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Full Review - Richard Lim Tailor – PLUS - Finished Navy Summer Jacket Pics - Page 4

post #46 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron View Post
Also, there seems to be an issue with rippling below your back collar. Did you make adjustments in the patterns between each commission?
Every picture has this issue but it appears to be more related to their shoulder construction method. The shoulders have small bumps along them, mostly on the left side.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CYstyle View Post
Just need to shorten the back at top, will pull the vents up as well so they lie flat. but it looks to me like they used fusing.
This solution would not be best, jackets need a bit of extra length at the center back. The roll is from tension across the back and blades. Better construction will clean the back up. I can't tell if they fuse or not. This comment is related to the picture of the tailor with the iron. There are stay pieces on the underarm and along the front armhole. At first i thought it was fusing but then noticed a machine stitch holding them in place, so I can't say.
post #47 of 106
The OP states that ever visable stitch is done by hand. By the looks of it none of the buttonholes are done by hand, however.
post #48 of 106
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred H. View Post
Thank you for sharing. I know that these kinds of threads take a lot of time and effort to start and continue. You are a true gentleman to do both. I applaud also your decisions to break away from the pack and develop your own personal brand. PGuido has done that to very good advantage. Thanks again.

Thanks for the compliments Fred. I'm glad you appreciate the experimental process of trying something new.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeLA View Post
Coolal goes to all this trouble to take all these photos and do a very detailed write-up, and all you can do is shit on him. So classy.

To Coolal: The jackets are beautiful I Richard Kim is now at the top of my to-do list. Thanks for one of the best posts I've seen on here.

Great to hear that Richard is now on your radar Thanks again for the comments.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred H. View Post
Thank you for sharing. I know that these kinds of threads take a lot of time and effort to start and continue. You are a true gentleman to do both. I applaud also your decisions to break away from the pack and develop your own personal brand. PGuido has done that to very good advantage. Thanks again.

The time and effort was completely worth it with a response like this. I'm truly glad you guys appreciate the documentation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post
Every picture has this issue but it appears to be more related to their shoulder construction method. The shoulders have small bumps along them, mostly on the left side.



This solution would not be best, jackets need a bit of extra length at the center back. The roll is from tension across the back and blades. Better construction will clean the back up.

I can't tell if they fuse or not. This comment is related to the picture of the tailor with the iron. There are stay pieces on the underarm and along the front armhole. At first i thought it was fusing but then noticed a machine stitch holding them in place, so I can't say.

Thanks for the comments Despos. The tension across the blades is the next issue I hope to iron out with Richard Lim. I'll mention adding a bit of extra length at the center back.

As for fusing, I know for sure that this jacket has none, and is fully canvassed to the quarters. However, I also know that Richard Lim does use fusing when requested.

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
The OP states that ever visable stitch is done by hand. By the looks of it none of the buttonholes are done by hand, however.

When it comes to the buttonholes on the jacket, i'm nearly 100% sure that they are all done by hand. The button holes on the pants are all done by machine, but they were rather explicit in stating that visible stitching on a jacket is by default all hand work.
post #49 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolal View Post

Thanks for the comments Despos. The tension across the blades is the next issue I hope to iron out with Richard Lim. I'll mention adding a bit of extra length at the center back.


Not saying you need more length. I'm saying it would create another issue if he sguares up the shoulder to remove the wrinkle/roll across the blades. If you square up you remove length at the center back and that is not desirable.

Better to let them assess and use their methods on rectifying issues.
post #50 of 106
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post
Not saying you need more length. I'm saying it would create another issue if he sguares up the shoulder to remove the wrinkle/roll across the blades. If you square up you remove length at the center back and that is not desirable.

Better to let them assess and use their methods on rectifying issues.

Ahh, okay. Thank you for the clarification. Your expert perspective means a lot.

I'll email Richard's assistant the photos from this post and schedule a time to assess and rectify it.
post #51 of 106
-This review is on the 3rd of 3 jackets you had commissions, assuming Richard Lim 'improved' on all 3 jackets. -need for High arm holes, especially in the last picture you posted on the back. There looks like a strange droop from the wide shoulder pads to the chest... A slightly fitted cut a personal preference -the whole post screamed 'marketing campaign'. Better if you make a down to earth review of the positive and negative, and not 'embellish' the story with the fabric with a bow tie on the top
post #52 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post
Not saying you need more length. I'm saying it would create another issue if he sguares up the shoulder to remove the wrinkle/roll across the blades. If you square up you remove length at the center back and that is not desirable.

Better to let them assess and use their methods on rectifying issues.

thanks! better perspective
post #53 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeLA View Post
Coolal goes to all this trouble to take all these photos and do a very detailed write-up, and all you can do is shit on him. So classy.

To Coolal: The jackets are beautiful I Richard Kim is now at the top of my to-do list. Thanks for one of the best posts I've seen on here.

It's not thread shitting...each jacket he posts has visible flaws that need to be worked out. The point of bespoke is to clothing that fits your body. And there's a big difference if the garment has fusing vs a fully canvassed construction
post #54 of 106
Freddy V is yet another LA gem. The man does all my shirts. Extremely easy to work w/... The best.
post #55 of 106
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ginlimetonic View Post
-This review is on the 3rd of 3 jackets you had commissions, assuming Richard Lim 'improved' on all 3 jackets.
-need for High arm holes, especially in the last picture you posted on the back. There looks like a strange droop from the wide shoulder pads to the chest... A slightly fitted cut a personal preference
-the whole post screamed 'marketing campaign'. Better if you make a down to earth review of the positive and negative, and not 'embellish' the story with the fabric with a bow tie on the top

As I stated earlier, I believe that high armholes are not de rigueur, especially not with the summer jacket. I've got high armholes on the first two jackets and while it's certainly more "snug", it's also warmer with less circulation of air.

