the world uses a pair of wooden sticks.

A lot of cultures use their fingers to eat, albeit they do it very elegantly
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