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Asian American Overachievers when test taking endsing ends. - Page 4

post #46 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
We are. By buying all of their garbage and using their labor.

I hope you weren't serious.
post #47 of 158
ITT stereotypes

Give it a generation or two you'll see plenty asian CEOs.
post #48 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
I hate the term "book smarts". It's used as the negative half of a false dichotomy.

I also find the idea that leaders are born and not raised laughable. Like I said, yes, there are exceptions, but by-and-large, people grow into the roles for which they are groomed. I hear about programs that are designed to help minorities (African Americans and Latinos in disavantaged conditions, in particular) speak and comport themselves in such a way that the mannerisms they've learned since birth do not impeded their progress in corporate America. By the same token that African Americans are not born mean-mugging, and Latinos are not born calling people "Holmes", Asians are not born mumbling, unable to make eye contact, etc...

There is actually a phrase in Cantonese "Dai Fong" which roughly translated, means "generous", but also encompasses openness and expansiveness, and other qualities which correspond very closely to the characteristics that Americans, in particular, like to call "leadership" qualities." So yes, in Chinese culture, at least, these qualities are valued.

I actually know some azns in positions of power in Asia and, while anecdotic, must say they don't have the same attitude as their western counterparts (counterparts=people in positions of power in the western world not western-azn).

As for leaders being born well if you don't learn it you don't even know how to sex (where to stick it), people on SF overscore the importance of nature by such a huge margin it is laughable. (in other words +1).

Once again I am presenting leadership traits as "traits that make you attain and maintain a position of leadership in the contemporary western/eastern world" not something to which I attach positive or negative values.
post #49 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatGuy View Post
The only Asians that don't make it, are the one's that hate themselves. They can never see themselves as equals to the white-man. I personally don't get it. But, hey, I don't have a small penis.

Seen it all over the place.

How are you so sure you don't have a small penis? Maybe she lied to make you feel good about your tiny self.
post #50 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by v.freeman View Post
I hope you weren't serious.

Sometimes it's just better to put them on your ignore list.
post #51 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
I hate the term "book smarts". It's used as the negative half of a false dichotomy.

I also find the idea that leaders are born and not raised laughable. Like I said, yes, there are exceptions, but by-and-large, people grow into the roles for which they are groomed. I hear about programs that are designed to help minorities (African Americans and Latinos in disavantaged conditions, in particular) speak and comport themselves in such a way that the mannerisms they've learned since birth do not impeded their progress in corporate America. By the same token that African Americans are not born mean-mugging, and Latinos are not born calling people "Holmes", Asians are not born mumbling, unable to make eye contact, etc...

There is actually a phrase in Cantonese "Dai Fong" which roughly translated, means "generous", but also encompasses openness and expansiveness, and other qualities which correspond very closely to the characteristics that Americans, in particular, like to call "leadership" qualities." So yes, in Chinese culture, at least, these qualities are valued.

I am not saying that nuture is out of the picture. I understand Latinos are not born muggers and such, but there is inherent qualities that we have that are in our genetics. Like you see kids who never meet their real parents and then they do and they have the same mannerism and whatnot. It is not all mutually exclusive.

"Dai Fong" could just not be implemented in the same manner within American culture. There could just be a different way to apply these qualities depending on your surroundings and the culture around you.

Perhaps the stress on academics over years over emphasizes just that, academics and not enough dai fong. It seems that it definitely gets lost somewhere, in my experience. I am not saying it doesn't exist, but it certaintly does not appear to be forefront.
post #52 of 158
I am a mid level manager in the federal government where a good portion of my staff are asian. I am getting closed to a promotion and I have already recommended one of my asian employees as a person that I would like to replace me if I get the promotion that has been promissed. While small in stature, she does have the knowledge and interpersonal skills that my position requires. THe only thing I worry about with her is she does lack a sense of "presence". This really is an issue because I do have to deal with some problamatic employees that will surely give her problems as well. However, like me, she will figure out how to manage said employees without inciting union grievances.
post #53 of 158
holy shit 11 page article, don't have that kinda patience
post #54 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by aphextwin07 View Post
holy shit 11 page article, don't have that kinda patience

The Asians do.
post #55 of 158
The lack of Asian politicians has always baffled me a bit.
post #56 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
The lack of Asian politicians has always baffled me a bit.

There are notable exceptions, but they tend to be highly assimilated. Early generation immigrants tend to aspire to the very middle class "American dream". It's hard to think about influencing a nation when you are just trying to make good. That goes for everyone, actually, not just first immigrants.
post #57 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
The lack of Asian politicians has always baffled me a bit.

Names usually too funny to run for election.
post #58 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Herbert View Post
My experience from working with management from both Asia and America...

Americans respect people with very high confidence who have a brash and aggressive style. ALL american managers that ive worked with have been like this. in fact ive never met a shy american. It must be beat out of them in primary school or something. Even young people can make it into management through being aggressive and activing confident - even when they havent had time to learn the core skills of the trade.

Asians are traditionally more respectful of humility and being humble. they tend to respect seniority and years of experience more. They also tend to be more shy and polite. These traits probably dont lend themselves to being seen as 'management material' in the US.

Brash and aggressive are not the opposite of shy. I've known several very highly placed American leaders to be assertive, but who would never be described as brash or aggressive. One of the best pieces of advice I got from a very successful businessman, who I look to as a mentor is "the conversation doesn't stop after you leave the room," which is to say that you can't just impose your will on people, you actually have to get them to sign onto your ideas and program.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post
I actually know some azns in positions of power in Asia and, while anecdotic, must say they don't have the same attitude as their western counterparts (counterparts=people in positions of power in the western world not western-azn).

As for leaders being born well if you don't learn it you don't even know how to sex (where to stick it), people on SF overscore the importance of nature by such a huge margin it is laughable. (in other words +1).

Once again I am presenting leadership traits as "traits that make you attain and maintain a position of leadership in the contemporary western/eastern world" not something to which I attach positive or negative values.

I agree with you, for the most part. However, and knowing people in high leadership position both in Asia and America, I think that the core qualities of leadership seem to be pretty consistent between cultures, though the specific social signifiers of leadership obviously vary between cultures.
post #59 of 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
The lack of Asian politicians has always baffled me a bit.

obama spent time in Indonesia. asian enough.. lol
post #60 of 158
In my experience in banking, Asian kids were the ones that took criticism in the worst of ways. And I have had 2 Asian bosses and both have been the most anal, get lost in the details, make anyone under you miserable kind of way. I hope (and think) that my experiences are outliers.
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