I'm not a journalist or a professional reviewer, I'm a biased and happy customer. I did my best to demonstrate the pitfalls of a bespoke process that is mostly unguided. If all you see is a "marketing campaign" that's your loss and / or gain.

The bow tied fabric was delivered that way from Lovat Mill in Scotland. I was simply documenting the process. Had you read my other posts, you'd know that I've been posting as the commissions have progressed. This is merely a cumulative review based on those experiences.

Your pessimistic outlook seems to be more than capable of balancing the praise of a happy customer. Let's leave it at that.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyler View Post
Freddy V is yet another LA gem. The man does all my shirts. Extremely easy to work w/... The best.

Freddy V really is wonderful! Such a hidden gem in LA. I get a smile on my face every time he says he's busy. I hope it stays that way. His prices and quality are profoundly hard to beat.
post #56 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
Thanks for putting the work into this post, whether or not anyone is a prospective client of Richard, this is the kind of stuff that makes SF a worthy read.

+1

Thanks for sharing, coolal! Enjoy the new jacket and the unique lapels.
post #57 of 106
Thread Starter 
A Short Aside on Posture (posted as a follow-up rather than a whole new post)
 

In looking over pics, the criticisms and how the jacket feels. I was very curious what variable posture played. Both at the time of photographing and while trying out the basted and final jacket. I've noticed that I have two distinct postures and I change between them almost unconsciously:

 

A) This is my "at attention" pose. It's what I typically find myself using in front of a mirror and consequently the same pose I use at the tailor.

 

B) This is the byproduct of poor posture from endless hours in front of my computer. My shoulders pull forward and down, while my whole body hunches over a tad. This is the pose I typically adopt in front of the camera when there is no mirror.

 

I remember reading, on the forums, that some tailors say they cut a jacket for how their client stands normally, others cut for how their client should stand. The latter is an anecdote I read in regards to a Savile Row tailor (not sure who). Posture "A" is how I should stand, while posture "B" is how I find myself standing when I'm not paying attention to posture. In the context of the jacket, I wouldn't call one "right" or "wrong". That said, I think it's obvious that each pose creates a completely different look. "A" is more stout and has more of a chest depending how "at attention" I am. "B" falls off the shoulders and drapes down across my chest. A lot airier, but also cooler to wear.

 

Both are comfortable poses to keep while wearing the jacket. However, I thought it'd be interesting to share the implications of posture, picking the "right" one and keeping it consistent.

 


Edited by coolal - 12/7/11 at 6:44pm
post #58 of 106
Thanks again for the posture thoughts/comparison. Posture DOES make a huge difference in how a fit looks. Perhaps some of more caustic brethren will factor that it before lobbing a gratuitous grenade.
post #59 of 106
The tailor should use the way you normally stand. That way the coat is balanced. if you normally all the time have a stooped posture, but stood super straight for the fitting, then when you revert back to your original stooped posture, the coat will be longer in the front and shorter in the back. sleeves may also be off.

although everyone should learn to stand straight! What happens is when they are younger, it's only a slightly stooped posture, and not too noticeable, as people are usually in motion anyhow. When you get old their backs get more bent as they get weaker and their vertebrae support deteriorates. I've seen old hunched over people when it's really bad, it's a challenge just to be able to create a monstrosity just to be able to put on the guy, drape lapel rolls etc all goes out the window
post #60 of 106
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred H. View Post
Thanks again for the posture thoughts/comparison. Posture DOES make a huge difference in how a fit looks. Perhaps some of more caustic brethren will factor that it before lobbing a gratuitous grenade.

One can always hope -- It's surprising how much posture plays into fit (even though it feels obvious in retrospect).

Quote:
Originally Posted by CYstyle View Post
The tailor should use the way you normally stand. That way the coat is balanced. if you normally all the time have a stooped posture, but stood super straight for the fitting, then when you revert back to your original stooped posture, the coat will be longer in the front and shorter in the back. sleeves may also be off.

although everyone should learn to stand straight! What happens is when they are younger, it's only a slightly stooped posture, and not too noticeable, as people are usually in motion anyhow. When you get old their backs get more bent as they get weaker and their vertebrae support deteriorates. I've seen old hunched over people when it's really bad, it's a challenge just to be able to create a monstrosity just to be able to put on the guy, drape lapel rolls etc all goes out the window

It's very interesting to see how much postures affects what's possible, especially with regard to details like drape and lapel roll.

My issue is trying to decide which posture is "normal". Whenever I catch myself stooping, I immediately straighten out. As you can imagine, however, I spend a fair amount of time not catching myself.

My guess is that everyone has different priorities. Finding the middle ground, between a fit that brings out the best posture and one that conforms when lazy, will be the hard part. Personally, I like a wardrobe the rewards good posture with a stout appearance, but has the ability to remain clean when my posture changes. I believe this jacket is a pretty good example. But I've still got to play around with more construction styles and silhouettes.
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